Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'triceratops'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 106 results

  1. Triceratops beak

    Any thoughts on this? Would be a nice, unusual piece for my collection if it's as described. Triceratops beak. Hell Creek. Garfield County. Montana. Weight: 0.255 kg Length: 13cm Width: 16cm Depth 3cm Now, it does resemble one that I saw for sale elsewhere googling (which has sold out) but, given it's quite a pricey piece. I figure it best to double check on here to see if it's as described. If it is, it's one I'd definitely be ordering. Thanks very much.
  2. Hello again, while looking for more preserved dinosaurian remains I found this: It is from a bequest/inheritance so little is known by the family selling it except that it was bought at an auction in the US and properly declared to customs. It was told to be a pelvic bone of a juvenile triceratops. It measures roughly length: 25cm, width: 18cm, width: 8 cm and the weight is roundabout 2.5 kg. If it is a real pelvic bone to me it looks very worn or in a bad shape. What puzzles me is the black part of rock you can see in the bottom right corner of some pictures... On the other hand it is the first complete/intact pelvic bone I was able to find... What is your opinion on this piece? Is it real or a concretion? Is it a pelvic bone and to which species can (if even possible given the poor information) it be narrowed down? Is it worth to be collected? Thanks in advance!
  3. Triceratops Collar Piece?

    I have seen this item for sale and if genuine it would be a cool thing to add to the collection. But can it be identified as a triceratops collar piece with any certainty? The description says [it is a Triceratops collar fragment from the Hell Creek Formation in Montana, USA].
  4. Good evening, I recently purchased a couple of teeth and now I am printing the labels for my collection. This tooth is supposed to be a triceratops from the Hell Creek Formation in the US (unfortunately no state or county provided). Now I am wondering if it is possible to attribute this tooth either to triceratops horridus or to triceratops prorsus (as far as I know theee were tge only species found in this formation)?
  5. Wanted to share my latest acquisition. Decades ago a friend of mine found this triceratops dorsal vertebra in Montana. There was evidence of post-mortem predation by a nanotyrannus. A tooth broke off and embedded in the centrum. Enjoy!
  6. Good afternoon! I'm new to the forum and was hoping you all could help me with framing advice. I wanted to get a very special gift for my little brother for his birthday (his twin passed away a few years ago so I always try to make it a super special day), so I purchased a trike "spitter" tooth online. It's 1 - 1/8" in size and I was thinking about purchasing a floating frame to display it but I'm stumped as to which size I should purchase. I'm including a photo of the type of frame I was interested in using and the tooth I purchased. Is this the best way to display the tooth and if so, which size frame should I get? If there's a better way to display, please share any suggestions! Can you tell I'm new to this? Thank you all in advance, Amy
  7. Fibula ID please

    Hello, I recently finishing preparing this fossil and you may have seen it in the Prep section, however given I would also appreciate an ID, the smart suggestion was made to move it here. I bought this off Ryan at Hell Creek Dinosaurs who discovered it on one of his trips last summer to Hell Creek. Apologies for not having it next to a scale, but it's 46cm long. Ryan suggested it could be a Triceratops or a Hardosaur (Edmontosaurus one assumes) and although I was erring on the latter, will admit having seen some trike fibulas recently, now I'm not 100% sure, hence this post. Showing pics from the find (Ryan very kindly agreed I could use. Thanks again!) and now after prep. If these aren't clear enough or you need more to be able to help, just let me know. Any thoughts much appreciated. Thanks Dave ps: If you're questioning the prep, in my defence, it was my first ever...
  8. I came across this [verbatim seller description removed] Hell Creek Formation, Montana.
  9. Wow its already the 17 of January where has the year gone? Well always time for some cool photos of some great fossils to keep us going Its not unheard of to find dinosaur bite marks on a fossil. This Triceratops pelvis on display at Museum of the Rockies has Tyrannosaurus bite marks on it (red arrows) One way to identify a theropod bone is to see if they are hollow, another way is to look at their vertebra most are pneumatized, have a honeycomb structure. Here is an example of a T rex vertebra You hear alot about the Nanotyrannus associated with the Dueling Dinosaurs but here is a photo of the foot of other partner in this dynamic due a Triceratops. Complete ceratopsian feet are rare and this is the ventral view of one. in the less prepped version Mike Tribold posted this photo of Axestemys infernalis, a new soft shelled turtle from the Hell Creek Formation. I am sure Mike will have it on display at his booth at the Tucson 22nd Street Show More info on this turtle can be found here https://palaeo-electronica.org/content/2019/2827-a-new-species-of-trionychid The lower jaw of the pterosaur Liaodactylus, with its numerous and extremely slender teeth. At 160 million years old, this is the earliest evidence of adaptations for filter-feeding in pterosaurs. Info by Jordan Bestwick Check out these loooong flight feathers on the wings of Confuciusornis sanctus. Courtesy of Talia Lowi-Marri Palaeontological Institute in Moscow gives us the rather mean-looking Archosaurus rossicus, from the very end of the Permian (~255 Mya) in Russia. Skull is a bit under half a meter long. Not something you want to meet hiking in Siberia. The Supraorbital horn of Baby and Juvenile Triceratops (or Torosaurus), courtesy of the BHI Carnotaurus sastrei, original holotype skull. photo by Damian Perez Tom Holtz shared a different view of the Tyrant King skull From the Smithsonian's NMNH Deep Time exhibit, a beautiful Gorgosaurus libratus skull Here is a photo that compares different Tyrannosaurid finger bones digit I-1. From left to right : Gorgosaurus TVM 2001.89.1, Nanotyrannus BHI-6437, adult T.rex MOR-980, and sub adult T.rex TCM 2001.90.1. Your can see on similarities with the two on the right both of Trex of different ages. Interesting thought the paleontologists said the younger one should be longer photo P. Larsen
  10. Dinosaur Saturday

