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Found 28 results

  1. Straight Outta Mesozoic

    As a graphic design artist I sometimes like to create some paleo-art and pop-art mash-ups. Please feel free to comment.
  2. Hello TFF, I was scanning through a really popular shopping website and for auction, 3 t rex teeth were for sale. They are not in the most perfect or beautiful condition but hopefully and at the moment, they are around my budget. I just wanted to make sure that they are actual t rex teeth not nanotyrannus as it can be sometimes confusing. Would really like to ask for your opinions. The photos may be a bit blurry and unfortunately, these are the only ones available. BTW, The largest tooth was found in two and had to be glued together. The rest were found as one piece. Thanks guys!
  3. My most recent and most exciting acquisition, a giant partial vert from a tyrannosaurus rex from the hell creek formation of Montana. Nearly went into cardiac arrest that I was able obtain such a large specimen from t rex, so I thought I would share. It really fills up the dinosaur collection and feels like it weighs a ton, I think the dimensions are somewhere around 6.5 inchs or so long and 10.5 inchs tall if I remember, would've been alot taller if the process was still intact and I like how the giant pores are visible cause of the damage. Super massive piece, I was worried about it collapsing my shelve but it fits fine so far.
  4. T-rex illustration

    Hey everyone! Here's my latest piece of paleoart, T-rex! I used ink and watercolors. I didn't want to color it the traditional green or brown so I looked at vultures for reference. I find it difficult to believe the theory that T-rex was exclusively a scavenger but I thought the vulture colors would make it look nasty. Hope you like it and I'd love to know what you all think! -Mike
  5. Hi, I purchased a gift for my wife for our wedding anniversary. Both me and my wife grew up loving Jurassic Park and being fascinated by dinosaurs and I have recently started to get into fossil collecting! We are going to Weymouth in the UK next year as well so hopefully will spend some time on The Jurassic Coast fossil hunting! The picture is a Fragment of a Juvenile Rib Bone. I purchased it offline from a seller who has good reviews etc apparently the specimen is from Mongolia. I have looked into T-rex fossils and the price of a genuine tooth which is crazy money so I decided to purchase this bone fragment. I noticed there's a resin substance on the Fossil like a varnish and it feels very light but just wondering if that is just to protect it. thanks a lot W
  6. New research says T. Rex couldn't run

    From my local university http://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/tyrannosaurus-rex-couldnt-run-says-new-research/
  7. what do think about this ? An EXTRA LARGE, Good Quality Tyrannosaurus rex tooth. This crown measures 2-5/8" and is thick (1-1/16"). The enamel has excellent color and patina. Excellent anterior and posterior serrations. Some root etchinng on crown. Tip is blunt - very typical with adult Rex teeth. Several cracks were stabilized. Is this a fault/ disadvantage ??
  8. Tyrannosaurus sp?

    Tyrannosaurus sp? from West Texas. No restoration or repair. 1 1/2".
  9. My Prehistoric Profile of the T.rex

    This is a Profile on the T.rex that I had written for English and would like to see what you all think and correct me on what is wrong about it! Tyrannosaurus Rex is one of the most famous of all non-avian dinosaurs to ever roam the earth, and is known by the name T-Rex. Well that is an incorrect wording as the correct way to write the animals name is T.rex. Very few people know this and is one of my life dreams to educate people about this. Tyrannosaurus means Tyrant Lizard king. The now outdated view of T.rex being a lizard with poor eye sight and lumbering, is incorrect. In all actuality Tyrannosaurus rex was a warm blooded feather coated bird that could run to 25 miles an hour and actually had the best eyesight the earth has ever witnessed with eye sight over 13 times more clear than a humans. The first clue of this is the fact Tyrannosaurus had front facing eyes, meaning it had perfect depth perception. We know this because of the recreation of the eyes based on the fossil skull, eye sockets, which indicated its eye was the size of a softball. T. rex’s binocular range was 55 degrees which is actually greater than that of a hawk, which is of course renowned for its remarkable vision. Mix this eyesight with a sense of smell better than a bloodhounds, and a complex bird brain, this would be a perfect predator. Tyrannosaurus needed all these advantages as its pray was far from defenseless. Its pray would have included Ankylosaurus, Triceratops and Hadrosaurus which all have hard armor or a thick tail to ram into the predator to hit it off its feet. Tyrannosaurus rex lived in North America about 70-66 million years ago in the Hell Creek formation that leads from Montana to Colorado and branch off into Utah and Canada. During the time of Tyrannosaurus, the Environment of Hell Creek was a flood plain, creeks, swamps and dry forests of conifer trees and ferns that dominated for millions of years. The Swamps were home to many creatures such as crocodiles, fish, lizards, small non-avian dinosaurs, amphibians, mammals and birds. Away from the swamps, you would find dry forests and plains, which had creatures such as Tyrannosaurus, Triceratops, Dakotaraptor, Pachycephalosaurus and an uncountable number of others, not including the thousands of plant and fungi species. Meanwhile giant pterosaurs roamed the sky, and giant marine lizards swam the oceans. All of this was the domain of the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex, an invasive species from Asia that came to America during the early cretaceous period through land bridges and shallow seas. They became the top predator, and knocked other predatory theropod dinosaurs off the throne of Top Predator. Tyrannosaurus, despite popular belief, was covered in soft downy feathers much like emus and ostrich. They only really had scales on the under side of the tail, while their legs and face would have skin like an ostrich leg. They also did not roar, and most likely cooed and/or quacked like a modern day bird. They cared for their young like a mother bird and would defend them from anything. The closest living relative of the Tyrannosaurus is now the Chicken, and it may surprise you to know Chickens can chase, catch and devour mice whole, much like the Tyrannosaurus assumingly. For the very last thing you need to know the T.rex comes from a group of animals called the Tyrannosaurids, this group includes the Dilong, Gorgosaurus, Albertosaurus and Tarbosaurus.
  10. Did i find a dinosaur bone?

