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Found 538 results

  1. Hey everyone, At first: my apologies that this is the only picture I have. I am looking into buying this lot of minerals and fossils which include the fossils on the attached picture. The scorpions and the centipede however do look very fake to me. Can anyone confirm these to be fake? And what about the trilobites? Thank you all for your time and help.
  2. Helderberg Group Fossils

    A few years ago I collected with the NYPS at a quarry exposing some Helderberg Group limestone. I failed to label some of my finds. I have a best guess on the trilobites but I was hoping to get some confirmation. I have struggled identifying a few of the brachiopods and a bryozoan and I could use some help with those. Any help is greatly appreciated. #1 - some type of bryozoan but I am not sure which one #2- ??? #3- ??? #4- Paciphacops logani? #5- Odontocephalus sp.? #6- Dalmanites pleuroptyx?
  3. I was taken to a yard sale by my Wife, and got these as a suprise. I was blown away, then I noticed they look to be from Morocco, and someone also commented the same thing. I know Morocco has many fakes, so I was looking to see what everyone here thought.
  4. Headless greenops from DSR

    From the album Middle Devonian in Central New York

    Greenops barberi Windom Shale Moscow Formation Hamilton Group Middle Devonian Deep Springs Road Lebanon, New York Collected 7/18/20
  5. Devonian Double Whammy

    I had a great time meeting up at DSR with @mattbsharks today. We shared the site with a family from Sayre, Pennsylvania, and the New York Paleontology Society also paid us a visit. I found some decent stuff but gave away some items to a gentleman from Texas, as it was his first fossilhunt. So I sent him home with some trilobite bits and pieces. We also went over to Briggs Road for a bit. I only stayed for a little while as the sun was getting to hot for my liking. Also got to meet forum member @Nautiloid and his Dad at DSR. When Matt and I got to Briggs we ran into @DrDave. So it was great to meet new friends as well as seeing old friends. Here is a pic of me when I first got there.
  6. Hi everyone! Hoping you can help me with a mystery. We've lived in our house for 5 years now, but with nothing else to do considering this pandemic, we've been exploring our front stone path a LOT more closely than we did before (especially considering 5 year old daughter's interest in fossils). We have noticed three trilobites (don't know how I missed these in the past - they are clear as daylight) and a couple other interesting things (maybe bryozoans, coral or echinoderms - I admit i can't tell them apart well). All of these new discoveries have me REALLY wondering now about something big that i have been wondering about for 5 years - the very last picture. I previously thought it was man-made - maybe result of some rebar or something, but now with these other discoveries, i'm really wondering. Anyone have any ideas for us? Thank you! We live in Northwest Indiana. That may or may not say anything at all about where the stone was sourced. I suspect it's limestone? But I really don't know for sure. We do have a giant quarry nearby (Thornton Quarry - fossil-rich limestone and on my bucket list to get a tour there one day). But really, this stone could be from anywhere. Lastly, each of these fossils (or mineralizations, or whatever they are) is in a different piece of stone. Anyway - here are the pictures - seven "fossils" and one of the path so you can see what we're dealing with. Thank you again!
  7. What Calymene Species Are These?

