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Found 1,273 results

  1. Hey fossil friends! I decided not to get the cambopallas trilobite and instead found this nankinolithus and adore its body plan! What do you think?
  2. Trilobite head, maybe more?

    I got a little curious with one of the pieces I won in the end of year auction. Got a bunch of nice stuff from @Pagurus & one was wrapped in foil (thought I got sent leftover turkey surprise or something). Nice sized chunk of rock from Deep Springs Road that had splits here & there. Anyhoo, back to the curious part. I tried (carefully) to split it along some of the areas & one small piece had what I originally thought at 1st glance was the impression of a gastropod until I looked again. Then I looked at the area it came off of & found the head (at least) of a small trilobite. I had to glue the right eye back on with a bit of rubber cement as I don't currently have any super glue. It literally fell off when I blew some dust off. I took a few pics, 2 of the impression & 3 more of the trilo-head, one showing the rock behind it more. Has some really nice definition on the eyes. 1st 2 pics are the impression. Can I get an I.D please?
  3. Okay so I found this specimen at the Taughannock Falls in Ithaca New York. I found it at the edge of the gorge which consists of Shale, composed of slit and clay that fell onto lime mud and hardened into rock. I've done some research and it appears to be a Brittle star trace fossil formed by their arm grazing the sand floor. Although, these Brittle Star fish traces are known as "Pteridichnites biseriatus" and they have only been discovered so far in upper Devonian shales out in western and eastern Virginia. I'm not an expert but to my knowledge the Ithaca geological formation is Devonian and was slowly covered by sand. Is it possible that the Brittle Star fish once roamed in the ancient sea now known as "Taughannock falls" today? Because a research team is trying to find this specimen and they are wondering if anyone has discovered it. Edit: Im referring to the dotted trackway. check this link out for more information. http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/www/news/Pteridichnites.htm
  4. Tsinania trilobite China - info?

    I got this from the usual place but it came with very little info (the page might have had the info but I failed to write it down and now I can't find anything on it... I sense that it will be another one of those hours-long sleuthing sessions, so I thought it's easier to ask here ) All I know is, Tsinania sp, China. I gather it's Upper Cambrian. No idea of the formation or specific location within China. Very soft powdery matrix! I can try some better pics if required.
  5. Hi, prob a newby question. But while I was trawling on the net, I noticed that Trilobites from different regions of the world are different colours. For eg: Morocco - black Russia - sandy brown China - sandy brown Is there a reason for this?
  6. Ductina vietnamica

    From the album Trilobites

  7. Hypostome Identified

    Hello! I just came across almost a complete hypostome and a larger wing of the mouth line on a smaller hash plate. Didn't know it until I broke down the matrix. The more I chip away at the plate the more minor trilobite pieces I am finding...which is not unusual. Is there any suggestions on how to categorize and store these??? Sorry for the snarge picture.... Still need lighting in my new manpad.
  8. Hello to everyone, I was trying to put together a plan for a spring or summer trip hunting fossils. I am particularly interested in the animals of mahantango formation and would like to know if anyone is familiar with some public locations that allow people to hunt for the fossils from that formation, or at least do not prohibit this. If anyone can point me in the right direction that would be greatly appreciated, Thank you.
  9. Michigan rest stop

    Just beforehand my exit on the highway, I really needed to use the restroom, and pulled off at a rest area. This was quite lucky, since there was a very large piece of shale sitting in front. The whole thing was a giant hash plate. It was heavily weathered though and there were a bunch of fragments strewn around. I ended up finding quite a few nice pieces in the debris on the ground. Here's the rock and a closeup.
  10. This being my second attempt at restoration, I still have a lot to learn. I thought I'd showcase my attempt here as I continue to practice and (hopefully) improve my skills. The trilobite selected for this attempt is a common Eldredgeops rana from Penn Dixie. I have tons of these common ones, so it wouldn't be the end of the world if I botched it. This one came out of some harder Windom matrix, and a lot of the left side and pygidium were lost. It also is an unattractive specimen on account of it having a bit too much "character" (i.e., serious crush damage, twisted, and as if stepped on by some Devonian boot). Both genals are folded underneath, the whole bug lists to one side, and the glabella is crushed. In other words, a perfect candidate for a resto attempt. Here is roughly how it looked before I took on this task:
  11. My First Fossil

    Proud to present my first fossil :-)
  12. Unidentified Trilobite from Southern Nevada

    From the album Purchased/Gift Fossils

    A very cheap pickup from the auction site. No information other than Nevada given.

