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Found 39 results

  1. T-rex Teeth Verification

    For context, I have received these photos from the shop that I have done business with previously. I want to ensure that these are rex teeth and not another genus. I acknowledge that these pictures do not show the base of the teeth which seems to be the tell tale differentiation, in addition to measurements of scale and so on. Therefore, I just would like to see the opinions of those on the forum with the pictures provided, I wish I was able to take more appropriate photos of the specimens. Tooth #1 strikes me as a likely rex candidate simply because of the robustness, #2 I'm not so sure. Not an expert on theropod teeth by any means. Thank you all! (The 98 million year old age is a typo, they have a more expensive tooth with the appropriate age of 68 million years)
  2. Tyrannosaur tooth

    Hello would this be a rex or nano tooth its form hell creek formation ?
  3. T. rex ancestor had an S-shaped brain, fossil reveals

    https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2018/11/tyrannosaurus-rex-ancestor-s-shaped-brain-fossil-skull/
  4. I need help to identify these fossils

    Okay, so I have a couple of fossils in my collection, in which I'd like some more opinions on. First, I bought this un-identified dinosaur chevron bone. It is from the Kem Kem beds, Morocco.
  5. This report is a bit late, but better late than never! During late July through to mid August 2018 i was on a research trip to study a new Canadian dinosaur footprint site for my Masters degree project. I am based in Australia, and this was the first time i had been to Canada! So of course i had to make the most of it and pay a visit to the world renowned Dinosaur Provincial Park in southern Alberta, arguably the richest site in the world for dinosaur fossils. The park is the best exposure of the Dinosaur Park Formation (which it is now named after), which dates to about 76.5 million years ago during the mid-Campanian. I had long read about this location and watched it on documentaries for so many years growing up as a kid. Finally being there in person was very surreal! I was quite lucky and managed to go on a long, extended walk through the park with one of the guides for about 6 hours in total. In this relatively short amount of time i observed so many amazing fossils. I must have been completely desensitised within the first 30 minutes! It really is incredible how much fossil material there is lying all over the park. In Australia, whole scientific papers are written about isolated or fragmentary dinosaur bones, yet here they were just lying everywhere! The pictures really speak for themselves. As said, all of these fossils were observed in the field during a single days visit to the park. As this is a World Heritage site, nothing was taken, all finds were put straight back onto the ground after i took these photos. It's a VERY hard thing to do, but rules are rules. The only thing that was removed from the park on my trip was my best find of the day... a near-perfect 5.3 cm tyrannosaur tooth from Gorgosaurus!!!! This find was too special to leave behind, so the park tour guide GPS marked the location and brought it back for display, likely at the visitor centre or as a demonstration piece for their guided tours. To say that i have found a tyrannosaur tooth is a great honour! You may remember it from the July 2018 VFOTM poll. Without further ado, here are the pics! It is going to take multiple posts to fit them all in, so scroll all the way down to see them all! Various dinosaur vertebrae. Everything from hadrosaurs (duck billed dinosaurs) and ceratopsians (horned dinosaurs) to theropods (two legged meat eaters) and ankylosaurs (armoured dinosaurs). These were so common! I would probably pick a new one up every 5 minutes or so. Ankylosaur tooth
  6. Aguja tyrannosaurid tooth

    From the album Theropod fossils

    Aguja tyrannosaurid aguja formation
  7. Tyrannosaurid tooth

    From the album Theropod fossils

    Tyrannosaurid tooth Judith river formation
  8. Hello whats are the possibility of getting Lythronax, Teratophoneus, Appalachiosaurus and Dryptosaurus tooth fossils ?
  9. Ok, so I know these are kinda small, but hopefully it's good enough to tell. The tyrannosaur fossil was originally compacted, so keep that in mind if there's anything that would be attributed to that. Pic 1:unidentified tyrannosaur 2:stegosaurus 3&4:allosaurus (I know the allo metacarpal may be hard to destinguish, so I'm not expecting anything concrete on that one)
  10. Tyrannosaur ID

    I found this tooth on an auction site. Seller labeled it "Nanosaurus," saying it's a raptor tooth from the hell creek. I'm pretty confident his ID is incorrect, and this is Infact a Nanotyrannus tooth but I'm not sure. Tyrannosaurus is also a possibility. @Troodon any thoughts?
  11. Organizing Collection/ ID Help

