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Found 312 results

  1. Possible Egg

    Found in a wash of an Upper Cretaceous formation in the Four Corners area of the United States. I guess it is some sort of fossilized egg but would like a second opinion. In the formation, fossils from former terrestrial, aquatic and arboreal life is routinely found. The specimen is 6.3 cm long, and due to some compression at the time of fossilization is sort of shaped like a Brazil nut around its middle.
  2. Turtle?

    Hello Here I have two bones. I think one is an ulna? Maybe turle, but I don't have any experience with turtles. It looks like a juvenil bone, I have the feeling that there should be joints but they are not there (not fused?). The second one I also have no exprience with. The cortical layer is so ridiculusly thin... It is so light and hollow, I don't know with what to compair it. Ulna? measurements: 131x32x18mm Hollow bone measurements: 97x30x20mm Thank you for any information
  3. Turtle or?

    Heyy , I have these two bones from which I do not recognize the bone structure. Normally fish is layered, turtle to? The big one could me crocodile? I am lost on these bones. I thought the long one could be a piece of rib. But please help me! lxbxh Measurements rib?: 140x43x22mm Measurements ID?: 95x75x53mm Merci
  4. Richmond ,NW Queensland ,2020

    Hello All this is a wrap up of our finds from our Richmond trips 2020 This post is about two trips combined where I visited the same location which is Richmond , NW Queensland Australia. The dig site is a public dig area which contains Cretaceous marine material from the Toolebuc formation. This site is well known for its abundant fish, shark ,marine reptile bones and rare bird/ pterosaur fossils. Growing up in the North Island of New Zealand and I have been collecting fossils since I was a kid however fossils from vertebrate animals are exceedingly rare in that area (Except Shark teeth) therefore my knowledge of vertebrate fossils is very poor. So, going out to Richmond which has abundant vertebrate fossils is a dream come true I have learnt so much over the last 3 years heading out there. The first trip was in July which I did with my partner and kids and the 2nd trip was in October which I did solo due to the extreme weather at the time. Due to the weather which was 42C and threat of severe storms I located the area I wanted to dig and did most my work at night with lamps, there were also less flies at night which made it more pleasant. During the two trips we found several turtle bones which was exciting and unexpected, it wasn’t the kind of marine reptile bones we had in mind. We found a small ichthyosaur tooth and a neural arch. There are layers of material known as fish mash which contain large amounts of small fish bones. Amongst this we found a few larger fish bones and a fish tail. My partner also found the largest and first sharks’ tooth of our trip she was very happy about this. We collected some of this material which we took home and broke up and sieved for shark teeth and any other rare or unusually specimens. Working alongside my 11 year old son we broke up and processed the fish mash material where we found a few smaller turtle bones and sharks teeth our best finds were 3 johnlongia teeth these are usually rare so we were good finds, the third tooth which he found he was able to ID the tooth which was great to see how much he has learnt. Also goes to show how much better his eyes are than mine as I missed it. Lastly, I would like to thank everyone on the forum who has given me advice and helped me ID fossils especially Mike D’Arcy without your help we would of never made these finds thanks a lot mate. Cannot wait to get back out there. Finding the dig site before dark, yes the silly looking mask is required to keep the flies out. The dig site at night. My wifes tooth. I will put more pictures in comments
  5. Looking for Goulmima Turtle fossils, have some other moroccan fossils for trade
  6. Cretaceous scute to identify

    Help needed ! I prepped part of this bone with the highest difficulties because of a thin crust of iron sticking to the fossil. It comes from continental cretaceous of South of France. Before going further I would like to identify it to assess if it is worth the trouble . I hesitate between a Nodosauridae scute and simply a... turtle scute. I took pictures of the top (under the thin remaining matrix it is all bone), sides and bottom (which is totally unprepped and may never be, just note it is flat)
  7. Please help ID

    I found this item today at the beach (Edisto Island SC). I have no ruler handy for size. We are camping at the moment.
  8. Texas Cave Find Claw

    Hello everyone, hope someone can help ID this claw for me to at least genus. This came from Burnet County, TX cave on the river. It is well fossilized and solid, from an older layer in the cave where I have found two turtle species - Apalone and an unidentified leg hole fragment of turtle/tortoise the material is Late Pleistocene. I am figuring this claw probably belongs to my unidentified turtle shell piece but the shell fragment is pretty beat up.
  9. Claw Core and Hoof Core?

