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Found 1,138 results

  1. The Middle Devonian fossils of New York State are well known and have been for over 100 years. I grew up in Livingston County in whats called the Genesee River Valley. The streams that feed this river within the county are rich in Devonian fossils. I collect fossil corals, brachiopods, bryozoans, crinoids&blastoids, pelecypods, gastropods, cephalopods, phyllocarids, trilobites, fish, and wood. I rearranged my favorites in my collection and thought I would share since I feel the display will remain like this for some time. Out of the thousands of Middle Devonian fossils I have collected in 30+ years, these are the ones that mean the most to me. Thanks, Mikeymig
  2. Help With Iowa Trilobite

    This past weekend, I had a chance to collect a well known roadcut outside of Clermont Iowa. The site is Ordovician in age and exposes the Clermont section of the Maquoketa Formation. one of the interesting pieces that I collected was this tiny trilobite. As you can see from the picture,There is not much to go on however the hypostome is preserved. I am hopeful the Trilobite will be complete and was wondering if anyone might know what species it is/could be. Any help is appreciated.
  3. During the summer i found time to empty a bit crates from the recent trilo hunts. Here come some of those recent prep. The samples come from 2 different sites which are only a few kilometers away one from the other. More or less orange ones from one place, black ones from the other. To start with, the emblematic Neseuretus tristani, most common trilos in our area. Those are second grade samples, but still, here they are :
  4. Uralichas sp cephalon

    From the album La Dominelais / La Noe Blanche - a few summer prep

    Uralichas sp cephalon a trilobite from the ordovician shale of La Dominelais (Brittany / France)
  5. Neseuretus tristani - 3

    From the album La Dominelais / La Noe Blanche - a few summer prep

    Neseuretus tristani, a trilobite from the Ordovician shale of La Dominelais ( South of Rennes / Britanny / France)
  6. Neseuretus tristani - 2

    From the album La Dominelais / La Noe Blanche - a few summer prep

    Neseuretus tristani, a trilobite from the Ordovician shale of La Dominelais ( South of Rennes / Britanny / France)
  7. Neseuretus tristani - 1

    From the album La Dominelais / La Noe Blanche - a few summer prep

    Neseuretus tristani, a trilobite from the Ordovician shale of la Noe Blanche ( South of Rennes / Britanny / France)
  8. Colpocoryphe rouaulti - 2

    From the album La Dominelais / La Noe Blanche - a few summer prep

    Colpocoryphe rouaulti a trilobite from the Ordovician shale of la Noe Blanche ( South of Rennes / Britanny / France)
  9. Indet trilobite

    From the album La Dominelais / La Noe Blanche - a few summer prep

    Indet trilobite from the Ordovician shale of La Dominelais ( South of Rennes / Britanny / France) (Prolly colpocoryphe or salterocoryphe sp)
  10. Eodalmanitina sp - 2

    From the album La Dominelais / La Noe Blanche - a few summer prep

    Eodalmanitina sp, a trilobite from the Ordovician shale of La Dominelais ( South of Rennes / Britanny / France)
  11. Ectillaenus giganteus - 4

    From the album La Dominelais / La Noe Blanche - a few summer prep

    Rolled up Ectillaenus giganteus, a trilobite from the Ordovician shale of la Noe Blanche ( South of Rennes / Britanny / France)
  12. Eodalmanitina sp - 1

    From the album La Dominelais / La Noe Blanche - a few summer prep

    Eodalmanitina sp, a trilobite from the Ordovician shale of La Dominelais ( South of Rennes / Britanny / France)
  13. Ectillaenus giganteus - 3

    From the album La Dominelais / La Noe Blanche - a few summer prep

    Ectillaenus giganteus, a trilobite from the Ordovician shale of La Dominelais ( South of Rennes / Britanny / France)
  14. Ectillaenus giganteus - 2

    From the album La Dominelais / La Noe Blanche - a few summer prep

    Ectillaenus giganteus, a trilobite from the Ordovician shale of La Dominelais ( South of Rennes / Britanny / France)
  15. Ectillaenus giganteus - 1

    From the album La Dominelais / La Noe Blanche - a few summer prep

    Ectillaenus giganteus, a trilobite from the Ordovician shale of La Dominelais ( South of Rennes / Britanny / France)
  16. Colpocoryphe rouaulti - 1

    From the album La Dominelais / La Noe Blanche - a few summer prep

    Colpocoryphe rouaulti a rolled up trilobite from the Ordovician shale of la Noe Blanche ( South of Rennes / Britanny / France)
  17. Thoughts on these trilobites from Morocco found on our favorite auction site. Is there any restoration? Has any part been carved or painted? Any I do is greatly appreciated!
  18. Not the best greenops ever

