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Found 813 results

  1. Upper Cambrian mortality plate

    Hello.I found in my collection another very problematic piece. It was found in Tømte, Ringsaker district in Norway. This upper Cambrian black bituminous shale formation contains some anthraconite concretions and layers. This anthraconite or black bituminous limestone also called stinkstone because of characteristic smell when hammered is full of cephalons and pygidiums. Finally after few hours of research I choose two zones of Olenids. First is Olenus & Agnostus obesus zone, subzone Wahl ( Olenus wahlenbergi). Second choice is Agnostus pisiformis zone with Olenus alpha. In my opinion specimen below coming from Olenus wahlenbergi and Agnostus obesus zone. Any hints and other ideas will be very helpful.
  2. Upper Cambrian mortality plate

    Hello.I found in my collection another very problematic piece. It was found in Tømte, Ringsaker district in Norway. This upper Cambrian black bituminous shale formation contains some anthraconite concretions and layers. This anthraconite or black bituminous limestone also called stinkstone because of characteristic smell when hammered is full of cephalons and pygidiums. Finally after few hours of research I choose two zones of Olenids. First is Olenus & Agnostus obesus zone, subzone Wahl ( Olenus wahlenbergi). Second choice is Agnostus pisiformis zone with Olenus alpha. In my opinion specimen below coming from Olenus wahlenbergi and Agnostus obesus zone. Any hints and other ideas will be very helpful.
  3. a) Agerina ? If yes, whats the Fezouata species?
  4. Yorkshire Fossils

    Hello all! I'm planning to go to UK next year someday and find some fossils at the yorkshire coast areas. Any suggestions on what time to go next year for the best 'loot'? And, what tools should I prepare and bring there? Besides, what can I find besides ammonites?
  5. It was only 9 days since my previous (and first) trip to HH, but I was itching to go back and decided to take advantage of the mild weather this Monday. I spent most of the day on the north side of the south pit picking tiny fossils out of the mud. There are an astonishing variety of critters to find if you don't mind lying face down in the dirt. 1. Tiny trilobites! I was not expecting to find any trilobites until I spotted the guy on the left. Luckily I had a small ziplock bag or I would have lost these for sure. They are about 2.5 and 3.0 mm across the head. 2. Nautiloids Fragments like these are most common after brachiopod and crinoid bits 3. Ammonites/goniatites Also very common but one of my favorites, I will never find enough of these. 4. Brachiopods and bivalves Fragments everywhere but a bit harder to find complete 5. Another brach Nothing special, just nicely inflated and good detail on both sides 6. Another brach A little more interesting. I only found one like this. 7. Gastropod I found many fragments that suggest this shape but this one is by far the most compete. 8. Crinoid stem fragments Very abundant but these ones caught my eye 9. Part of a crinoid calyx? (opposite sides of the same piece shown) 10. Cystoid plates Could be wrong, I just learned about cystoids so I'm bound to imagine seeing them everywhere
  6. Hello guys, hope everybody is fine. today some doubts about the authenticity of some specimens here. At the same time, help on the correct ID of them will be apreciated. In your opinion, is this a composite or just a bad preparation? Thanks in advance, Miguel Pais
  7. Phacops Trilobite Fossil, Morocco a.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Phacops Trilobite Fossil Morocco Middle Devonian 393-383 million years ago Phacops is a genus of trilobites in the order Phacopida, family Phacopidae, that lived in Europe, northwestern Africa, North and South America and China from the Early until the very end of the Devonian, with a broader time range described from the Late Ordovician. It was a rounded animal, with a globose head and large eyes, and probably fed on detritus. Phacops is often found rolled up, a biological defense mechanism that is widespread among smaller trilobites but further perfected in this genus. Like in all sighted Phacopina, the eyes of Phacops are compounded of very large, separately set lenses without a common cornea (so called schizochroal eyes), and like almost all other Phacopina, the articulate mid-length part of the body (or thorax) in Phacops has 11 segments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Phacopida Family: †Phacopidae Genus: †Phacops
  8. Gift trilobite

    Hopefully we'll have better luck with this one than my last post This is a trilobite which I was given as a Christmas gift many years ago. I haven't the slightest idea where it may have come from, but I think it may be from the order Phacopida. If anyone can tell what it is as well as where/when it could be from I would greatly appreciate it! More pictures:
  9. Trilobites are mysterious creatures - after so many years they still have some secrets http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5155559/Experts-uncover-530-million-year-old-trilobite-fossil.html
  10. Disorganized chaos

    Well I got a new phone (Samsung Galaxy Note 8) on Black Friday and was playing with it snapping some pictures. Those of you that have been to my house know that I am totally disorganized and definitely need to organize my fossils. Thought I would share some of the disorganized chaos that is my basement fossil dumping area. This tends to be where fossils go to rest if they do not make it to the glass display cases (3) upstairs where I put the good stuff. But then that is a step up from the ones that never get out of the map drawers and boxes in the garage. One of these days I will get around to organizing things, just never happens to be today....... I suspect my kids will end up having to organize it someday......... (That's a scary thought)
  11. trilobite cast?