    Hello again everyone. These are two of my favorite fossils, both Calymene spp. The first one was owned by my teacher for his biology classroom until he agreed to sell it to me because I had grown to love it. Unfortunately, as you can see, its cephalon is very damaged so that makes it more difficult to tell what it is. I know that it's definitely a Calymene, but I'm wondering which species, if possible to tell. In my own personal research, I found that I believed he most closely resembled a Calymene tristani? but I am very much an amateur and am not sure on that. If anyone could give me some more input despite his relatively poor condition, I'd appreciate it. This second one I purchased online, and was sold as a Calymene sp. from Morocco. It is quite a bit smaller than the first one and its body appears more compressed, for lack of a better word?, which leads me to believe it's a different species. It is also significantly better preserved. Is this Moroccan species simply unnamed, or is there a more specific name out there that I'm unable to find? Thanks in advance, everyone :-)
  8. It's been a long while since I've posted on here. I haven't been able to collect much lately, but I recently went out to some new haunts and came back with some pretty intriguing stuff I'll hopefully get to follow up on later. I'll start off with an interesting discovery I've had recently. The outcrop exposes rocks stretching from the upper(?) Brallier Formation to the middle(?) Foreknobs Formation. Although I tried searching in the past for brittle star trace fossils, I was mostly unsuccessful in this regard, and over time my interest in it shifted to the much more fossiliferous beds of the Foreknobs (formerly Chemung) Formation. A couple of years ago I posted about finding a fish bone in a boulder next to the outcrop, as well as pointing out I found some potential teeth. Going over my posts, that finding intrigued me so I dug deeper into the presence (or lack thereof) of fish remains in the upper Devonian strata of the region. What I came up with was an 1887 report of the Genesee Shale from New York, an upper Devonian formation roughly analogous to the Scherr (and possibly the lower Foreknobs by the sound of it, it's all rather ambiguous) in Maryland. The authors noted multiple occurrences of fish bones and isolated teeth in sandstone and "fine pebble conglomerate"...similar in description to the rocks of my own outcrop. Coupled with the knowledge of possible fish remains I found previously I decided it'd be worth it to give the outcrop a more thorough look over, this time concentrating instead on the conglomerate facies and ignoring the shale. What I discovered has so far been fairly interesting. As I stated previously the outcrop exposes parts of the Brallier and Foreknobs Formations, including several dozen feet of shale and siltstone in the Foreknobs grading into upper siltstone and sandstone beds closer to the axis of the syncline. Towards the top of the exposed section of the Foreknobs is a bed several inches thick of hard, pebbly conglomerate. After some searching the silty shale above and below the bed is mostly unfossiliferous, although local profusions in brachiopods, crinoids, and other creatures are present. The conglomerate, however, is densely fossiliferous to the point that it forms a veritable coquina in parts running for several feet along the exposure. Because the conglomerate is so hard (made up of quartzose pebbles and sand), and the underlying and overlying beds made of much softer shale and silty rock, the conglomerate is poorly exposed outside of the exposure wall, forming something of a canopy between it and the less resistant layers. It is covered in part by a dense layer of talus from the overlying beds, likewise obscuring part of the exposure. Luckily, however, a few boulders have eroded out from the cut and are free on the ground to examine, and a few loose pieces weathered from the boulders are present around those. In these rocks I have found one chunk of blueish-white fish bone(?), and several possible tooth fragments. I recently examined the outcrop wall looking for more bone/teeth still present in the outcrop, and discovered part of a fish tooth(?) exposed slightly above one of the boulders, and similar looking black enamel(?) specks that could be fish derivatives. They are distinguished from the quartz pebbles by their shiny black appearance, whereas the quartz is mostly lighter gray and translucent. Is this a possible bone bed in the Foreknobs Formation? More scouting is of course needed, but there's a strong possibility in my opinion that, at the minimum, this conglomerate layer is a decent source of fragmentary Devonian fish remains. Note the blueish tint to the fossil. This possible bone fragment was found in a boulder of quartzose, pebbly conglomerate in the middle-upper Foreknobs Formation (Famennian). Note the associated fauna of crinoid and brachiopod fragments. Crinoid stem fragments in particular are extremely common, comprising a large part of the conglomerate "pebbles." This boulder is derived from a layer above a Cyrtospirifer disjunctus bearing shale, indicating it's Chemung age.
  9. Fossil Locations

    I'm looking for some fossil sites that are about an hour to two hours around Blanchard. I'll collect just about anything and really just want to find some spots. I also am a little confused on laws regarding fossil collecting in Oklahoma, so if any one has any info on that I would love to hear.
  10. Has Anyone Found the Cambrian

    Hello Everyone, As someone who grew up in Washington and goes back on occasion when university is out (still haven’t found a crab yet though, they’re elusive) I have a passionate interest in the fossils of my state. I have recently been going through the fossilspot.com list of find spots for Washington and noticed, much to my excitement, that there are some listings for the Cambrian. I didn’t realise we had any Cambrian, I thought it was all a little North and East of Washington. Has anyone ever gone out and tried to find these? I’d be really interested to see if these reports are valid since they are relatively patchy. I’ve tried to find where they are talking about on Google earth with a geologic map overlay. Benton
  11. From the album Ordovician

    Flexicalymene senaria Calymendid trilobites Middle Ordovician Denley Formation Poland Member Trenton Group Little Falls, N.Y. prepared by Ptychodus04. Thanks Kris ID help- piranha. Thanks Scott
  12. From the album Lower Devonian

