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Found 490 results

  1. Iowa trip

    Just thought I'd share some finds from a club trip to the Devonian of Iowa last Sunday. It was a good trip. A nice clam. This Greenops disintegrated shortly after exposure. Crassiproetus sp. Before After. Enrolled Greenops sp. and Eldredgeops noorwoodensis Group shot
  2. Penn dixie never disappoints!

    Penn Dixie never disappoints Hubby and I went last Saturday and I got loads of goodies. I find it rather interesting how all of these trilobites came from the same small area but the way they sit is so different. I would be curious to find out About the conditions that cause the "hugging" trilobites. It's hard to see because I need to be cleaned but each little group has a couple of them , mostly belly to belly. I'm trying to clean them useing an etching pen and a soft brush but pieces keep breaking off and I'm not sure how to do it without them crumbling.
  3. Greenops Trilobites from Deep Springs Road

    From the album Middle Devonian

    Greenops Sp. Phacopid trilobites (enrolled and partially prone) Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Earlville, N.Y.
  4. Greenops Trilobite From Deep Springs Road

    From the album Middle Devonian

    Greenops sp. Phacopid Trilobite Middle Devonian Moscow Formation Windom Shale Hamilton Group Deep Springs Road Quarry Earlville, N.Y.
  5. Hi all, It's been a while since I posted a trip report but I was feeling like posting last evening as well as testing out my new photography rig. I moved houses two years ago and lost my lovely brick wall backdrop (the exterior of back of the house) which allowed photography in natural light. The new house is all vinyl siding outside and I have more shade so less opportunity for good sunlit pictures. However, one corner inside the house has a bricked area where a wood burning stove used to be so I have decided to set up some lights there. The pics came out ok so let's proceed with the report. I recently went up to the St. Mary's quarry in Bowmanville, Ontario on a scheduled trip with the local Scarborough club and also stopped off at Arkona while in Canada. I did pretty well at Arkona where I found four Eldredgeops trilobites and two Blastoids among other finds. Nucelocrinus elegans from the Hungry Hollow member of the Widder formation. Sorry, no pics of the Trilobites due to some back spasms but I got these pics of a nice Atactotoechus fruiticosus branch also from the Hungry Hollow Member of the Widder formation. Then I went to the St. Mary's quarry on Sunday where I took a tumble down the rock pile and hurt my ribs. Lucky for me my hard hat took the brunt of the impact my head made with the rocks. With nothing broken and still able to move around, I stayed closer to the ground and found this partial, eroded Isoltelus sp. that is inverted and still shows the Hypostome in place. I also found a plate with Graptolites but that was too heavy to hold and photograph last night. I'll post it tomorrow maybe. Finally, I drove home on Monday and stopped off at a place in New York where some of the Kashong Shale member of the Moscow formation is exposed and found these two surprises. A cephalon of a Dipleura dekayi with some of the shell material eroded away. I think the eye is intact and waiting to see again once some rock is removed. And here is a closeup of the shell on top where you can see the stippled pattern where sensory pits used to be. Lastly I found a pygidium that I am not sure of the genera on. Possibly a Basidechenella sp.? So not a bad trip at all, despite the injury. Good news is that I am healing nicely but still have some soreness and muscle spasms. I'm looking forward to my next trip up in the spring and hopefully will avoid the health scares.
  6. Hunting in Georgia, US?