    Happy Thanksgiving to everyone! I really appreciate this forum and the people willing to take the time and effort to answer everyone's questions and help people learn. I found these two fragments on the Brazos River in sandy gravel and low water near Brookshire, Texas. Mostly Pleistocene era here with some Cretaceous shells also I think. FRAGMENT ONE: CLAW CORE? The photos I'd seen of claw cores made me think this could be one, but since it's not very well defined, I've been wondering if it's even animal related at all. The most similar example I could find was a turtle claw core documented by @Harry Pristis , as seen here: Am I way off base? The flat smooth side and holes made me think it was vascular tissue, but I've wondered if it might be reef or even some type of mineral instead. FRAGMENT TWO: SMALL HOOF CORE? This looks like a very small hoof fragment with a rounded top and very flat bottom. The exterior looks worn on the toe-tip area and broken off toward the top. I had trouble finding anything that looked similar online. It does seem very small compared to several other hoof core examples I've seen. The closest thing I could find that looked a little similar was this camel hoof core fragment documented by @worthy 55 As usual, any help would be appreciated, and thanks to anyone who takes a look. --Brandy
  10. Brazos River Vertebra ID?

    Location: Brazos Riverbed, near Brookshire, Texas Estimated Age: Pleistocene Matrix: Sand, low water, gravel I found this vertebra in the riverbed yesterday and could use help identifying it, if possible. I found this link, which made me think it was possibly a turtle vertebra, since it looks like the front is convex and the back is concave. It's a pretty large vertebra, so my turtle guess may be completely off, unless this is another hesperotestudo piece. Thanks for any help or suggestions! --Brandy
  11. Costal vs. Scute vs. Osteoderm IDs

    Location: Brazos River, near Brookshire, TX Found: Gravel, sand, low water Estimated time: Pleistocene I've been searching through info on scutes, osteoderms, reptile fossils, and types of turtle shell and plastron parts because we seem to have a lot of those in our area, but I'm having a hard time telling the difference. These are my best guesses, and I'm hoping someone can educate me on the differences. FRAG 1--I think this is a large turtle/tortoise scute fragment, but I'm not sure how to tell the difference between neural, costal, central, etc. FRAG 2--I believe this is an osteoderm (because it looks like skin instead of part of a shell?), but I'm not sure the type. Maybe alligator? FRAG 3--My husband thought this may just be a rock, but I thought it looked like a fossilized shell plate of a turtle. It's relatively thin. We see a lot of these on the river. FRAG 4--This looked like another osteoderm to me because it has a similar texture on top to Frag2. But it's much thinner and the edges are more defined. Any info would be a big help! Thank you. --Brandy
  12. Brazos River--Large Turtle Piece?

    I found this partially covered in sand and very shallow water at the edge of a sandbar in the Brazos River near Brookshire, Texas. I cleaned it up with vinegar and a toothbrush when I got home. The fossils in the river near me are supposed to mostly be Pleistocene, but I've also heard that there may be some Cretaceous period marine fossils. I tagged this as a possible turtle piece because that's what it resembled to me, but I couldn't really find anything like it when I searched the internet and this site. I have more pictures, including pictures from before I cleaned it, if those would be helpful. It weighs about a pound. Any information would be great. Thank you! --Brandy
  13. Is this real? I don't have any info about this fossil. I paid half
  14. Here is a brief report from one of our latest forays into Calvert County, MD. The well-known stretch of shoreline along the western Chesapeake Bay is loaded with Miocene fossils, with the Calvert, St. Mary's, and Choptank formations progressively exposed along a ~24 mile stretch of beach and cliffs. We found an Airbnb in Lusby, MD which was not too far from Matoaka Lodges, which seemed the best bet since the nearly 2 mile walk to the beaches at Calvert Cliffs State Park is impractical for our family at this time. Covid-19 and Maryland's onerous private land regulations can make it tough if not impossible to access some of the other municipal beaches along the coast. For example, Brownies Beach, Dares Beach, Cove Point, and Flag Pond are all restricted in some way to town or county residents only. Matoaka Lodges however will grant day-pass access for a small fee, and the beach is from my experience very diverse and productive in its fossils. We spent a total of 5 hours there, employing an 1/8" sieve and also simply walking the surf line. The largest tooth pictured here actually washed up at my feet as I was surreptitiously bending over at the same time. Most of the rest were found with the sieve. Most of these are shark or sting ray teeth and a few turtle shells plus some of the smaller items I could not identify. A local told me that porpoise teeth can be found there also. This lot comprises the smallest fossils found; in addition to these (mostly) teeth and shell fragments were found a large and diverse sample of vertebrate fragments, corals, miscellaneous other fossils (snails, mollusks, etc.) which I will post in the follow-up report to this one. Having spent some time at some of the other sites along Calvert Cliffs this summer, I would say based on the diversity, number of fossils, and time spent collecting, that Matoaka is definitely worth the return trip.
  15. Large NJ Cretaceous Bone