    Kettneraspis tuberculata Odontopleurid Trilobite Lower Devonian Kalkberg Formation Helderberg Group Schoharie Co., New York Prepared by Ptychodus04 ID Help- Piranha
  13. It was an all day outing on a perfect spring day in Central Upstate New York. Al Tahan and I visited a small private quarry where the Middle Devonian Oatkacreek Formation Mottville Member, part of the Marcellus Shale and the lower Hamilton Group is exposed. It's been about a year since I visited the site which I've been coming to for the past five years and it was Al's first visit. Erosion had broken down almost all of the pieces of shale which covered much of the site on previous visits. However a lot of fossils here, preserved in calcite are weathered free from the matrix and surface collecting can be very productive. This is by far the best site I've been to for the gastropod, Bembexia sulcomarginata. There were dozens strewn about the site. I couldn't resist picking up a few adding to my already extensive Bembexia collection. Brachiopods were also plentiful, especially the large spiriferid, Spinocyrtia granulosa (upper right). I couldn't help adding this inflated example to my large collection. Upper left is Mucrospirifer murcronatus, certainly one of the most abundant and distinctive Middle Devonian brachiopods in New York. Lower left is Protoleptostrophia perplana, a Strophomenid.
  14. Whittington, H.B. and Evitt, W.R., 1953. Silicified Middle Ordovician trilobites (Vol. 59). Geological Society of America. https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/books/book/65/Silicified-Middle-Ordovician-Trilobites (free download until June 30, 2020) Whittington, H.B., 1959, Silicified Middle Ordovician trilobites: Remopleurididae, Trinucleidae, Raphiophoridae, Endymioniidae. Bulletin of the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard College. vol. 121, pp. 369-496. https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/part/32962#/summary https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/page/4778534#page/501/mode/1up Hu, C.H., 1974, September. 635. Ontogenies of two Middle Ordovician trilobites from the Edinburg Formation, Virginia. In Transactions and proceedings of the Paleontological Society of Japan. New series (Vol. 1974, No. 95, pp. 353-363). Palaeontological Society of Japan. https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/prpsj1951/1974/95/1974_95_353/_article/-char/ja Hu, C.H., 1976, April. 657. Ontogenies of three species of Silicified Middle Ordovician trilobites from Virginia. In Transactions and proceedings of the Paleontological Society of Japan. New series (Vol. 1976, No. 101, pp. 247-263). Palaeontological Society of Japan. https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/prpsj1951/1976/101/1976_101_247/_pdf/-char/ja https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/prpsj1951/1976/101/1976_101_247/_article/-char/ja/ Bruton, D.L. and Nakrem, H.A., 2005. Enrollment in a Middle Ordovician agnostoid trilobite. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 50(3). http://agro.icm.edu.pl/agro/element/bwmeta1.element.agro-article-e5a5ef53-3af9-4efd-b8b3-ca3006e0e32d/c/app50-441.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  15. Is this part of a trilobite?

    Hi guys, I am not very good at identifying fossils yet. Its my main goal to find trilobite fossils because I think theyre really neat and I am wondering if these are possibly sections of a trilobite. I dont think there is a lot to go on but I was extremely impressed by the speed and ease that was required to identify my last find (thank you very much Kane!). There are two fossils, one is orange-y and the other is a darker grey and harder to see.
  16. New York fossil trip by mail