    © 2019 T. Jones

  13. Hello fossil friends! While looking for some unique species to add to my collection, I came across this Cambropallas and was wondering if it looked mostly genuine or heavily restored? I know near complete specimens are hard to come by, but this seller says the trilobite was a part of their personal collection at one point and they took pride in it. Thank you
  14. Geesops schlotheimi

    From the album Trilobites

    Collected about 50 years ago from the classic "trilobite fields." Gerolstein, Eifel mountains in Germany, Ahrdorf Formation, Flesten Member. I'm told this site is no longer available for collecting.
  15. Illaenus sinuatus

    From the album Trilobites

  16. There are several expert preparators who eke out a living collecting and preparing their finds. There are those finds that are just too problematic to deal with, and so get tossed into the chuck pile for whatever reason: missing parts, discolouration from mineralization, compaction damage, or just too time consuming to make good ROI. Some of them will offer up these B-grade pieces for sale for relatively cheap so that folks like me who don't have access to some sites can give it a whirl and get much needed prep practice. One of my main goals of preparation is to learn something new each time, which isn't hard as I've only been preparing with air tools on occasion for a little over a year. I get to learn how to approach different species, challenges, matrix types, try out different techniques, and -- the best teacher of all -- by making mistakes. So this was the piece I acquired cheaply, a Illaenus sinuatus. The specimen came out, as a good number of them do, in pieces and was glued together in the field with good Russian glue. There was a preparation attempt, but it was likely decided it wasn't worth the time to pursue this one given its many problems.
  17. Sometimes the name just fits

    I made another day at my favorite hunting site. A cold and wet day. Didnt score anything really noticable, but this fat boy : Ectillaenus giganteus, who is actually "giganteus", complete and not that streched !
  18. I'm a fairly novice preparator and I was wondering if some of you more experienced folks could help me out a bit. I am working on a dipleura that unfortunately broke apart upon extraction. Some fragments of the pygidium were lost. I have the imprint and was considering casting the missing parts in plaster or something ideally reversible. My goal is to turn this fossil into a nice display piece. There are also some large voids in the matrix I would like to fill in. I've never done anything of this sort to a fossil before and I was hoping for some guidance on materials, techniques, etc. I have attached a couple of photos of the areas I would like to repair.
  19. Wenndorfia planus

    From the album Trilobites

    L. Devonian - Jbel Boulschral, Tafilalt, Morocco
  20. Nileus armadillo

    From the album Trilobites

    Ordovician - Haellekis, Sweden
  21. Pliomera fischeri

    From the album Trilobites

    Ordovician - Kinnekulle, Sweden
  22. Paralejurus dormitzeri

    From the album Trilobites

    Middle Devonian Hamar Laghdad Fm, Alnif, Morocco
  23. Christmas Dipleura!

    After Christmas morning everyone was preoccupied with their new gifts, so I slipped out of the house for a couple of hours to visit the Cole Hill Road site in hopes of finding a nice Christmas dipleura. The site was covered in snow and I had to hack away a large amount of frozen overburden. Overall, the rock was fairly barren until the last slab I turned over. Underneath that slab was a complete, prone D. dekayi! Unfortunately it turned into a bit of a jigsaw puzzle upon extraction despite my best efforts and I believe a couple fragments of the pygidium were lost in the slush and mud. L --> R In situ, fossil with scale, the fossil in full view, Cole Hill Rd. site covered with snow- I was digging on the shelf between the two cliffs I'll post more pictures once the jigsaw puzzle is reassembled and the fossil is prepped.
  24. With the mild December weather, I decided to squeeze in one more collecting trip before the end of the year. I contacted a few friends and we hopped in the car and made a six hour trek from the Chicagoland area down to Northern Kentucky. We decided to collect a huge roadcut outside of Maysville Kentucky. The cut is well known to collectors of Cincinnatian aged fossils. Many beautiful crinoids, edrioasteroids and other rare Ordovician fauna have been found at this site. The cut is enormous and is quite overwhelming to a first time collector. I have not done much collecting in the Cincinnatian but had had a chance to briefly visit this site once before and it looked promising. The site cuts through several formations of the Cincinnatian. From bottom to top, it exposes the Kope, Fairview and Bellevue Formations. My main goal was to hopefully find a rare edrioasteroid. We initially concentrated on the upper layers in the Bellevue. We had already had some luck earlier in the day with echinoderms. We had stopped at a smaller cut on our way to the site that exposed the Kope Formation. My friend found 2 nice slabs with well preserved examples of the Crinoid Ectenocaris with stems and calyx’s preserved. Unfortunately, we did not have much luck locating any Edrioasteroids. I decided to head down the cut and do a little prospecting in the Fairview. Almost immediately, I stumbled upon my best find ever in the Cincinnatian! I was looking at pieces of shale when I was stunned to see a slab covered in trilobites! For those who have not collected in the Cincinnatian, finding any trilobites other then Flexicalymene and Isotelus is a rare occurrence. A collector is likely to only find isolated parts of some of the rarer types. The trilobites that you do find are normally individuals and likely enrolled. After closer inspection, I was amazed to see that the trilobites that were preserved on this slab appeared to be examples of Ceraurus milleranus! All appear to be prone and some are even piled on top of each other. Finding one complete Ceraurus in the Cincinnatian would be considered an amazing and very rare find. In all, we collected over twenty in various stages of growth ranging from a tiny 1/4 inch example to one nearly two inches in length. The slabs need to be cleaned and prepped but I am attaching a picture of one of the unfinished pieces. I will add more pictures to this post once everything is prepped. We found some other nice fossils that day that I will post as well.
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