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Found 76 results

  1. Fossils on Wheels can officially say we are an elementary assembly program We will be doing two presentations for all of the students at Nord Country Day School. it is a small charter in the middle of farm country here. I personally love the single class presentations because they allow you to interact with the students in a more in-depth manner. The assembly style programs are our best way to travel to schools outside of city though. We can educate an entire school versus 30-35 students at a time. This is pilot program but it is very important to our future to develop a large scale traveling fossil program. Things are moving very quickly for us and we are starting to reach large numbers of students. A big leap forward for us and a chance to bring real fossils to an entire school. This will also be the debut for our Diplodocus fossil which is our largest piece. I am really excited to bring Dippy to a presentation.
  2. I have been working hard lately on all of our programs and we are very close to having the dinosaur presentation I want us to have. We have a name for this program, Dinos Rock. Yes it is not super creative but for 2nd graders, this is a geology themed program. For 3rd graders, it is adaptation based but the name works. We have added some pieces that gives us more than a few teeth. Nothing museum quality or anything but a few bones help the visual factor. I have been studying the biology, geology and ecology of dinosaurs so the science will be good. my son is working on the art but we wont have any done soon, he has school projects a head of this. We are close to being ready a full 6 months before I thought we would be. Hell Creek was going to be a focus for us because the fossils are available and this is the fauna that most kids will recognize. If you are willing to look hard, you can also find some real bargains from this formation. We turned a lot of early attention collecting attention to Hell Creek dinosaurs and I am actually really happy with where we are at with the fossil material we have. There is a lot of room to add and maybe upgrade in the future but this is a good start. This is the famous T-Rex and Triceratops fauna and we started our collection with those critters. Very early on, we were able to get a few Hell CreekTriceratops teeth. I am very happy that through a purchase from TFF member, we added two frill pieces. They are Lance formation but we are not covering the Lance formation yet so they will be used here. I also added a frill piece from Hell Creek. The kids will get to touch the largest frill piece which is a great bonus. An iconic dinosaur and I think well represented. Also early on, we stumbled into a great bit of a luck. A TFF member saw a post of ours and passed it on to another TFF member who sold us a beautiful Tyrannosaurus Rex partial tooth and gave us a really nice Nano too. It was very affordable and a generous gift was added that gave us nice pieces from the most famous dinosaur ever. The rock star really. I was not sure we would be able to get a decent example at all but to do it right off the bat was HUGE. This would not have happened if not for the members that decided to help us out. We are extremely grateful The first dinosaur fossil we got were two Hell Creek Edmontosaurus teeth that were a gift. We acquired a nice jaw fragment in a trade. I am a bargain shopper with a limited budget so I LOVE our Edmontosaurus as it has not cost much at all. I named this display Eddie I like it so much lol Hadrosaurs are important dinosaurs to talk about and I think a fair amount of kids may not know about them. I would like to add another bone later too. They seem attainable for us. Acheroraptor was behind only T-rex on the my list and we got a really beautiful tooth and it was another bargain pick up. I will talk a lot about this species and I will get deep into the biology/ecology of this awesome dino because I love Dromaeosaurids. Raptors are also an iconic dinosaur that kids love and this is a relatively new species which is another fun thing to discuss with the kids. We will also be introducing the kids to a theropod they have never heard of, Richardoestesia gilmorei. I have told me son to envision a toothed Cormorant type dinosaur as I lean toward them being a fish eater. It is pretty cool to get a Hell Creek dino that they will not know anything about. We have yet to add a Thescelosaurus fossil but we will before we start presenting. I want to add another piece of the fauna and it seems this is the most inexpensive option we will have. It will also give the kids another dinosaur they probably do not know and it will round out the basic Hell Creek fauna. There is no shortage of dinosaurs that we can add either. An Anky or Nodosaur scute is way up on the program list of fossils for me and hopefully we can find one from this formation. Dakotaraptor is #1 on my personal list and I will get one eventually. A Troodontid is also very high on the list as well. I know eventually i will also pick up an Ornithominid too. All three of these are more expensive so we will have to save and wait but each one would also make awesome educational dinosaurs. I also really want to add an Avian fossil. I have not researched this but my guess is they are very rare. Leptoceratops is another species I would love to add at some point too. They are really cute and kids will dig them. Anyway, here are some of the fossils. I think we have a good start going to our Hell Creek collection and I am looking forward to taking these to work with me very soon. Pic 1- Triceratops teeth and Eddie Pic 2- T-Rex, Nano, and Hell's Thief. I am so happy to have these fossils. Pic 3- One of the frill pieces. This one will end up in a larger Trike display with more teeth and another frill. Plus we will have nice frill for kids to check out too.
  3. Hello i bought this triceratops tooth a while ago and was just double checking its authenticity. Is it real? Thanks. -Tom
  4. Triceratops Tooth in Matrix