    Hello everybody, how’s everybody doing? I am planning on flying out to the lovely state of Georgia in December and I would like to know what my options are regarding fossil hunting/ mineral collecting. I plan on flying into Atlanta, then driving to Macon. A day or two will be spent fishing on the Coast most likely around Savannah so I’ll try shark tooth hunting for sure. Nothing has been permanently decided as of yet except fishing. Now I know there is shark teeth on the Coast as I already mentioned but I know there’s maybe trilobites somewhere and that there’s certain places with garnet sand. I also know that the water level in the rivers out there get higher in the winter if I remember correctly. Will that stop me from being able to hunt for teeth and/or trilobites? It would be most appreciated if anybody could PM me with some rough locations or formations for me to research. Also any tips on beach collecting would be great as I haven’t tried it yet. Thanks!
  7. This may seem like an obvious question but I’ve always wondered what specific structural differences are present between a Greenops and a Bellacartwrightia. Any help would be appreciated!
  8. Hey everyone! I finally had a day to go out and enjoy a Saturday fossil hunting with no time limit!! I decided to check 2 middle Devonian locations that have yielded nice dipleura specimens in the past. I’m still looking for “that one” specimen....eventually I’ll find one. I didn’t find the trilobite I tasked myself to find but I did find awesome stuff on Saturday . So here is a little trip report from Saturday September 28, 2019 plus some extra stuff I found earlier in the month. I’ll throw it in at the end. I got up really early so I could get to Cole Hill by sunrise. I had 2 sites in mind from the start. My new house is now only 30 minutes away from CHR which was a nice surprise! Early morning view I’ve had some tough outings at Cole Hill. This rock is so hard!!! I’ve tried clearing overburden just to get to more immovable rock. Anytime I get things moving I find something decent so that was the goal. Find rock that moves!! I ended up finding a spot way off the main outcrop and I got to work. I immediately found a plate with 5 cephalons!! It’s not being very photogenic so I took a picture after making them wet. the right shot shows 4 cephalons stacked in between the white scale bars....the left one shows the 5 hidden cephalon that Is under another cephalon. The bottom piece is just a cheek but could continue I’m not sure. Not very photogenic but rare to find an assemblage like that. I was able to find an area with more weathered rock and I found around a dozen cephalons!!! These are the better and bigger ones. I have a few nice juveniles but they are half covered in rock. I liked these 2 a lot. The left one is very 3D (also came in 10 pieces lol) and the right one has all the cephalon margins intact!! some nicer pygidiums I found. I found 7-10 total in various conditions. I found a lot of associated fauna as well!! The Gastropods came from mostly one bedding plane. The same spot I found the cephalon hash plate these were not far behind littered all over. I also found a bunch of bivalves! Way more than I usually do. I collected more on this trip than I have in the past. The rock kept moving and I kept finding!! After I worked the shelf back far enough I decided I wasn’t going to try and find a new spot. 4 hours of collecting and it was time to go to Deep Springs Rd. Even though I didn’t find exactly what I was after I found lots of amazing specimens compared to past trips . Kept my finder crossed that DSR would be as kind. DSR next post.....
  9. Barely a month had gone by since my last trip to New Mexico and Colorado, but I already had plans for this trip in the works. Primary focus this time, which was a solo trip, was fossil collecting, visiting well known sites that have been on my radar for quite some time. I flew out to Salt Lake City and drove directly to Kemmerer, WY. My first stop there was Fossil Butte National Monument: Here is a view of the visitors center (free admission) and the surrounding barren, but awesome landscape that surrounds it:
  10. Well I decided to stop again at the Garage Sale at an ESCONI members house. It had been a rainy night and before it opened at 10 am I along with another gentleman helped the owners daughter remove tarps that were covered with a lot of water. After that, I and a number of others began to look around for new items that had been placed outside since last week. I found a couple things that caught my eye, I don’t know if the prices are good for a couple things that I purchased , but it was to help the owner and I was willing to pay the price that I did. These trilobites appear to be from the Ordovician of New York, but I would not be surprised if they came from Canada, maybe @Kane can confirm. For these pieces I paid $130.00 I believe that they are Ceraurus and Isotelus. I got 3 Ceraurus- And then these Isotelus. I also got this box of Agatized Coral from Florida for $50, I have never owned a piece of this. To be continued-
  11. I will be receiving soon what looks to be a large youngshunensis trilobite, while I am aware of fakes from china I'm not sure if specimens of this trilobite like this just have real rough prep work done to them or if maybe there is some sort of carving involved. Any knowledgeable feedback to whether its a keeper or not will be greatly appreciated, always wanted to nab one of these.
  12. Fossil Road Trip - Georgia, Texas

