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Found 65 results

  1. Hello, I was doing a study on the T. rex and Nanotyrannus teeth specimens I had, and I wanted to compare them against a list of known T. rex teeth with measurement. The paper: Dental Morphology and Variation in Theropod Dinosaurs: Implications for the Taxonomic Identification of Isolated Teeth (JOSHUA B. SMITH, DAVID R. VANN, AND PETER DODSON) contains a list of 115 T. rex teeth. To make it easier to compare and read the data, I combined the measurements into a single chart, added colors and lines for ease of reading, and added the size and names of the T. rex used in the study Feel free to refer to the below chart for T. rex teeth measurements. I had to split the chart into 2 due to size limitations, but if you want the full-sized PDF version (25 MB), please message me so I can send it to you by email. If you have any suggestions to improve readability, or have your own data to add, go ahead and post it here! I will be posting pics and measurements of my various T. rex and Nanotyrannus teeth here @Troodon
  2. Largest theropods

    We all know that spinosaurus is most possible to be the largest theropod. Spinosaurus was not very tall (in the hip) but it probably was heavier and longest that tyrannosaurus, giga and carcha. But, what is the second biggest theropod ever? (only carnivorous, not herbivorous like deinocheirus). I think, that tyrannosaurus rex is the second biggest theropod ever. Giganotosaurus and carcharodontosaurus was longest that t. rex, but not tallest and heavier. Giraffe is taller that elephant, but elephant is the biggest terrestrial mammal. Argentinosaurus, supersaurus, patagotitan, diplodocus, was longest that blue whale, but blue whale is the biggest animal ever.
  3. T-Rex Tooth?

    I found what looks like a couple t-rex teeth, there are 4 good size pieces and about 20 smaller pieces. Looks like a complete 2.5" tooth once I piece it together, maybe longer and another partial tooth. Is it T-rex? also what is the best way to glue the pieces together? Is it worth paying someone that knows what they are doing? Also would it be worth digging into that area and see if there are more?
  4. Tyrannosaurus rex Tooth

  5. Mesozoic soft tissue!.......?

    Ok, I just came across articles about soft tissue remains, apparently including some form of degraded blood, in a mosasaur. That of course, brings up the T-Rex soft tissue found, to me. I seem to understand what I keep reading, but I can’t help it, again I find myself thinking...Really? C’mon, REALLY??? Am I just misinterpreting the whole thing, or is there actually real, true, gen-u-ine unfossilized/in mineralized, preserved soft tissues and blood remains in these 70ish million year old “fully” umineralized animals? ...............HOW?????????????? How, when the rest of the animal, soft AND hard tissue has dissolved away so long ago, can any soft tissue remain? How do only small areas of the tissue remain? If conditions are so, that areas of soft tissue/blood residue remain, how do just small patches remain, but the parts immediately surrounding the patches have long since dissolved away? Conditions inside an intact bone, or intact stomach cavity, should be stable, shouldnt they? Not different from one centimeter to the next, especially so different that one spot dissolved dozens of millions of years ago, and the spot touching that one is still just sitting there, relatively preserved?
  6. Cretaceous dinosaur toe bones

    I have 8 Cretaceous dinosaur toe bones that I got from Judith river Montana. I was told some were Tyrannosaur and some were struthiomimus. I cannot tell if that is true or not and need your guys help. #1 #4. 1 #3. #2. #7 #6. #5. #8.
  7. I just came across this. According to seller it belongs to subadult T-Rex, found completely intact. I would like to know if it's real or fake. Thanks.
  8. Rex or nano tooth?

    Picked this up off the auction sight. Hell creek tooth out of Powder river county Montana. Not expecting a perfect ID. It's small and I know that makes em hard to ID. This guy is just shy of an inch and heavy for his size. I have meg teeth of comparable size that weigh nothing compared to this specimen. It does have some remaining serrations but not much. Anyway, regardless of nano or rex status I thought it was an interesting tooth.
  9. Not sure if this is the correct place for this, but looking to see if I could get some verification (Is it real? Good quality?) etc as I’m fairly new to collecting.
  10. I recently came across the young earth theory (the theory that earth is 10.000 years old and dinosaurs coexisted with humans and traveled with Noah and his ark) and of course i thought it was unfeasible but one common argument they keep having is why are we finding soft tissues, proteins and other biochemicals in fossils like triceratops, t-rex and other dinosaur bones of course that doesn't mean DNA BUT they shouldn't have been preserved because such biochemicals don't get preserved after so much time. Another one is that some old fossils are still close to the surface when they should be buried really deep. So what are your thoughts on these arguments, in my opinion this theory is ridiculous but i'd love to learn the answers. Thanks (PS sorry for asking that many questions these days its just that im new to the forum and have lots of questions)
  11. After the Velociraptor skull, I finally finished another very long project: the baby T. rex skull designed by Inhuman Species, a 3D printed museum quality fossil replica of a 2-3 years old Tyrannosaurus rex. I really love this project and I made a video of the making from the 3D printing to the painting - I hope you like it. If you're wondering, I 3D printed the skull with the Alfawise U30 in PLA plastic; please watch the video and turn on subtitles to learn more about the tools and the making processes. If your're addicted or interested in 3D printing, you can't miss those topics:
  12. What do you guys think about nanotyrannus? I thought it is a juvie tyrannosaurus but it's hands were bigger
  13. Hello All, I'm new to fossil collecting as well as this forum. I'm looking to pick up a T Rex tooth and came across the one in the attached images. I'm just wondering if you could help me verify that it is genuine? It comes from the Hell Creek formation so I believe it is, I just wanted to be sure. Also, if anyone has any reputable sources for T Rex teeth, that would be great to know as well (PM). Thanks in advance!! -Derek
  14. Which is the largest length of a maxillary and pre-maxillary tooth of a trex?
  15. Large Tyrannosaurus tooth