    Good evening, I found this along a creek bed near Austin, Texas and was curious what y'all think it might be. This creek has shark teeth, urchins, and mollusks throughout. Thanks
  12. My first Trilobite

    Bought this lil guy today at the rock show. He's about 2 1/4 inch long. Still has a lot of its face covered. Anyone know his breed so I can narrow down his name and birthday and is it possible to clean him up any more than he is without harm. Kinda looks like a puppy,lol
  13. This ones a keeper

    Contrary to what some people may suspect I actually collected other things besides cystoids and echinoderms this past summer. Here is a trilobite that I am quite fond of that was found back in July. It was found in a blast of Ordovician Verulam. Took me a good 1/2 hour to get it cut out. It was in a very large slab that was a bit awkwardly positioned and I could not move it by myself. Both of my regular collecting buddies had already packed it in for the day so I was on my own to figure out how to get it out. Definitely worth the effort. It prepped up quite nicely in my humble opinion and best yet it was mine and not someone elses. Seemed to be always working on other peoples stuff this season. Just the two left rear most pleura were partially missing on this one. Have been debating whether or not to restore them. On the positive side it is 7 cm in length, so a very decent size. I suspect that this one is going to end up in my personal collection. As they say it is a keeper. For those of you that do not recognize this bug it is a Failleana indeterminata which are definitely a rarity in this locality. I have only ever seen in person one other prone complete specimen found here and that one sold for quite a bit of money. Personally I think this one is nicer. Alas found in July, prepped in September and October this one is not a candidate for IFOTM.
  14. Asaphid ID

    Is it possible to determine the exact species of the spiny field Asaphus sp. From Essemara Atlas Mountains in Morocco? Trilobite is approximately 5" LONG BY 3&1/2" .
  15. Likely wrong ID

    I have this trilobites and is labeled as a Kainops williamsi. I could not find any trilobites by this name. I'm pretty sure it's mislabeled. Based on a review of trilobites from the area I believe this to be a Kainops invius
  16. Kane, Debbie and Shamalama

    Just recently finished doing these for a few Fossil Forum members (Kane and Shamalama) Likely wont be seeing them for a bit so I thought they would like to see their bugs and knew neither would mind me posting them. None were pristine but a little prep helped.... First are a pair that belong to Kane and Debbie The second belongs to Shamalama
  17. Hello, bug lovers! I found some pretty cool trilobites this last Sunday at my favorite road cut in Wisconsin. Since I'm a bit of a noob with bugs I'd appreicate some help on IDs and a confirmation on the formation. I think this is the Platteville formation. But it could be Decorah.....? @piranha Sorry for the pics in advance. Lol Found as is. After a bit of prep. Gabriceraurus mifflinensis? Ceraurinella scofieldi (possibly more thorax)? Continued..........
  18. ID help for two Trilobites I found...