    Both my brother and I celebrated graduations this year - my brother graduated from college and I graduated from law school. In celebration of our graduations, we decided to take a 13-day road trip to see some of the United States after I had taken the bar exam but before I began work. Our journey ultimately took us through Atlanta, New Orleans, Houston, San Antonio, Austin, Oklahoma City, St. Louis, Dayton and Pittsburgh, before returning home. Our days were jam-packed, with us often not arriving at a hotel until 9/10pm, but along the way we did find some time to make a few quick stops to collect some fossils in Georgia and Texas. My brother is not a collector, but I was really excited to try to find some examples of the infamous Georgia trilobites, Texas echinoids and Texas ammonites. I want to thank @BobWill, @smt126, @facehugger, and @JamieLynn for answering my innumerable questions about Texas fossils. We ultimately did not have enough time to check out all of the places you suggested, but I will certainly store the knowledge for my next trip - hopefully in cooler weather. Our first stop was at Tibbs Bridge in Chatsworth, GA. Having heard the rumors about the potential illegality of the site I was a little worried when we arrived. We could not initially find parking and when we pulled off, we picked the wrong spot. The homeowner we parked near came out yelling at us about collecting beneath the bridge and threatening to call the police. Having driven all the way from New Jersey I was not yet ready to give up on the trip. We decided to pick another spot to park and given that my brother doesn't collect, he waited in the car in case something happened. We could not stay at the site for longer than 90 minutes, so I tried to find as much as I could. As a funny aside, I was soon joined by another group of collectors from Georgia, one of whom had recently spent time in my hometown in New Jersey. Small world! I was hoping to find some better preserved trilobites, but I had to ultimately settle with some nice impressions and a couple of smaller fragments of exoskeleton. I did find one large trilobite that still had all of its exoskeleton, but it was fractured and I could not put it back together even at home. I was able to keep the impression of the trilobite though. All of what I found were Aphelaspis brachyphasis. And the large trilobite whose exoskeleton was simply too damaged to repair
  13. This is a work in progress, a kind of "master list" of trilobite species found in Ontario according to the available literature. In some cases, stratigraphy and taxonomic names have been modernized. Correlations are added where it is expected that species found in equivalent strata could be found in Ontario rocks. I have not included trilobites from the Hudson/James Bay area as there are a number of species there that still are in need of formal description. There are also a number of uncertainties that require more literature support before they are included here. I'll update this as more resources come available. UPDATED: Sept 15, 2019 Period Formation/Member Taxon Correlated Species Devonian Kettle Point (1) Eldredgeops rana Widder (upper) (6) Greenops widderensis Eldredgeops rana Pseudodechenella ?rowi Dipleura dekayi Crassiproetus canadensis Bellacartwrightia jennyae Widder (Hungry Hollow) (5) Greenops widderensis Eldredgeops rana Eldredgeops iowensis southworthi Pseudodechenella arkonensis Crassiproetus canadensis Arkona (3) Stummiana arkonensis Eldredgeops rana Pseudodechenella arkonensis Dundee (8) Coronura aspectans Coronura myrmecophorus Trypaulites calypso Crassiproetus crassimarginatus Eldredgeops rana Pseudodechenella planimarginata Pseudodechenella rowi Odontocephalus selenurus Crassiproetus sibleyensis (Michigan) Pseudodechenella nodosa (Ohio) Lucas (1) Crassiproetus crassimarginatus Amherstburg (5) Acanthopyge contusa Mannopyge Halli Mystrocephala stummi Crassiproetus crassimarginatus Harpidella sp. Coniproetus folliceps (New York) Bois Blanc (8) Terataspis grandis Anchiopsis anchiops Burtonops cristata Crassiproetus crassimarginatus Pseudodechenella planimarginata Otarion sp. Calymene platys Trypaulites erinus Silurian Guelph (2) Bumastus ioxus Bumastus aboynensis Eramosa (1) Encrinurus ornatus Amabel (8) Calymene niagarensis Calymene sp. Kosovopeltis acamus Planiscutellum rochesterense Ekwanoscutellum ekwanensis Hadromeros niagarensis Bumastus ioxus Sphaerexochus romingeri Rochester (8) Dicranopeltis fragosa Dalmanites limulurus Trimerus delpinocephalus Arctinurus boltoni Calymene niagarensis Calymene sp. Liocalymene clintoni Bumastus ioxus Decoroproetus corycoeus (New York) Diacalymene sp. (New York) Illaenus insignis (New York) Radnoria bretti (New York) Fossil Hill (1) Bumastus ioxus Cataract (5) Acernaspis spp. Leonaspis cf. illinoiensis Calymene niagarensis Calymene sp. Liocalymene clintoni Ordovician Georgian Bay (7) Ceraurus sp. Ceraurinus sp. Cryptolithus bellulus Flexicalymene granulosa Proetus