    About a month ago I went to Penn with two fossil buddies and they both found prone greenops. Sadly I did not find one. However both of these greenops were split between the positive and negative and probably were missing some skin as the material was quite flaky. For one of my friends this was his first ever find of a prone greenops. Prone greenops that are nicely laid out are a very rare find in the Windom shale. Most of the ones I have found from there or others that I have prepped for people are fully, partially enrolled or distorted. So to my fossil buddy this was a bit of a special find. We wrapped up the two pieces in tin foil in the field and I agreed to take it with me and prep it for him. Well zoom ahead a month in time and I am going out with him last week to collect and he asks how is his greenops coming, whereby I realize that I have not only not started it ,but in my senility had forgotten I had it and had no clue where it was. Well when I got home it turns out that I had never unpacked the bucket of fossils from that trip and low and behold his fossil was packed just as we had left it. A careful look at both parts under the scope confirmed my opinion that the bug was in pretty rough shape , but a prone greenops, not to mention perhaps his first ever prone warranted we attempt to bring it back to life. Unfortunately I did not take any pics until a ways into the prep but here is what I did to start. 1. Washed the mud off both plates scrubbing with a tooth brush 2. Squared up what would become the fossil plate with the diamond gas saw 3. Cut out as small as possible a square from the top piece of the matrix that contained the top part of the greenops using my 7 inch tile saw with diamond blade 4. On a belt sander using aluminum oxide 120 grit thinned the top piece as much as safely possible to help minimize my prep time later. 5. Using super thin cyanoacrylate glue reattached the top portion to the main slab clamping tightly with a c-clamp. Asusual all prep was done under a zoom scope at 10x to 20x magnification using a Comco abrasion unit and in this case a German Pferd MST 31 scribe exclusively.. Not a lot of scribing was done other than to outline the bug as the skin was not in great shape. Abrasion was pretty much done with a .18 and .10 nozzle using 40 micron previously used dolomite at 30 PSI. Here is the bug after about an our of prepping . I have outlined in red where you can still see the outline of the section that was glued down. A lot of people do not realize that many of the fantastic trilobites you see on the market have actually been glued back together because the splits are often through the bug. I once did a Moroccan trilobite that was in 7 pieces when I received it Here is the bug after another 40 minutes Took some pictures of the prep but frankly they ended up too blurry to use so here is the prep after abrasion is complete and after I have repaired a lot of the parts that broke of in the split. I tend to use a white repair material and always take a picture to let the owner know what has been repaired Here is the bug after coloration applied . The repairs were allowed to cure overnight before coloration and a bit of extra carving to clean up spots.Just waiting for me to do a final cleanup tomorrow after everything has cured a bit more. A long way from being the worlds most pristine or perfect bug but I am relatively pleased that we were able to breath some new life into an ailing bug. Totally prep time about 3 1/2 hours over 4 days. I suspect the owner will be pleased with the result. I have seen people toss bugs in the field that were in this type of shape. For those of you who just need to know the bug is 27mm x 18 mm A slightly different view
  19. It was a pretty good week fossil collecting I managed to make it to Penn Dixie Tuesday and Friday. A few of us Canadians had the place to ourselves both days Tuesday was an interesting day, three of us went Mike, Greg and myself and we all ended up with heat stroke. The temperature topped out at 39 Celsius and then you add in the humidity factor and it was low 40's. Stupid weather for collecting but we all found some very good stuff. Greg found a huge plate that I cut down in the field for him to about 12 inches by 12 inches. It would appear to have 4 complete prone E. rana on it . It currently sits in my basement waiting to be prepped. I do not have a picture as of yet but if I get his permission I will post one. Mike as usual is the greenops whisperer and he found 2 or 3 relatively complete and large greenops at the top of the blocks in the main Penn trilobite layer. I was having a reasonable day I probably had 20 to 30 enrolled or partially enrolled trilobites in the bucket along with a very nice Pleurodictyum americanum (a tabulate coral) . I only find a few of these each year at Penn and always take them home because they prep up quite nicely. I was getting a bit frustrated that both Mike and Greg were finding prone rana's including Greg's spectacular plate, when my fortunes changed with one split of the rock. For those of you that have been collecting with me you know that my style is to spend the morning breaking out huge blocks from the main trilobite layer with big prybars, wedges and chisels and then I split for the whole afternoon. We were working a large bench and had gotten to the state where all the blocks were locked in because of convoluted dome structures and the lack of natural cracks. The blocks that day were coming out about 200 to 300 pounds and about 12 to 18 inches thick. Eventually I would resort to the diamond gas saw and create some weak areas that we could exploit, but back to this story. In frustration with the heat and three guys not being able to get the next block out I just took a chisel and a 5 pound mini sledge and took my frustration out on the rock. Well to my pleasant surprise off popped a piece of matrix that clearly had 2 nice bugs in it. Wow one strike of the sledge and the fortunes of the day are totally changed. I always tell people who are collecting with me to keep at it, your are only one strike of the hammer away from having an amazing day. Unfortunately I did not take any pictures in the field my phone would not let me it said the battery was over heated. Here is ta picture of the shard about 1/2 hour into prepping. What you cant notice in this picture is that there is a 3rd bug buried to the left, I was just able to see the edge of a pygidium from the side. For once I got lucky and it was not just an isolated pygidium. Here it is probably an hour into the prep Prep was pretty standard using a COMCO air abrasion unit at about 30 PSI with 40 micron previously used dolomite, utilizing .025. .015 and .010 tips. Very little scribing was used on the piece because was quite thin and looked to have weak spots that were stabilized with cyanoacrylate and dilute vinac in acetone .Anyway for your viewing pleasure here is a series of pictures of the completed bugs. The plate has no repairs or restoration and the bugs are lying in their original positions. Going into my collection besides the "Perfect Bug" I found earlier this season.
  20. Canadian Trilobite?

