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Found 694 results

  1. An absolute monster of a jaw section I recently prepped from the Yorkshire coast. Only a partial so shows how big it would have been. This is actually part of another block I’m currently working on, containing another section of jaw along with a tonne of other bone from the beast. There’s also a neural arch from a vertebrae sat in there too. The bigger block is not far off finished so I will post that once acid treatment is finished. Thanks for looking
  2. Thames fossil, tree?

    Hi all, I'm new to this forum and wondering if you could all help me out. I found this fossil on the Thames foreshore in London at low tide. I would love to know what it came from! My only thought is that one side looks like rings of a tree and 2 other sides look a bit like bark. Would be very grateful for any help! Thanks
  3. Caudal vertebra or phalanx?

    Collected at Bouldnor on the Isle of Wight, and is about 33 million years old (Bouldnor Formation). This site produces a variety of mammals, turtles, crocodilians, birds, lizards, fish and amphibians. I am torn between labelling this a small caudal vertebra or phalanx. One end is unfortunately broken while the other is concave, with a rounded socket-like face to it. Measures 17mm long.
  4. Show us your associated dentitions

    Hi guys i haven’t really seen a topic where people shared associated dentitions, if they have that would be cool to know this can be any sort of animal and any amount of association ( ie im not talking about a whole shark)! Here is my first contribution have fun!
  5. Hi guys. It's been a while as always when it comes to posting on here. Plenty of reason, too long to go into. I hope everybody is doing as well as they can be during this pandemic. Now onto the good stuff. A while back, I posted my phylloceras in a sorry state of affairs, sections missing everywhere, cracks everywhere. Basically it didn't look fantastic. You'll be able to find it somewhere on here from previous posts. Well, lockdown happened here in the uk, which means there was only one thing to do during this time, and that was to get to work in the workshop and finish a lot of stuff. This was was number one priority as I had been putting it off for so long. And here it is All the cracks we're filled in and painted up, there is a small section on the bottom that has been done and finished since I took this photo. There was a section of the outer whorl that had blown out and was none existent, and replaced by shale, probably some form of gas build up happened inside it and blew it out and destroying it. I then had to make a choice of rebuilding it, or figuring something else out. I decided to go against rebuilding, due to lack of experience and the fact it was such a large section, it probably wouldn't have looked quite right. Luckily, I have plenty of dactylioceras specimens of all shapes and sizes, and decided to filll the section with these, you do find these ammonites washed into the mouth borders of pyllos, so iv stuck with what would be there. I don't even know how many hours went into this any more, but it was a lot, and its definitely something that has forced me to improve as a preperator. I'm currently building a metal stand for it, as it weighs a fair amount and no plastic stand will hold it. It now finally sits proudly in my collection and probably always will I hope you all enjoy my work, and i'll be posting more regularly from now on due to a second lockdown in the uk. I actually have a rather large crocodile block i'm working on currently, including a rostrum, vertebrae ribs, teeth etc, theres a lot going on and it'll probably take a long time to complete due to the size and the fact that the majority of the work will involve using acid to remove everythign, either way, it'll certainly be a stunning piece once complete. Oh, and a rather large icthyosaur block measuring over two foot. (yes i have my work cut out for me haha) Thanks. Dan
  6. Bird Pelvis Fragment?

    After having another look at one of my bone fragments from the Bouldnor Formation (Isle of Wight, UK), the closest match i have been able to find is a bird acetabulum, as circled in the diagram below. But i am not an expert on avian anatomy. Can anyone else offer any insight? @Auspex Specimen is approx. 33 million years old. The Bouldnor Formation on the Isle of Wight produces a wide variety of mammals, turtles, crocodilians, birds, fish, lizards and amphibians. Measures 29 mm at its longest. The 'socket' which i think may be the acetabulum is 12.5mm in diameter.
  7. Burnham on crouch hunt

    Hi guys yesterday I went to burnham on crouch in the hopes that storms would have cleared the silt but that wasn’t the case, it was a mudbath this silt catches on teeth, on scoring then and making it hard to find anything so although I didn’t find much I’ll share what I did with you here are some photos of the site, you can see the mud, also for people who want to hunt here in the future I have drawn lines to show where to hunt
  8. Lyme Regis Brachiopods

    While looking at one of the shells in my collection that i had originally thought was a bivalve, from the stretch of beach between Lyme Regis and Charmouth, in Dorset (UK), another glance made me realize it is in fact a brachiopod: symmetry in plan view, asymmetrically sized valves in lateral view. So i dug out my British Mesozoic Fossils book and have identified it confidently as Cincta numismalis, which the book lists as occurring within the "Jamesoni Zone" of the Lower Lias at Radstock in Somerset. I am not familiar with the brachiopods of the Lower Lias at Lyme Regis in Dorset, but a quick search online using Fossilworks and plain google failed to show any other occurrences of this species from Lyme Regis. Do any of the Lias collecters here know if this is a common/widespread brachiopod taxon in both Somerset and Dorset?
  9. Possible Pachystropheus bone?