chambliensis (Carlsbad Fm) Isotelus maximus Triarthrus sp. Blue Mountain/Billings (11) Ceraurus sp. Cryptolithus bellulus Isotelus sp. Flexicalymene sp. Pseudogygites latimarginatus Sphaerocorphye robusta Triarthrus canadensis Triarthrus eatoni Triarthrus glaber Triarthrus rougensis Triarthrus spinosus Lindsay (28) Amphiichas ottawaensis Anataphrus sinclairi Calyptaulax callicephalus Ceraurinella trentonensis Ceraurinus marginatus Ceraurinus serratus Ceraurus matranseris Ceraurus milleranus Cryptolithus sp. Eobronteus sp. Erratencrinurus vigilans Failleana indeterminata Flexicalymene croneisi Flexicalymene senaria Hibbertia ottawaensis Hypodicranotus strialatus Isotelus latus Isotelus “mafritzae” ( A & B ) Isotelus ottawaensis Leviceraurus mammiloides Meadowtownella trentonensis Otarion laurentinum Physemataspis pernodosus Pseudogygites latimarginatus Sceptasps lincolnensis Thaleops depressicapitata Thaleops latiaxiata Thaleops laurentiana Verulam (41) Achatella achates Amphilichas ottawaensis Anataphrus sinclairi Bathyrus (Raymondites) ingalli Bufoceraurus bispinosus Bumastoides bellevillensis Bumastoides billingsi Bumastoides milleri Calyptaulax callicephalus Ceraurus globulobatus Ceraurus milleranus Ceraurus plattinensis Ceraurus pleurexanthemus Ceraurinella sp. Ceraurinella trentonensis Cybeloides plana Cyphoproetus wilsonae Dimeropyge gibbus Dolichoharpes reticulata Ectenaspis homalonotoides Eobronteus sp. Eomonorachus intermedius Erratencrinus vigilans Failleana indeterminata Flexicalymene senaria Gabriceraurus dentatus Hemiarges leviculus Hemiarges paulianus Hibbertia ottawaensis Hypodicranotus striatulus Isotelus gigas Isotelus iowensis Isotelus ottawaensis Kawina trentonensis Meadowtownella trentonensis Otarion laurentinum Physemataspis pernodosus Sceptaspis lincolnensis Sphaerocoryphe robusta Thaleops ovata Thaleops laurentiana Bobcaygeon (32) Amphilichas ottawaensis Apianurus sp. Bathyrus (Raymondites) ingalli Bathyrus (Raymondites) trispinosus Bufoceraurus bispinosus Bumastoides milleri Calyptaulax callicephalus Ceraurus globulobatus Ceraurus plattinensis Ceraurus pleurexanthmeus Ceratocephala sp. Ceraurinella sp. Ceraurinella trentonensis Cybeloides plana Cyphoproetus wilsonae Diacanthaspis parvula Dolichoharpes reticulate Ectenaspis homalonotoides Eomonorachus intermedius Erratencrinus vigilans Failleana indeterminata Flexicalymene senaria Gabriceraurus dentata Hemiarges paulianus Isotelus gigas Isotelus iowensis Meadowtownella trentonensis Physemataspis pernodosus Sceptaspis lincolnensis Thaleops conradi Thaleops ovata Thaleops laurentiana Gull River (20) Basiliella barrandei Bathyurus acutus Bathyurus extans Bathyurus johnstoni Bathyurus superbus Bathyurus (Raymondites) bandifer Bathyurus (Raymondites) longispinus Bumastoides billingsi Bumastoides milleri Bumastoides porrectus Calyptaulax callicephalus Ceraurus sp. Cybeloides ella Cybeloides plana Failleana indeterminata Isotelus sp. Thaleops angusticollis Thaleops conradi Thaleops latiaxiata Thaleops ovata Oxford (5) Gignopeltis convexus Gignopeltis rarus Goniotelina subrectus Isoteloides canalis Strotactinus salteri SPECIES TOTAL: ~132
  14. With fall just around the corner, I was able to get in a hunting trip with my friend Jeffrey P, to the wilds of upstate NY: Specifically, the Deep Springs Road Site, in Earlville. I met up with Jeff at our usual meet up place, and time, (6:00 am at a park and ride near Jeff - about an hour away from my home.) and loaded his gear into my vehicle. Off we went. We enjoyed some very nice scenery, once the morning fog lifted. Hills, streams, farms, and wildlife. We both saw a bald eagle flying by, and some turkeys, chickens, and a deer or two. After a stop for gas and some food in Roscoe, NY, we headed up to Earlville. It was, as usual, a good ride, punctuated with some great conversation, and some interesting music. We arrived at the site around 9:50 AM. The place looked like it had be worked quite a bit, with large areas of rubble from other people's digging. The weather cooperated nicely, - it was beautiful, with temps in the low 70's, and we enjoyed sun and some cool breezes. We got to work quickly, and finds came in drips and drabs. We both made some decent finds, (pics to follow.) Jeff getting ready to start the day. We hunted until about 5 pm. With a 4.5 hour drive ahead, (for me) we got on the road. A brief stop at everyone's favorite Scottish Restaurant, and a quick stop for gas, we finished the day out with more good conversation and music. Traffic was great until after I dropped Jeff off. I spent about 25 minutes in stop and go traffic on I-84 through Southbury. I got home at around 9:45 PM. Jeff is such a great guy to hunt with. Informative, supportive, knowledgeable, and often quite funny. I always enjoy hunting trips with him. Thanks again for another great trip, Jeff. Please feel free to add your finds here, Jeff. Hope you enjoyed the report and finds. Until next time, Kind regards,
  15. Local trip