    From the album Lance fm. Microsite Finds

    Triceratops sp. (horridus or prorsus) Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian~ 66 mya) Lance formation
  5. Hi All, I was wondering if anyone had any tips on prepping this partial Triceratops horn, and if I should us glue or not. I also believe there's a tiny section of skin impression (Which I've gone and highlighted in red) but I could be wrong? any help would be much appreciated... Thanks! Ryan. here are some pictures
  6. Triceratops spit tooth

    From the album Dinosaurs

    This is a fragment of a very small Triceratops spit tooth. Note some of the bone is still attached.
  7. Triceratops jawbone section

    From the album Dinosaurs

    This is a Triceratops jaw section from Hell Creek.
  8. Mystery dinosaur Horn

    Here's another Cretaceous western fossil that needs an ID. Its either from Hell Creek or Lance Creek (will have to check my records again), and I initially purchased it as a young triceratops nasal horn. After looking at it some more, I'm wondering if it might be an ankylosaur spike, or maybe something else. Thoughts?
  9. A new, startling revelation you may find interesting: https://canadianmuseumofnature.wordpress.com/2018/12/12/triceratops-skull/ The skin impression found on a Triceratops skull found by Charles Sternberg in Saskatchewan, Canada, is quite a surprising discovery, potentially giving people an idea of what the skin of Triceratops looked like, because no other Triceratops specimen has skin impressions preserved. The Tyrannosaurus rex skin impression found last year isn't too far from how T. rex is depicted in children's movies, and the newly discovered Triceratops skin impression may or may not be close to how kids illustrate Triceratops, while giving clues to what ceratopsid skin looked like.
  10. On Sunday I took a trip to the Natural History Museum in London. I queued up before it opened at 10am and even before then there was a long queue. I have not visited this museum since I was a child and spent an entire day there (10am to 4.30pm - a long time). I was surprised as it is a lot bigger than I remembered and there was so much to see. This place has the most wonderful things and is an incredible place to learn. The museum showcases a Baryonyx, Sophie the Stegosaurus (the world's most complete Stegosaurus) and more! The moving Trex and Deinonychus are also really realistic in the way they move. If you like your dinosaur teeth, the Megalosaurus and Daspletosaurus teeth are out of this world! There is something for everyone in this museum and I would highly recommend that you visit here if you have not already! A lot of the dinosaur specimens are casts taken from other museums but they are still cool to look at. I had taken the photos on my SLR and due to the size of the photos I had to reduce the quality of them to be able to post on the forum which is unfortunate but it's the only way otherwise the photos would take a really long time to load. There are more non-dinosaur related photos that I will be posting at some point later on but may take me some time to pick out. Enjoy the photos from this section of the museum! Blue Zone Dinosaurs (has a mix of some photos of crocs too)
  11. Triceratops ulna

    Hello! This is my latest project, it’s a triceratops ulna pilled from Wyoming. Preservation isn’t the greatest but still a fun one!
  12. These triceratops teeth looked polished, and there is two white dots on the bigger one that I think is a burn from preparing the tooth. It would be great help if someone could tell me if they are real or fake. Thanks so much!
  13. What are these

    So this is at Texas Tarrant County near a large pond. Not sure if the tooth is crocodile, fish, marine dinosaur or small mammel. The rock with circles on it I'm guessing is an imprint of a shell. And the other one I think is bone in Rock not sure if it's like a tooth if so I guess bovine or triceratops but I'm not sure if it's a recent bone or a bone from the dinosaur era (or if it's a bone at all). Also a general question of how do you know if something is a modern bone or dinosaur bone, I found some level surface and you can see the face of the bone, the rest is in the ground and it's near a pond. If anyone has answers to these questions that will be great. Excuse my lack of knowledge in these areas I'm new and I've just started with no current knowledge in dinosaurs.
  14. Triceratops skull and brain case