    Okay, so I had some free time while I was working in the mid Atlantic States so I decided to sneak in a quick collecting trip to Virginia. I’m hoping someone can tell me what type of Trilo this is before I prep it out. It’s my winter project i also have a question on ID for another Trilo imprint I found earlier this summer but haven’t had a chance to post it. This one is from New York, it was a random road cut that I stopped at to have some lunch and happened to notince these in the rocks....of course I brought them home! Pictures to follow These are the two pieces from New York
  19. Calymente tristani Trilobite.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Calymene tristani Trilobite Jebel Issoumour, Alnif, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Age (444-486 Million Years Ago) Calymene (meaning beautiful crescent as a reference to the glabella) is a genus of trilobites in the order Phacopida that are found throughout North America, North Africa, and Europe in primarily Silurian outcrops. Calymene is closely related to Flexicalymene, and both genera are frequently found inrolled. Calymene trilobites are small, typically 2 cm in length. Their cephalon is the widest part of the animal, and the thorax is usually in 13 segments. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Phacopida Family: †Calymenidae Genus: †Calymene Species: †tristani
  20. 5 day straight out in ohio. Getting better at pinpointing where to look! Pick up a rock and thought maybe a fern but i think i see a little tail spike maybe. Is this a Trilobite? And if it is should i try and clean it up at all or leave it?
  21. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Declivolithus alfredi Trilobite SITE LOCATION: Ourzazate, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Era (443 to 485 million years ago) Here is a FAINT VERY RARE and absolutely 100% natural Declivolithus cf. alfredi Trilobite Fossil specimen that was found near Ourzazate, Morocco. Trinucleidae is a family of small to average size asaphid trilobites that first occurred at the start of the Ordovician and became extinct at the end of that period. It contains approximately 227 species divided over 51 genera in 5 subfamilies. Trinucleidae is an extinct family of fast-moving low-level epifaunal suspension feeders. Description of the Family: Cephalic fringe broad, sloping outward, with numerous pits on external surfaces. Occipital ring convex. Thorax with six segments,deep apodemal pits in articulating furrows. Pygidium triangular, length 0.25 to 0.5 of width; axis with many rings; pleural fields with shallow pleural furrows. Glabella and genae may have articulate pattern of raised edges. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Asaphida Family: †Trinucleidae Genus: †Declivolithus Species: †alfredi
  22. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Declivolithus alfredi Trilobite SITE LOCATION: Ourzazate, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Era (443 to 485 million years ago) Here is a FAINT VERY RARE and absolutely 100% natural Declivolithus cf. alfredi Trilobite Fossil specimen that was found near Ourzazate, Morocco. Trinucleidae is a family of small to average size asaphid trilobites that first occurred at the start of the Ordovician and became extinct at the end of that period. It contains approximately 227 species divided over 51 genera in 5 subfamilies. Trinucleidae is an extinct family of fast-moving low-level epifaunal suspension feeders. Description of the Family: Cephalic fringe broad, sloping outward, with numerous pits on external surfaces. Occipital ring convex. Thorax with six segments,deep apodemal pits in articulating furrows. Pygidium triangular, length 0.25 to 0.5 of width; axis with many rings; pleural fields with shallow pleural furrows. Glabella and genae may have articulate pattern of raised edges. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Asaphida Family: †Trinucleidae Genus: †Declivolithus Species: †alfredi
  23. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Declivolithus alfredi Trilobite SITE LOCATION: Ourzazate, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Era (443 to 485 million years ago) Here is a FAINT VERY RARE and absolutely 100% natural Declivolithus cf. alfredi Trilobite Fossil specimen that was found near Ourzazate, Morocco. Trinucleidae is a family of small to average size asaphid trilobites that first occurred at the start of the Ordovician and became extinct at the end of that period. It contains approximately 227 species divided over 51 genera in 5 subfamilies. Trinucleidae is an extinct family of fast-moving low-level epifaunal suspension feeders. Description of the Family: Cephalic fringe broad, sloping outward, with numerous pits on external surfaces. Occipital ring convex. Thorax with six segments,deep apodemal pits in articulating furrows. Pygidium triangular, length 0.25 to 0.5 of width; axis with many rings; pleural fields with shallow pleural furrows. Glabella and genae may have articulate pattern of raised edges. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Asaphida Family: †Trinucleidae Genus: †Declivolithus Species: †alfredi
  24. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Declivolithus alfredi Trilobite SITE LOCATION: Ourzazate, Morocco TIME PERIOD: Ordovician Era (443 to 485 million years ago) Here is a FAINT VERY RARE and absolutely 100% natural Declivolithus cf. alfredi Trilobite Fossil specimen that was found near Ourzazate, Morocco. Trinucleidae is a family of small to average size asaphid trilobites that first occurred at the start of the Ordovician and became extinct at the end of that period. It contains approximately 227 species divided over 51 genera in 5 subfamilies. Trinucleidae is an extinct family of fast-moving low-level epifaunal suspension feeders. Description of the Family: Cephalic fringe broad, sloping outward, with numerous pits on external surfaces. Occipital ring convex. Thorax with six segments,deep apodemal pits in articulating furrows. Pygidium triangular, length 0.25 to 0.5 of width; axis with many rings; pleural fields with shallow pleural furrows. Glabella and genae may have articulate pattern of raised edges. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Arthropoda Class: †Trilobita Order: †Asaphida Family: †Trinucleidae Genus: †Declivolithus Species: †alfredi
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