    Hadrosaur carcasses must have been great hiding places for fishes during the Cretaceous. A beautifully preserved primitive sturgeon, in the belly cavity of a Brachylophosaurus skeleton. Thanks Jack Horner Here’s the holotype skull of Gorgosaurus libratus. This specimen was collected by Charles Sternberg from Dino Prov Park, Alberta & described by Lawrence Lambe, Canada’s first vertebrate palaeontolgist. Thanks Dave Evans Thigh bone and shin bone of a subadult Triceratops. The thigh is much longer than the shin making for a relatively short stride, suggesting Triceratops was very slow. T. rex was definitely faster than a trike & probably didn’t need to run to catch one. Compliments of Dave Evans. Wonderful skull of the very early dinosaur Eoraptor from the PVSJ collection in San Juan. It’s from the early Late Triassic Ischigualasto Formation. NHM Dinolab The theropod Coelophysis baur the State Fossil of New Mexico. This mass death assemblage depicts multiple individuals who died at the same time. Thanks Guy Leahy. Here’s a nice big T. rex tooth from Saskatchewan. Not the prettiest but from a cool location. D. Evans Acrocanthosaurus mount completed by the Black Hills Institute. Heading to the Netherlands Something you dont see often jaws of Iguanacolossus fortis. Its a genus of iguanodontian ornithopod dinosaur that lived in North America during the Early Cretaceous period from Utah . Jim Kirkland Dinossur material from Austria wow.... you are looking at the nodosaur Struthiosaurus austriacus, from the Campanian of eastern Austria. Represented by multiple individuals of different growth stages, here is the braincase and two spikes. Tom Raven
  11. Triceratops horridus (Marsh 1889)

    From the album Vertebrates (other than fish)

    10x12mm. Tooth. Obtained on a trade with Strepsodus. Lance (Creek) Formation Maastrichtian Late Cretaceous Weston County, Wyoming, USA
  12. Hello! Purchased this piece at a Gem and Mineral show. Seller had the item listed as an unknown dinosaur bone, and potentially thought part of a ceratops horn and acquired in Utah. Bottom looks almost suture like? Honestly, not sure. Got at a good price so it was worth the risk. About 5 inches tall, 3 inches wide, 2 inches thickness. Probably weighs 1-2lbs. Has been glued.
  13. Triceratops Squamosal Section I.D. Help

    Hello! I recently attended a show and picked up this Triceratops Squamosal Section (labeled as such). I don't have much experience when it comes to ceratopsian bones and I was hoping you guys could help either confirm the I.D. or correct it. It was found in the lance Creek Formation, Wyoming by the seller, dated between 69 to 66 Mya. I know determining the exact species is difficult, and I was thinking of using the I.D. of Chasmosaurinae indet. (Thanks @-Andy- for your helpful naming guide on the "Dromaeosaurus Teeth?" thread ). I tried to get appropriate angled pictures to help with I.D.ing but if another view would be helpful that I missed, I'm more than happy to get some more pictures once I get home. Thanks for your help!!
  14. Hello! Over the weekend I made some new labels for my fossil collection and I was wondering what everyone thought of them. I have QR codes which link to the corresponding "prehistoric-wildlife.com" species page for more info, and I added in some basic I.D. info to the cards to not crowd them. I also attached numbers to the labels and the fossils, so that I don't need to keep the labels directly next to the fossils. Would love to know what you think, and if anyone wants more information/the template I created. Thanks! P.S. Two of my I.D.s I'm still not 100% on (deltadromeus and Pectinodon) and I don't want anyone to assume I've completely I.D.ed them. Thanks!
  15. Dirk the Triceratops in Leiden