    Organizing my collection has been the tedious, but also a really fun process. I’ll probably continually posting here for assistance. When I’m feeling a little more confident about my ID’s, I’ll post it in the members collection section to share. I still have some fossils to prep, piece together, display, label, etc. and really fortunate that I have all of you helping constantly; it really speeds up the process. In another year’s time, I’ll be much more educated/ well rounded Some of my fossils are rookie purchases, so I’m just trying to make the best of it. The issue is , I think they’re pretty cool, but not sure if they are worth displaying given that they are bone fragments. I was thinking maybe in a riker...also the issue of labeling...Below are three separate purchases. Group 1: The seller sold these in fragments. Several of these pieces I glued back together neatly with Paleo bond. The seller must’ve used some kind of thick glue originally because there are some marks, but it’s no big deal... anyway these were advertised as Albertosaurus bones... when I asked the seller why he labeled it as such, he said because it’s very probable? I asked him for a coa, and when I received it, it only said Tyannosaur bones... so I’m going to leave it at that...because it’s indeterminable. Even back then I knew Coa’s were pointless, but I always like asking for one, because I feel like it could possibly put a little pressure on the seller to be a somewhat more honest like it did in this case...however in most cases sellers don’t care: Tyrannosaur bone fragments: Judith River Formation, Northern Montana The other small miscellaneous pieces I don’t think can be glued back...no fit or match, just associated bones...What would you label the fossil as, and are they worth displaying?
  12. Thoughts on this Tyrannosaur tooth for sale from the Aguja Formation of Texas. 2" Seller indicates some resto has been done to the tip to make it complete.
  13. Tarbosaurus Tooth?

    Saw this tooth online recently, it already sold but it was listed as a Tarbosaurus Tooth but it reminds me more of a carcharodontosaurus tooth but then again I am unsure nor familiar with tarbosaurus teeth, what do you guys think? I have included all photos in the listing.
  14. The Utah Natural History museum held their annual DinoFest this weekend so I was able to get some great pictures of the new skeleton of Teratophoneus, 80% complete. The skull Here are some close ups of Teratophoneus teeth Now for the foot claws!
  15. Here's my Two Medicine formation collection from Montana. It's all Daspletosaurus besides one Saurornitholestes tooth. I'm hoping to get specimens of some of the Two Medicine herbivores in the future. Pics 2 and 3= Daspletosaurus tooth in matrix Pics 4 and 5= Daspletosaurus partial tibia Pics 6 and 7= Daspletosaurus toe bone partial Pics 8 and 9= Daspletosaurus vertebrae process Pics 10 and 11=Saurornitholestes tooth
  16. My T-Rex and Nanotyrannus teeth

    These are my T-Rex and Nanotyrannus teeth. I acquired most of them pretty recently. They are some of my most prized dinosaur fossils. I'll post my T-Rex/Nano bones soon as well. Pic 1 and 2= Nanotyrannus lancensis tooth, Hell Creek formation, South Dakota Pic 3,4,5= Nanotyrannus lancensis tooth, Hell Creek formation, Montana Pic 6,7,8= Tyrannosaurus rex tooth, Hell Creek formation, Montana Pic 9= Tyrannosaurus rex pieces and tips, Hell Creek formation, Montana Pic 10 and 11= Tyrannosaurus rex tooth, Hell Creek formation, Montana Pic 12= Nanatyrannus lancensis teeth, Hell Creek formation, Montana Pic 13= T-Rex and Nano fragments, Lance formation, Wyoming
  17. Judith River Tyrannosaur

    From the album Dinosaurs and Reptiles

    30 mm nicely preserved tyrannosaur tooth. As I understand, it is impossible to distinguish between Gorgosaurus, Daspletosaurus and Albertosaurus from Judith River Fm.
  18. Hey everyone! I came across a listing for a partial limb bone of a T Rex, where the seller states that you know it's from a T Rex because of the honeycomb structure of the interior bone. However, I was of the understanding that all theropods had this structure (please correct me if I'm wrong, I'm still learning). If that's the case, is there a way to tell if it's from a T Rex and not from another theropod? I can provide more photos if necessary.
  19. My most recent and most exciting acquisition, a giant partial vert from a tyrannosaurus rex from the hell creek formation of Montana. Nearly went into cardiac arrest that I was able obtain such a large specimen from t rex, so I thought I would share. It really fills up the dinosaur collection and feels like it weighs a ton, I think the dimensions are somewhere around 6.5 inchs or so long and 10.5 inchs tall if I remember, would've been alot taller if the process was still intact and I like how the giant pores are visible cause of the damage. Super massive piece, I was worried about it collapsing my shelve but it fits fine so far.
  20. Tyrannosaurid tooth?

    I acquired this tooth a while back from a seller who labeled this as daspletosaurus. He said it was collected in the Judith river formation. Is there any way to tell if this is correct? The Judith river formation according to Wikipedia has only two tyrannosaurs, deinodon and aublysodon (which is possibly a junior synonym of deinodon) so I'm guessing it's one of those? Any one know anything further?
  21. Tyrannosaurid indet.

    From the album Dinosaur teeth

    Tyrannosaurid indet. Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Javelina Formation Brewster County, Texas
  22. Struthiomimus or Nano?

    Hi everyone! I have another puzzle for you all! I REALLY appreciate your help identifying these bones, and even though I may never know what they really came from it is so interesting to propose and discuss possibilities. The majority of the bones I found this summer (in Montana) were really odd and hard to identify... They all came from roughly the same 5'x5' spot in the same formation. Anyways, this one is no doubt theropod. It's beautiful with awesome preservation aside from the whole 'missing an entire side' thing. Hopefully you can help me out! Thanks so much! More to come... ☺️ -Lauren P.S. Sorry for the white spots. Had to put it back together and haven't painted yet.
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