    Found this thick bone piece in a new jersey cretaceous creek and wonder if its possible to maybe id since one side has a distinct rough texture while the other is flatter and striated, I would guess either large turtle, mosasaur, or dinosaur. My friend joked its a theropod maxilary skull fragment, but we all know around here that material seems close to impossible to come across haha. Interested to hear any other thoughts.
  16. A few bits from South Dakota

    Here are a few bits from a trip to the Orella member a while back. Now part of the collection at my Uni. I suspect Stylemys nebrascensis oreodont-left dentition p4-m2
  17. Scute? Texas

    From North of San Antonio in Cretaceous Zone. Could be a leverite but this one looked a bit weird. Pretty small.
  18. Petrified find

    Hello and good evening everyone. I have a rather large curiosity. length is 25” X 14 1/2” X 6” estimated weight is 125 too 150 lbs found in Rogers Arkansas around Beaver Lake in or around 2012. I purchased this as a conversation piece to go in my waterfall that I am putting in my back yard and was very intrigued by it when I purchased it from an old friend. I’ve been told it is a dinosaur egg also have been told it is a Turtle? If it is a Turtle I cannot find where any of the openings would have been, head, legs or tail opening or a seam where it would have closed up? Hope you enjoy this, it’s very intriguing.
  19. Toe/Finger bone?

    I found this half of a phalanx bone in the upper Dinosaur Park Formation. I’m wondering whether it belongs to a turtle or a small theropod. Would any of you guys know what it is? Thanks!
  20. I saw this while I was searching for Crato Formation fish for sale and I found this turtle that sold quite awhile ago online. On closer inspection it looks carved and painted on, but I wanted to see what everyone else thought!
  21. Good morning, please take a look at this artifact I discovered a few weeks ago and help me identify if this is something other than a rock with unique features and patterns. I have spent FAR too much time closely inspecting it and I'm convienced that it is something other than a naturally forming rock. Altough I'm not an expert in geology, I have collected thousands upon thousands of artifacts which is one of the reasons this one clearly stood out to me. The color, shape, pattern, and texture is very distinct. Please note that this artifact is not whole and has been broken in half. The photos are top down. What I see is a fossilized creature curled up in what could be an egg or borrow. It looks to be reptillian based off the patten of what could be the underbelly on one side of the fossil and the shape of the what I believe woud be the snout of the head (again it has been partially broken off). Also, there seems to be a long tail that wraps around the circumfrence of the unit and centered in the middle is the snout/head. When carefully observing the interior of where the break occurred, there apprears to be the spinal column (color differentation) originating from the head that may have lead to the torso as well as part of the torso. Lastly, there appears to be some digits to a claw (encircled). If anybody want to contact me for additional details, please don't hesitate.
  22. Fossil ID? Found in central NJ

    Hello all, I've been lurking here for about a month. I found something I can't identify for sure... I was told it looks like a fossilized turtle shell? I was wondering if anyone could provide me with any specifics.. thank you
  23. ID Fossil Turtle Shell ?

    Found this cool fossil today. Measures 6 1/2" x 5 1/2" x 2 inches high. Venice, FL construction site. Located 5 feet away from a nice Meg tooth. Pleistocene material recovered within 50 yards. My first thought was small tortoise shell fully intact. Located close by was another larger size tortoise shell that was not fully fossilized. Hoping someone can confirm this is a fossilized turtle shell. Regards, Michael
  24. Hot Texas Creek Hunt!

    I hunted a remote stretch in Northeast Texas and found a nice variety of items. The vert is from a good size mosasaur. The sawfish teeth always seem to be broken. I found some small shark teeth and a piece of cretaceous turtle shell. The bottles are from the 1930's and 1940's. I really like the Groves Tasteless Chill Tonic bottle. I posted a little info on the old bottles. We saw at least twenty wild hogs in one pack crossing the creek and one giant solo wild boar.
  25. One for the turtle folks

    Just curious what part of the critter this comes from. Not sure who the turtle experts are on here so I thought I would tag and obvious one. @turtlesteve Found in North Central Nebraska
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