    Hi, I am thinking this could possibly be a Pachystropheus centrum or neural arch. Could I be correct? It's from Aust cliffs, UK. The longest side is exactly 2cm long. Many thanks.
  10. Sauropod vertebra?

    Any thoughts on this? Being sold as sauropod cetiosaurus vertebra from Kimmeridge Clay. 11cm x 12 x 5.5 The hole at the bottom, seller says is predation from a scavenger -- size and shape matching croc or pliosaur. I'm suspecting plesiosaur, looking at a drawing of cetiosaur verts I found online. This one seems too rounded. Any thoughts, much appreciated. Attached the drawing below too.
  11. Thames Foreshore Bones

    Hello, A few days ago, me and my dad had to travel to London to get my American passport renewed at the US embassy. Afterwards, my dad headed towards the cafe to get something to eat as I took a stroll along the thames foreshore. I quickly realized that there were a lot of bones and teeth scattered along the shoreline, at the time I thought they were pleistocene, but now that I've looked online it seems to me that they're "medieval", apparently the tudors and georgians habitually tossed dead animal carcasses into the river. Even so, some of the teeth I picked up were very heavy and I couldn't help thinking that they could be pleistocene. Is there a possibility of them being pleistocene or is it all wishful thinking on my part? I reckon photo 2 is a bison tooth although am not sure. Photo 3 looks like two sheep teeth. The jaw seems to be from a domesticated pig (so probably something the georgians tossed into the river) and I believe the canine in the last photo comes from a dog. Can anyone ID the rest of the teeth and whether they are pleistocene or not? Thanks Here are the photos, hopefully they help:
  12. Charmouth bone?

    Hi all, thank you for letting me join and post our find. My kids found this fossil(?) on Charmouth beach in the UK a few years ago. We didn't think it was anything until a family friend pointed out that it looked like a vertebrae or pelvis bone of some kind. I have no idea honestly so my apologies if that is a ridiculous thing to say. We are hoping it is a dinosaur bone, but any kind of fossil would be amazing, especially for my son who is 10 and LOVES dinosaurs and fossils. We hope you can help and I hope the pictures are okay. Please let me know if you need different photos and thank you all so much for your help and contributions to people.
  13. Warden Point UK, Animal, Mineral or Vegetable?

    Hi, I am new to the forum and glad to be amongst fellow enthusiasts. I recently made a rather wet and windy visit to Warden Point (Kent, UK). Amongst the usual pyritised shells, seed pods and wood on the foreshore I found 4 items that totally escape me and I would be grateful if any of you could provide any pointers. The first appeared to be a tooth but on closer examination seems to be either a conical piece of coral or a shell? The second seems to be a small section or articulation but I’ve no idea if this would be plant or animal? The third look like a section of bone with an appearance of flesh like indentations. On the final piece my mind was totally confused. Whilst I know pyritises can take on odd shapes but I started to convince myself that this was a small skull (2 eye orbits and a nose section) highly unlikely but worth asking the question. Many thanks for any help you can offer. Whatever the outcome I had a fine day and even bumped into the remains of a WWII sound mirror – an acoustic forerunner of radar, lying on the shore with an actual concrete radar station that had slipped down the cliff face intact, amazing. Best regards Keith
  14. Large Ichthyosaur Vertebra, Penarth, Wales

    Hey everyone, I recently acquired this ichthyosaur vertebra that was originally collected in Penarth, south Wales, UK. What initially struck me was the vertebra's size, since it's by far the biggest one I have of any ichthyosaur: Now, other large ichthyosaur remains have been described from the very same location. The paper is freely available here: https://bioone.org/journals/acta-palaeontologica-polonica/volume-60/issue-4/app.00062.2014/A-Mysterious-Giant-Ichthyosaur-from-the-Lowermost-Jurassic-of-Wales/10.4202/app.00062.2014.full The cliffs at Penarth apparently contain multiple exposures of different formations, which can make assigning isolated remains from there to any one time period problematic. The authors tentatively date the bone described in the paper to the lowermost Jurassic based on attached matrix and microfossils it contains. Finding references for the sediment of each formation from this locality is tough, but the matrix on my vertebra resembles that in the paper at least superficially. I have tried contacting Dr. Peggy Vincent, a co-author of the study who works on Jurassic marine reptiles from Europe, but sadly no luck thus far. My questions are: - Are there any features that might help date this fossil to a certain time period, or identify the formation it originated from? - The authors of the study assign their fossil to Shastasauridae - are there any features that can identify this vertebra on a family level? Thank you for your help!
  15. I have these fossils here from the early Jurassic, Northamptonshire. I was wondering if the one on the left could possibly be a coprolite, or some other fossil, although most likely not. It does stick to the tounge. I also have these bumps on bits of rock, and was wondering if they could possibly be due to bivalves? And lastly, a slightly curved thing that has equal thickness which I have no clue what it is. Many thanks
  16. Hey guys, i just posted a new video of two fossils hunts i recently had on the Yorkshire Coast. Feel free to watch if interested. I found an awesome nautilus and some really cool Ichthyosaur Bones.
  17. Ammonites Galore