    This morning I made a trip to a local spot. Wenlockian. Gravicalymene celebra, measures 4cm This one was difficult to work with, as dolostone always is. Ommokris obex cephalon, which turned out to be partial, and a small ventral calymene. The arrow points to the tongue-like protuberance which I was able to extract in one piece and glue back on, giving this trilobite a gargoylesque appearance. And last but not least, a mystery find...
  16. I've been tardy on making a report on a three-day dig at Penn Dixie with @Malcolmt. We had a real hoot. It all began when Malcolm picked me up from the train station and we sailed through the border as we were lucky to have a Homeland Sec official who recognized Malcolm from the May Dig with the Experts. A border guard who collects fossils? Awesome! We definitely put in our efforts. We joined up with @JamesAndTheFossilPeach and @DevonianDigger to start slabbing out rocks. I can say that our area was not the best as the matrix was brutally hard and not yet subjected to any weathering, which meant slabs would shatter more than split. That aside, it is amazing they still let us crazy canucks in as we carted out about two buckets each of trilobites. Malcolm found a lovely Bellacartwrightia, and I found a double Greenops. We loaded up on the usual complete Eldredgeops rana, prone, enrolled, and semi-prone.
  17. Hi gang, I'm working fervently to prepare a post about the astounding time I had at Fossil Mountain in Utah during my fossil run back in July. (Will take me months to process and identify all these samples from four states.) I found a few partial trilobites at the upper layer of the Lehman formation, but I'm having difficulty identifying them. I freely admit I'm exceedingly weak at trilobites ID. these aren't the best pictures or even the best specimens, but I was there solo and the scree around the cliffs was pretty unstable so I erred in the side of caution. Anyway, Any suggestions much appreciated. I'll post better pictures tomorrow when I get my camera back off of my microscope at work.
  18. Hey everyone! It’s been a crazy busy June, July and beginning of August for me! I just finished moving into my house and I just got married on August 9th so my life has been a tornado. As a result I haven’t been able to comment, participate and keep up with all you fine folks on the forum like I usually do. I was still able to get out collecting here and there and I met up with fellow forum member @DrDave and did some exploring for the lower Devonian eurypterid Erieopterus. I won’t report on that until I have something to share. I think me and Dave found the right horizon now I just gotta search till I find something. Anyway I’m just gonna share the highlights from 3 trips to Briggs rd and 3 trips to DSR and a bonus day at Penn Dixie. Ill do the highlights from Trips on 6/30 7/06 and 7/28 to Briggs rd first. I found some pretty important specimens. Briggs rd is a very interesting site and you can find 3 different species of trilobites here. The Eldredgeops is the most common by far but the greenops and dipleura have made some appearances. This has got to be my most impressive greenops in a long time. This is actually a complete specimen!! The pygidium is tucked underneath. I have the right eye safe in a small ziplock bag. It came off in the counterpart and I saved it to try and glue back when I get the nerve. here’s a picture of the back. I have the counterpart for the pygidium and I’ll need to glue and prep if I want it perfect. Some of the material is attached to the counterpart. Im really excited about this specimen because the quality is good enough to compare with the greenops from DSR and Buffalo area. These eastern New York greenops are considered an undescribed species so I’m glad I have something quality I can use to really eye out the differences. After @Darktooth and his rock club went to Briggs I happened to be there the next day and found this awesome half specimen of a large dipleura! When I got there I found the body segments in 2 pieces and they looked like they went together. After awhile I came across the counterpart in rubble and realized “where is the cephalon?!” I went nuts looking for it with no luck then decided to try and pry a pieces of the wall off and BOOM! The cephalon was still in the outcrop lol. Super lucky. This was my best dipleura from Briggs so far. I’ve found some nice partials but this is the best I’ve found so far. @DrDave was kind enough to gift me this perfect un weathered cephalon. This specimen came from very fresh rock and is nearly perfect. I told Dave I’ve been trying to collect some quality cephalons from Briggs for comparison. I’ve noticed most specimens are usually missing a well preserved exoskeleton. This makes it hard to really compare with the western New York Eldredgeops that grow much much smaller. It’s interesting to me that the greenops are considered a different species and the Eldredgeops are not as you go east across New York State. I’m not here claiming everything is a new species only pointing out the discrepancies in species distribution across the state. Somehow the greenops change species as you go east while the Eldredgeops rana stays the same across the state. It’s not like the Eldredgeops from the east and west are identical either. The eastern New York Eldredgeops can grow to 3 inches! Just food for thought. I think about weird stuff like this a lot ha. anyway...here’s a close up of the undamaged cephalon. A tiny amount of with with an air abrasive and the eye detail will be perfect. here’s and example of a typical Briggs rd cephalon. The eye lenses are very 3D and preserve well even when the exoskeleton is weathered away. It’s hard getting a fresh specimen. just a couple nice cephalopods courtesy of Briggs rd. I love trilobites but I appreciate a quality cephalopod should a complete on present itself lol. Next is DSR highlights! Phyllocarids on the menu
  19. Hi all, My girlfriend and I are planning a trip to New York State sometime in September, and although her main motive might be shopping, mine is - you guessed it - fossils! Does anyone know of a place on could find Olenellus or Elliptocephala in New York? I know they can be found around Albany, but I can't find any obvious outcrops... Aside from where to find Lower Cambrian trilobites, any other suggestions regarding great fossil outcrops in eastern New York are much appreciated! Cheers, Marc
  20. 9th trip to Chatsworth: A last hurrah