    From the album Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Another view showing an area of what I do not know. I'm guessing it involves nerve fibers/channels.
  15. Triceratops skull and brain case

    From the album Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Another view showing more channels/cross sections of blood flow(the small solid dark gray areas), and nerve channels. I'm not entirely sure what the large dark areas are, although I believe it to be related to blood flow as well.
  16. Triceratops skull with brain case

    From the album Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Another view showing the spongy internal bone growth
  17. Triceratops skull and brain case

    From the album Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    2 pieces of a triceratops skull with brain case impression. Blood vessels, veins, and arteries visible, as well as nerve channels. I have to contact in order to get the fossil information again.
  18. Triceratops frill fragment

    From the album Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Fragment of a triceratops frill. Blood vessel channels and holes easily visible. Sadly this is an early fossil of mine, and until fairly recently I did not record any information, I just kept if it was sent along with the fossil.
  19. Triceratops claw?

    Hi, Is this a claw from a Triceratops? it is from the Hell Creek Formation and is slightly over 2 inches in length.
  20. I feel silly posting a $20 tooth for opinions, but I guess lately it seems like I should be careful on all things fossil. Here's a Trike tooth that I think is an alright starter. The crown seems to have a little less than average wear, and there's part of a root showing, though it's a browner color than the rest of the tooth. Not sure if that matters or not, but I know I've seen that mentioned before in cases of other fossils. A nice tooth, or a bad trap? Thanks everyone!
  21. I have a random fossil/dinosaur question. Has it been properly researched and somewhat/ mostly proven whether or not Triceratops did in fact exist I have read multiple articles ( on the internet and not peer reviwed) that have stated it is thought that the Triceratops and Torosaurus are one in the same They have even gone on to say that because nobody has yet to discover any juvenile Torosaurus fossil pieces,skulls, or skeletons that Triceratops could possibly be young Torosaurus, and as they matured their frills changed shape much like some anima look s coloring changes during maturation. What are people's thoughts? I just ask because I see a lot of teeth labeled Triceratops and so far none labeled Torosaurus.
  22. Triceratops shield piece?

    I have this little chunk of trike bone here. I got it a while back and it was labeled as nothing more than a trike bone. I took some time and I noticed something strange. When I look at the bone from one side I see two halves, each with a different bone density. One of my pictures shows this. My suspicion is that the denser side of this bone is the external side of a triceratops head shield piece. The side that is more porous is the internal side of the shield. Are my suspicions correct?
  23. Found this enigmatic piece on one of my digs in Wyoming. Found on a ranch in the Lance Creek Formation (Maastrichtian age). Not sure if anything can be said about it other than that it is a bone fragment, but maybe someone knows more than I do. Seems too big/thick to be turtle, but potentially possible. Seems like it could be a worn spike or epoccipital of some sort? (A lot of triceratops specimens were found in the area. Hopefully I can get a bit better of handle on what this is, Thanks for the help!
  24. Triceratops horridus tooth

    Ladies and Gents, Another I.D. question for you guys. I have an I.D card with this one that claims that this is a triceratops horridus tooth with Edmontosaurus bones. Thanks
  25. Dinosaur Postures

    After the satisfying outcome of my sloth-experiment (changing geoworld megatherium to Thalassocnus) I took another look at some older dinosaur models. Sauropoda- Giraffatitan: "Edutoys Brachiosaurus", added teeth and one cervical vertebra to give him a more erect pose, Changed cervical ribs from medial "monorib". changed leg pose. Thyreophora- Stegosaurus: Glencoe models , changed tail and thagomizer to more modern pose Ceratopsia- Triceratops: Kaiyodo "Wild rush" gave him a treetrunk to look over. Ornithopoda- Parasaurolophus: Geoworld, drilled out intercostal plastik. painted it. Theropoda- Spinosaurus: had it 3d printed. I wonder if I should give it a swimming pose, what do you think?
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