    Here's a fossil hunting video I recently filmed where i had a very productive day. Feel free to watch if you're interested.
  18. Hi everyone, hopefully someone may be able to help. We went to Runswick Bay in North Yorkshire, UK today (my personal favourite place to look for Fossils!). I'm a VERY casual collector and an absolute amateur at it to boot. Our dog is also blind so half the time I'm making sure he's walking okay and he isn't falling over things so I don't get to properly roam like I used to. Anyway, amongst picking up an almost complete Belemite, a Belemite fragment and some Ammonite fragments and prints, I also picked up 5 rocks that I've no idea what they are but thought they were curious. One of them I'm almost certain is a fossil, it's the grey one that has a little peak top that's almost gold (which doesn't show well in the photo but in the right light, it has a gold shine to) but I don't know what it's a fossil of. I'm assuming some sort of crustacean. It's a shame I can't prep it as I'm sure it would reveal something or other. That said, it's also possible it's just a fancy piece of rock. The other 4, I've no idea what they are. I've most likely just got a pile of 4/5 interesting looking rocks which, if they are, is still cool. I tend to use them to decorate the edge of my patio pond (the fossils that aren't that perfect or ones I've brought home and then on closer inspection, realised its just a rock, ha!) I read the rules on taking photos of the fossils and have taken an awful lot of each of the 5, so here's a link to my Google Album with them all in. I've made the album so people should be able to view the photos. Tried taking from various angles etc. As there's a lot of each one, I don't suppose I'll get many/any replies but I figured this would be the best place where I MIGHT find someone who can tell me for sure if I have anything interesting or just some neat looking rocks. There's also one of our dog in there for cuteness. As we were walking back from the fossil area we tend to sit around and root for fossils, he went into cracker dog and had just dug some holes in the sand!! https://photos.app.goo.gl/dXLFRusYfRdwACco9
  19. A fossil hunt I filmed recently, which ended up being surprisingly productive. Hopefully you enjoy.
  20. A lucky find has revealed evidence of dinosaurs in Scotland outside of the Isle of Skye for the first time. A single bone, thought to belong to a Stegosaur, was quite literally stumbled upon on the small Scottish island of Eigg. The bone, measuring 500mm, is believed to be from the Middle Jurassic (166 myo). Read more at the BBC here: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-highlands-islands-53917742
  21. In the past couple of months, I'd been to lavernock quite a few times looking for fossils. Usually each session would produce some nice assorted bits of bone and ammonite fragments, nothing too out of the ordinary. But lately, I've began finding quite a few bits of pleistocene bone there. I checked online but nothing really came up regarding pleistocene bones and etc, in Lavernock. I looked online and something came up which said that the bristol channel used to be a glacier? Which got me thinking that there's probably a pleistocene deposit at the bottom of the bristol channel which slowly washes bones ashore as I've only really found the bones on a very, very low tide. But I honestly don't know. Does anyone have any idea as to why I'm finding these bones at Lavernock? Here they are if you're interested: P1 and P2 are various bones, not sure about identification. P3 is a Bison tooth next to a deer tooth. Thanks!
  22. Hello on my first fossil hunt today in UK coast I found the below shark tooth and this which looks like a fossil but I am not sure. any ideas if this is something? If you turn it lengthways I looks like a head with teeth and the type of shark tooth? Both were found with lots of fossilised tree
  23. Hi and Help

    Hi. I’m new to fossil hunting and collecting its a little hobby my 8 year old son enjoys. We came across this on the beach last year and I have no idea how to open it and if it is a ammonite. Any advice would be very much appreciated.
  24. I found this tooth in a river in the Peak District in the UK. Unsure what it is. I also found an oddly shaped stone not far from there. Please find to follow pictures of the tooth. Thank you.
  25. Looks like we have a new dinosaur from the UK: Vectaerovenator inopinainopinatus The University of Southampton has confirmed that vertebrae discovered at Shanklin on the Isle of Wight in 2019 belong to a new species of Cretaceous era theropod. Believed to be up to 4m long, the dinosaur had notably hollow bones. "Chris Barker, a PhD student at the university who led the study, said: “We were struck by just how hollow this animal was — it’s riddled with air spaces. Parts of its skeleton must have been rather delicate"." News article: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.bbc.com/news/amp/uk-england-hampshire-53738762 Full publication expected in 'Papers in Palaeontology' soon.
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