    I just found this guy hiding in the back of my collection. No idea how long he’s been back there, but I’m pretty sure I found him on the shores of Lake Erie, on the Canada side. Looks to be a weathers trilobite to me, possibly Isotelus, but, admittedly, I know very little about these bugs. Hopefully some of the experts out there can clear things up. Thanks! JPC
  21. How many molts?

    question - How many molts do you think it would take an Eldredgeops to go from 11mm (.43") to 64mm (2.52")?
  22. Trilobite non det

    From the album Invertebrates

    Trilobite non det. Possibly Chotecops sp. Lower Devonian Lower Emsian Bundenbach Germany length 6cm
  23. I recently had the opportunity to obtain three specimens of the famous trilobite Cambropallas at a very low price. I've always wanted one of these; preferably a real one, although the fake/restored ones also interested me, if I could find one for the right price. So this was too good an opportunity to miss. Before I say anything else, I should say that I am a long way from being a trilobite expert. I only have half a dozen cheap examples in my collection, although I am interested in Moroccan fossils in general, and the repair/restoration/forgery that you often find in fossils from this country. I'll look at each of the three specimens in turn. If anybody has anything to add, or anything they wish to correct me upon, then please do! I apologise for any incorrect terminology or flat-out wrong information I may inadvertently give. Specimen A Matrix: 27cm This trilobite was complete and undamaged. At first glance, I thought the whole thing might be a cast, because it had an unreal orange hue. The photo below was taken after I had already rinsed a section near the head under the tap, to test my hypothesis that this was some form of pigment. It was, and it revealed the black surface seen towards the top. I decided to soak the whole block, and gently brush it with a toothbrush to remove all of the pigment, which came off easily. This was the result. Far from being faked, it appears to be approximately 65% original. Clearly, much of the right-hand side and the head shield was lost, presumably in a bad split. The missing pieces are constructed from an unknown substance, perhaps some kind of modelling clay (which is how I will refer to it for the sake of argument) or soft resin. It is soft when wet and can be cut away from the fossil with a sharp knife. I was interested to see that even those parts of the trilobite that are present are still covered in the modelling clay, presumably to smooth them out and improve the overall appearance - even though, in fact, it completely obscures all of the original detail. I don't doubt that virtually all of the left side of the thorax is present beneath the clay. I believe that this part of the trilobite is probably authentic: However, it may not be quite as simple as that, as the next specimen shows.
  24. Hi All, My wife and I have recently started visiting some of the Devonian Mahantango fossil collecting areas in central and northeast Pennsylvania. Yesterday we made a trip to Beltzville State Park to do some casual collecting. After a couple of hours of collecting I came across what may be the face and eyes of an unknown trilobite. This was chiseled from a much larger piece and almost went into the waste bin! Anyway, any help with a proper ID would be much appricated. Thanks!
  25. Rockford, IL fossil sites

    Hi there I live in Sharon, WI. I am curious in want to take my kids to fossil sites to one of fossil sites as they love to look for fossils. Is there any fossil sites around Rockford, IL that I could take my kids so kids' curiousity can be satisfied. Thanks! BTW Mason Creek is too far for now.
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