    Here is my premaxillary Tyrannosaurus rex tooth I own at 4.25 inches in length.
  16. Updated T.rex

    Cool article from Business Insider on the most accurate T.rex so far to date. This new exhibit is featured at the American Museum of Natural History, NYC also featuring the Tyrannosaur lineage. Really dig the new look! https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.businessinsider.com/what-paleontologists-got-wrong-about-tyrannosaurus-rex-2019-3
  17. Hi everybody, I've seen this daspletosaurus tooth, what do you think about that. Is It classificable like Daspletosaurus or indet. theropod tooth? The Sellers says that cane from Hells Creek formation Larfield 60x15mm Thanks
  18. Hey guys, Over 4 inches and was discovered in the famous Hell Creek formation
  19. My son and I recently started an education non-profit using fossils. Since the little kids love dinosaurs, we decided to include them in our programs. I do not know much about Dinosaur fossils but I am trying learning on the fly. There is no way we can pick up a full tooth or large bone from a T-Rex. our purchasing power is limited. I did find a dealer that has several partial teeth or tooth shards listed as T-Rex. They are affordable for us and did come from Hell Creek. I am apprehensive about buying any of them though because I do not want to drop any money on something called a T-Rex unless I can be fairly certain that is what it is. I do not possess enough knowledge to ID a partial tooth nor do I know if you even can correctly identify a tooth shard. I will put to this those here with far more knowledge than I have.... Can you ID a tooth shard as T-Rex and if that is possible, what would you look for ? Thank you in advance for any help that I can get
  20. Hello Fossil Forum, on the German version of our favorite auction site I found something strange. It’s a theropod tooth which looks to me like a tyrannosaurid tooth from Hell Creek formation. Nothing special so far but that the seller claims it’s an exceptionally well made replica! Is that possible?! If so, I feel no longer able to tell a real from a fake tooth. It would be the best tooth replica I’ve ever seen. How could the serration and enamel be faked so well? But if it’s real, why would the seller claim it’s not? Any opinions? I’m not planning to buy it, just curious... Regards, Vertebrate
  21. I'm still on the fence about if Nanotyannus l. is a valid genus or not. I used to be firmly on the "Juvenile T.rex" side with Carr but some arguments such as the odd limb proportions on "Bloody Mary", tooth counts in actual juvenile Tyrannosaurus like "Baby Bob", and there being two "types" of Tyrannosaurid teeth in Hell Creek with overlapping sizes but very different shapes which don't all seem to be cases of it being teeth from different parts of the mouth, have shifted me to being open to both sides. I suppose it does make ecological sense for there to be a medium-size carnivore in the same region as a very large predator as the prey taken would likely differ drastically. So while I'm undecided, I can certainly see either argument being true. But hypothetically speaking, if Nanotyrannus turns out to be a valid genus, what branch of the family tree exactly would it come from? Based off time and location I'd be tempted to say it's a Tyrannosaurinae like Tarbosaurus or Tyrannosaurus, but last I checked most definite members of that group tended to be a lot more robust. I also recall when it was first described, Gilmore called it a species of Gorgosaurus. The lean build and thinner teeth do align with Albertosaurinae, but they could be convergently evolved I suppose.
  22. Is this a Nanotyrannus tooth?

    I got this from a guy who found it at Montana the Hell Creek area. I was wondering if it was a Nanotyrannus Tooth or a different carnivore?
  23. This past Wednesday I got to meet Trix in person, and is she beautiful or what?? I immediately fell in love with her. I could have stayed and looked at her for hours, but it was crowded and sweltering in the building (all buildings actually) so we didn’t stay too long. We also toured the Museum of paleontology, but by the time I made it to the third floor (husband and child chose to sit that floor out) I practically ran through it, it was just too hot to stroll around leisurely anymore. So the photos aren’t my best, but it’s what you get.
  24. T-Rex tooth or not? And aubleysodon?

    Hi, I am new to the forum. I just got back from a dig with Paleoadventures. Had a great time! With their digs, you are allowed to keep common fossils (triceratops teeth, bone fragments), but anything commercial (t-rex teeth) must be bought for an additional fee and anything scientifically significant cannot be purchased. I found what was identified to me by the company as a T-Rex tooth. The attached field pics are all that I have at the moment (I have a couple more but it wouldn't let me upload more). I was told that it may cost $1500 to buy. It is being prepped and I will be contacted hopefully by the end of the month following full appraisal. I found this tooth myself in the "tooth draw" site, hell creek formation, South Dakota. I know it is genuine. My question is, how do I know for sure that it is a T-Rex tooth? I don't want to pay a premium price for something that might cost less if it were Albertasaurus or Nanotyrannasaurus or some other tyrannasaurid. What other tyrannasaurids can be found in the hell creek formation that it could be mistaken for? Are there any specific questions or information I should request before purchase? It measured approximately 2 inches long and appears to have serrations. The owner, Walter Stein, has a good resume and seems trustworthy, but I just want to make sure. I've Googled everything I can google and I'm driving myself nuts! Another curiosity....I also found what was explained to me to be a baby T-Rex tooth, but what was ultimately labelled as an "Aubleysodon" tooth. I didn't have the option to buy it because it was considered scientifically significant. Seems there is some debate regarding T-Rex, aubleysodon, and nanotyrannasaurus, regarding whether or not they are separate or the same. I also have a picture of it but couldn't upload. Any input?
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