    I was raking leaves in the backyard, and in the water of a tiny stream in the wooded/swamp area i found what appears to be a large, petrified bone of some kind. Who can tell me what it is? Its hard and brittle like rock and ive found native american artifacts in the same area. Found in Channahon, Illinois.
  11. Scale with my hand

    From the album Tyrannosaurus Rex

    66.8 - 66 mya, Hell Creek Formation, Garfield County, Montana, 3.75 inches on the edge and 3.28 inches straight
  12. T Rex tooth tip

    From the album My Fossils

    T Rex tooth tip from Harding County, SD Hell Creek Formation
  13. My First T Rex tooth

    I am so ecstatic to finally have my first T Rex tooth thanks to Troodon It is a beautiful tooth tip. Comes from Harding County, SD Hell Creek Formation
  14. Top view

    From the album Tyrannosaurus Rex

    66.8 - 66 mya, Hell Creek Formation, Garfield County, Montana, 3.75 inches on the edge and 3.28 inches straight
  15. Front view

    From the album Tyrannosaurus Rex

    66.8 - 66 mya, Hell Creek Formation, Garfield County, Montana, 3.75 inches on the edge and 3.28 inches straight
  16. Close-up of Serrations

    From the album Tyrannosaurus Rex

    66.8 - 66 mya, Hell Creek Formation, Garfield County, Montana, 3.75 inches on the edge and 3.28 inches straight
  17. Bottom

    From the album Tyrannosaurus Rex

    66.8 - 66 mya, Hell Creek Formation, Garfield County, Montana, 3.75 inches on the edge and 3.28 inches straight
  18. Serrations (Tyrannosaurus Rex)

    From the album Tyrannosaurus Rex

    66.8 - 66 mya, Hell Creek Formation, Garfield County, Montana, 3.75 inches on the edge and 3.28 inches straight
  19. Right Side (Tyrannosaurus Rex)

    From the album Tyrannosaurus Rex

    66.8 - 66 mya, Hell Creek Formation, Garfield County, Montana, 3.75 inches on the edge and 3.28 inches straight
  20. Quarter view (Tyrannosaurus Rex)

    From the album Tyrannosaurus Rex

    66.8 - 66 mya, Hell Creek Formation, Garfield County, Montana, 3.75 inches on the edge and 3.28 inches straight
  21. Left Side (Tyrannosaurus Rex)

    From the album Tyrannosaurus Rex

    66.8 - 66 mya, Hell Creek Formation, Garfield County, Montana, 3.75 inches on the edge and 3.28 inches straight
  22. My New Prehistoric Youtube Channel

    ROAR! Hi, I am The Prehistoric Master. I decided to start a new channel, to all us lovers of paleontology. So on the channel, you can expect to see something I call "Prehistoric News", where i'll inform you about the newest prehistoric discoveries. I will also upload videos, if I visit museums and places like that, get new posters, books, etc. I do not only love prehistoric life, I also colllect it. I have a big collection of fossils, that i'll show in a video, (when it's ready) and update with new videos, if I get more. Another idea i have is to make videos about PaleoArt. Who know's what the future will bring. So subscribe now to become a Dino, and join me on a fantastic journey back in time! ROAR! Here's a link to my channel: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqecyU9r7HA26B6y3UV03EQ I have already made 2 videos. Enjoy!
  23. T-Rex tooth

    From the album Dinosaur Fossils collection

    Tyrannosaurus rex Tooth Locality: Hell Creek, Montana, USA Geological Age: Cretaceous Specimen Size: 2" (straight measure)
  24. T-Rex tooth

    From the album Dinosaur Fossils collection

    Tyrannosaurus rex Tooth Locality: Hell Creek, Montana, USA Geological Age: Cretaceous Specimen Size: 2" (straight measure)
  25. T-Rex tooth

    From the album Dinosaur Fossils collection

    Tyrannosaurus rex Tooth Locality: Hell Creek, Montana, USA Geological Age: Cretaceous Specimen Size: 2" (straight measure)
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