    A while back, @Darktooth and I did a little trading. Somewhere in the mix, he mentioned that his educational outreach (and collection) would benefit from some examples of C. chubutensis. I sent a couple of examples and it seems all that cuspy goodness went to his head. I received a COVID care package from Dave a week or so ago that contained a complete New York fossil trip in a box! I was completely blown away and the objects have given me quite a bit of entertainment. The field-trip-in-a-box was complete with lovely hand written tags, so everything was ready to put right into a large riker box. No way Dave could have known this, but my family has been self-quarantined because my son had a known COVID exposure. This care package has been a welcome distraction, to say the least! My absolute favorite is the Grammysioidea. I'd seen these in past posts and online. They are just as cool in person as in pictures. Thanks for the awesome collection and distraction Dave! Case with fossils and labels Bembexia sulcomarginate Dipleura dekayi Grammysioidea alveata Greenops sp Greenops sp Greenops sp Rhipidomella sp
  17. Hello, I’m a beginner of collecting trilobites fossils, and I have bought one recently but seems it’s a fake trilobites. Can you guys help me plz. Thanks!
  18. A few weeks ago I went on a fossil hunting trip to Albany County. I was hunting in the New Scotland formation which is lower Devonian in age. It was very quick and easy to collect in and the dry dredging technique was quite useful. The rock was a very thin shaly limestone which could break easily but many of the fossils had been silicified, making it easy to pop them out of the rock. I found many different species of brachiopods, some gastropods, lots of corals and large bryozoa and a few trilobites
  19. Today on a hunt I found on of the most unusual trilobite pygidiums I've ever seen from new york and cannot find anything out there to compare it to. Unfortunately the site is imported material from an unknown quarry upstate so all I do know is that its from the Devonian of New York based on other material found there, unfortunately I cannot attach a formation to this one. Also its also fragile and a very partial piece thats unpreped, I think its a ventral display. This maybe a head scratcher so maybe the trilobite experts here can help weigh in on what this can possibly be.
  20. Hey everyone!! I'm writing in to see if anybody has a preference between Paulding fossil garden and Sylvania fossil park for finding trilobites. There is a spot at the header of this entry which nobody else has talked about that might yield some gems. Posts about Paulding seem like hit or miss trilobite presence. Which site would be more "picked over" do you think, if you do at all? I'm driving through Ohio soon and can only stop at one spot. Trilobites and microfossils are my priority and all else would be a great bonus. If anyone cares to weigh in I would greatly appreciate it - I don't know where to start! Thanks, Justin
  21. Sunday was the warmest and most pleasant day so far this spring. I decided on a solo venture up north to Schoharie County, N.Y. My destination was two road cut sites which expose the Lower Devonian Kalkberg Formation, part of the Helderberg group. The primary attractions here are the abundance and diversity of fossils, and very good preservation. The first road cut site is immense and I spent about three hours surface collecting. Most of my finds were brachiopods, some very nice specimens of Leptanena rhomboidalis, Discomyorthis oblata, Meristella, sp., Costistroponella sp., and a variety of Rhynchonellids. Also found a gastropods internal mold, an Enterolasma strictum, a rogose coral, and a 8 by 7 inch Favosites helderbergiae, a tabulate coral colony.
  22. Trilobites from Sweden

    Wins from an auction hosted by my friend @Kasia These bits are in a medium grey limestone found at Raback, near Kinnekulle, Vastegotland, Sweden, so are probably from the Upper Cambrian part of the Alum Shale Formation. Maybe Peltura scaraboides? Or is there not enough left to get close to an id? Max 5 mm wide and 4 mm long. All specimens are on the same rock. The scale's in mm and is partially obscuring a bit seen better below : Not really expecting too much from these tiny fragments, but any help or blind guesswork very much appreciated. @piranha @Johannes @Dromiopsis But anyone else more than welcome to comment too Thank you.
  23. Triarthrus day !

    First sunny day of the week . Wife and kids getting slowly crazy while I have to deal with a higher than average workload from home. Hum ...time to steal a few hours with the two oldest ones and get back to the Nicollet Fm (ordovician ) nearby. This time Flexys did not make the cut , or none did with all parts intact ( except maybe one found by my eldest) . This Triarthrus Rougensis made my day though , the best (by far ) I found so far . Followed by another promising one later .2 and a half hours well spent! PS: wow , just noticed this is my first post since landing here ! Time flies faster and faster ..
  24. Three Unlabeled Trilobites to ID

    Being stuck at home has given me the opportunity to rummage through my fossils. I started with my trilobites. Weeded out three containers of Isotelus partials to give to the local sand pit. But I found 3 unidentified trilobites tucked in with the Isotelus for some reason.. Any help at IDs is appreciated. 1. Gerastos?? I think this was a gift to me many years ago. 2. Thaleops? Though I considered Illaenus or even Bumastus. The matrix looks like the Platteville, Ordovician 3. I have such difficulty with "rollers"! Thaleops? Matrix looks like the Galena, Ordovician that I frequent.
  25. Are these the same?

    Are these two odontopleurid pygidiums from the same species? They don't seem to match up. Same locality, Maquoketa group.First one measures 4mm across and the second measures 2mm. I'm finding not much information on odontopleurids from the Maquoketa... Leonaspis? Any help appreciated.
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