    As my life in college is imminent (I head to Milledgeville Thursday), I wanted to fit in one last pre-college trip to my favorite bug spot (An idea that was really given life when I heard about a Schwimmer paper that got into PALAIOS about what may be the oldest nesting behavior ever discovered (https://www.georgiasfossils.com/new-2b-a-trilobite-nest-in-georgia.html)). I can say with confidence that yesterday scored in the upper tier of my trip list to the site. I arrived later in the day than I usually would (got there around 6:00 or something), and the river was once again quite low. As a matter of fact, I think it was as low today as I've ever seen it: I went to work right away splitting some slabs from one of the lower layers that seems to give me the best results, and before long, I was getting quality split after quality split. By the end of my relatively brief 1 hour stay, I had quite a few nice pieces to take with me: Cont.
  21. I’m wondering if anyone has collected at the Spence Gulch site outside Liberty, Idaho, in the last year or so and would be kind enough to give me a status report. I have a chance to go before long, but random internet opinion seems pretty evenly divided between “great place, lots of fossils” and “bad quality rock, lots of work for little reward.” I’d be grateful for any help/info. Wendell
  22. Hello all, I am curious to know about the techniques people use for producing photographs for plates in paleontological publications. I know there are some professional paleontologists on here, so I'm assuming some of you have personal experience in this area. What equipment in general is ideal for this? I have next to no experience with photography outside of taking pictures of my personal collection with a point and shoot. The reason why I am asking is because I will be required to do so for my undergraduate thesis research (photoshoot of some Lower Cambrian trilobites) and I am having trouble finding good resources for this on the internet. Paleontology/biostratigraphy projects aren't all that common at my school, so I don't have very many people that I know personally to ask for advice. I've taken photos of my specimens so that I have stuff to look at in the field using one of the cameras from my supervisor's lab (the make escapes me, I can post it when I'm back on campus tomorrow). These photos were acceptable for my purposes (eye candy and IDing things with some references I brought) but are not up to snuff for publications. Just curious to see what people's experience is with this and whether or not there are any publications on the protocols that are used for doing this sort of stuff. Any and all suggestions are welcome! Thanks!
  23. Morrocco Trilobite Identification