    So the new museum of Naturalis Biodiversity Centre in Leiden, the Netherlands was opened the past weekend and besides having a completely new building and a bunch of new stuff. The T. rex Trix is also back from being on tour in our new dedicated dinosaur hall. But I wanted to share something particular and I'll leave showing the rest of the new museum to others. I volunteer at the museum in the dinosaur prep lab, and over the past years the dino lab team has been prepping away at a whole bunch of Triceratops horridus specimens. It was originally found in 2013 when the museum was looking for a T. rex. Instead they found a number of Triceratops bones in Wyoming. Still wanting a T. rex they looked on. Eventually this T. rex was to be what became the Trix specimen. One of the most complete T. rexes in the world. After getting the T. rex the museum went back to the first location to start digging up those Triceratops bones. It later turned out to be probably the biggest collection of post cranial bones of Triceratops ever found divided between two sites right next to each other. I joined the team about 3 years ago. At first we were just prepping a variety of the bones to see just what we had. It was soon decided that we'd prep one of the skeletons from the upper site and mount that in the new upcoming museum. In the upper site we only had 2 individuals so that it would be easier to distinguish between the different individuals as one of them was much smaller. And now the skeleton is done and standing proud in the new museum. The specimen, now named Dirk, was named for one of the volunteers. There's quite a few bones present. All of the remains were found disarticulated and we don't have a complete skull. We have the braincase, one brow horn, left squamosal, left quadrate, right quadratojugal, both nasals and both dentaries, left articular complex as well as the rostral beak. For the large limb bones we have almost all of them. We're only missing the coracoids and the left ulna. Most of the toe bones as missing but we have a few of the hind toe bones. We have partial vertebrae of most of the back and around half the ribs. The sacrum is missing but the rest of the pelvis has all the real bones. For the tail we only have a single vert and chevron. Personally I've mostly worked on the skull bones such as the nasals and dentary as well as vertebrae. I also did some putty work on the arm bones. All of the missing bones were 3d printed. The scans are mostly based on the Lane specimen. And who knows, maybe we'll have a few more Triceratops skeletons mounted in the future. But there's still a lot of prepping to do.
  16. Triceratops Lower Beak Section

    From the album Lance fm. Microsite Finds

    One of my coolest finds from the Lance formation, I found this back in 2017 but this is the first time posting an image of it on the forum. Triceratops sp. Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian~ 66 mya) Lance formation
  17. NYT article, with video, covers the uncovering of a triceratops skull in North Dakota badlands. Cool side story of one of the discoverers losing chance at internship in So. Cal., La Brea Tar Pits, and gutting out excavation in the badlands. Enjoy. Alice (Triceratops) in Badland
  18. https://us.cnn.com/2019/07/24/us/triceratops-skull-discovery-trnd/index.html
  19. Hello everyone, I’m looking at a partial triceratops frill with tooth in original matrix. I only have very little experience with teeth and vertebrae. Would love to know what everyone’s thoughts are on it and if this is authentic or not? Wyoming, montana Hell Creek formation.
  20. My Collection

    New to collecting and this site, thought I’d debut my small collection in my first post. Any comments or tips would be appreciated.
  21. I recently came across the young earth theory (the theory that earth is 10.000 years old and dinosaurs coexisted with humans and traveled with Noah and his ark) and of course i thought it was unfeasible but one common argument they keep having is why are we finding soft tissues, proteins and other biochemicals in fossils like triceratops, t-rex and other dinosaur bones of course that doesn't mean DNA BUT they shouldn't have been preserved because such biochemicals don't get preserved after so much time. Another one is that some old fossils are still close to the surface when they should be buried really deep. So what are your thoughts on these arguments, in my opinion this theory is ridiculous but i'd love to learn the answers. Thanks (PS sorry for asking that many questions these days its just that im new to the forum and have lots of questions)
  22. Hi there guys! Found this teeth in the internet and wanted to know if they are real Triceratops tooth. Is it possible to tell? Thanks in advance, Juliano
  23. What do you guys think about nanotyrannus? I thought it is a juvie tyrannosaurus but it's hands were bigger
  24. Hello all, I was at my local rock shop and I noticed there was a Triceratops jaw for sale. I am curious about if it is genuine or if it has any repairs. The teeth look like they were inserted. I don't see myself buying it, but I would like to know what other forum members think about the jaw. Sorry I don't have any better photos. It was behind a glass case.
×