    I bought this morrocco Trilobite from an antique shop recently, and I have had a tough time identifying it. I believe the cephalon might be broken, so that complicates matters. Any help would be appreciated.
  24. I have just returned from my first visit to a new fossil locality in the Northern Territory, central Australia. The location is around 400km north-east of Alice Springs along some rough dirt roads and once reached, runs for about 10km along the side of the road. When visiting the location today one finds themselves in the very center of Australia and a landscape of flat desert and scrub land, about as far from the sea as possible. In the middle Cambrian the site was very different and home to a vast shallow sea filled with ancient life. Arriving in the late afternoon we set up camp and got prepared for the morning of fossil hunting ahead. I had read about the fossil location from a small local out of print fossicking guide from the 1980's. That lead me to read some of the work done by John R. Laurie who has some papers published online detailing the formation and it's biostratigraphy. We managed to find some good examples of Xystridurid trilobites and stromatolites, all found within a red/white siltstone. There were also a smaller species of Agnostid trilobite, but we found many less of these. Below are some quick images I took of some of the finds, many more yet to properly examine. Also we have some larger slabs of siltstone which we plan to work on. Trip Image Album: The fossil site is found in the location below https://www.google.com/maps/place/21%C2%B042'53.0%22S+135%C2%B039'38.9%22E/@-21.71473,135.66081,1873m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x0:0x0!8m2!3d-21.71473!4d135.66081 In the publication below, NTGS Elk 3 bore samples refer to the location visited. Great trip! Very pleased with the finds and learning more about the geological history of central Australia.
  25. Millard County Hunt

    I’m going to U-Dig, the surrounding area and Cowboy pass in Utah Late September. Let me know if you’d like to go. This is some of what I’ve found there but I have found so much more.
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