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Found 589 results

  1. UK Ichthyosaur or Pliosaur Tooth

    Hello, I recently got a hold of this tooth from an old collection in the UK. I am unsure if this tooth wouldve come from a ichthyosaur or a pliosaur since the root is absent and I'm not expert in this material, so any feedback that help figure this tooth out is appreciated.
  2. Hello, I found this fossil in Northamptonshire, UK. I'm not certain what it is, my best guess would be a belemnite. Sorry for the bad quality. Thanks.
  3. Jurassic jaw fragment ?

    Hi I’m new to this forum. My son and I love fossils and we found a few interesting ones on a recent trip to the Jurassic south coast of England. Can anyone help with the identification of this fragment of bone we picked out of the sticky, Jurassic, Oxford Clay? The bone fragment seems to hold the remains of a small tooth? Its only 2.5cm long in total. Thanks Matt
  4. Bracklesham bay - Sunday

    Making the most of the UK sun and the ability to go outside I hunted two areas, the London clay produces the pyrite bivalves and wood the teeth come from the bracklesham fish beds which is slightly younger but both are Eocene the bivalves with shells on come from the venericor beds which are in between the two in terms of age I can take photos of the photos later today but here is the view from the top of the cliff and a section of the pyrite bivalve conglomerate
  5. Planohybodus

    Hi, everyone. I found this tooth earlier and I think it could be planohybodus but I’m not sure. Can anyone identify it? It was found in Dorset, UK in the forest marble formation which is bathonian, Jurassic. It measures 20mm. Thanks.
  6. Carboniferous Cyclus

    These are 7 of my best Cyclus from the Coal Measures of Derbyshire UK that i have collected over many years they range in size from 20mm to 12mm. I find these arthropods fascinating John.
  7. UK Estate Sales

    I have seen estate sales mentioned now and then by members in the USA. People selling off a loved ones collection. Reality of life unfortunately Have tried a Google search for similar here in the UK, but didn't come up with much. Would any UK members be able to provide any info / websites advertising such? Thanks
  8. Fossil hunting in the UK

    Since i am going to the UK next week i stumbled on a website that gives a good overview and might be helpfull for anyone else visiting the UK. The locations shared are all coastal as far as I could tell, but it gives an overview of locations, geologic info, what can be found etc. http://www.discoveringfossils.co.uk/fossil-hunting-locations_of-great-britain/ Best regards
  9. Hybodontid shark teeth

    Hello everyone I found these shark teeth a while ago in Dorset and I remember posting them on the forum after I’d just broken them into pieces . I’ve since, glued them together but am not sure of the species. They were found in the bathonian of the forest marble formation and the larger one measures 15mm while the smaller one measures 5mm. I’m really sorry for the bad photos but it’s the best I could get. I think the larger one is asteracanthus sp. but I’m totally in the dark with the smaller one. Does anyone know what species they are? thanks in advance
  10. Hi, just going through some rocks I brought back from Norfolk, UK, thinking quite a few may be fossils (I didn't have long so just grabbed anything I thought looked suspiciously organic by intuition) and as it turns out I think I was quite correct in a number of cases - I think I have quite a few pieces of whale and and a few little bits of mammoth tooth. Trying to confirm this to myself led to a lot of reading and learning online about the local geological formations involved and also whale anatomy, both new topics for me which I always enjoy delving into - part of the enjoyment of fossil hunting for me - I'm less of someone looking for beautiful specimens for display (though I'm not going to turn those down!) and more someone who loves the detective work of trying to identify obscure parts and recreate some aspect of the vanished world before us from its traces. And searching through whale anatomy and what these weird chunks could be I came across a picture of a whale periotic and realised that the weird little pot structure I had was almost definitely one of these, which if I am correct is good because I believe they are one part of a fragmented whale anatomy that is quite diagnostic. Also I then realised that a strangely hooked piece I found right next to it could well be the tympanic! The preservation here is unusual because many theorise that these kind of whale fossils were first laid down in sandstone in the Miocene when Norfolk was covered with a shallow warm sea, and then later in the Pliocene and early Pleistocene when temperatures dropped sea levels dropped too and the area became land (part of the reason the geology of this area is interesting is the constant transgression and regression of the sea over a few million years), these Miocene rocks were eroded away and the harder fossils reworked into new estuarine or nearshore sediments of this era, often but not always with a layer of hard iron-rich concretion coating them which helped protect them (I guess one question would be, is there anyway of easily removing this hard concretion layer?) So if I am right, these are bones from Miocene whales (many showing signs of shark damage), reburied in the Pliocene / Early Pleistocene and then finally eroded out again in the modern day - quite a journey! Anyway, enough background, for starters I'd love to see what people think about this periotic / tympanic. Am I right? Here's a summary of my findings (note I used a pic of dolphin periotic someone posted here for comparison so I hope that isn't too cheeky)
  11. Iguanodon Vertebra?

    Along with the Daspletosaurus and Alberta fossils I have been looking at in trying to get. I’ve have also been looking at some European Dinosaur fossils to get. I have found this and am wondering if it’s a IGUANODON vertebra?, or another animal? It’s from the Isle of Wight, England. Thank you!!
  12. A few of my ammonites collected from the Inferior Oolite at both coastal and inland quarry sites in Dorset, UK.
  13. My first post of a few fossils from my collection. This is a fish, found in a quarry in Swanage, Dorset, England, where the Intermarine Beds of the Purbeck Group of limestones are exposed, in order to extract building stones. These "Middle Purbeck Beds" are actually the Stair Hole Member of the Durlston Formation of the Purbeck Group, being deposited at Mediterranean latitudes in a vast system of brackish to freshwater lagoons and lakes. The shallow water limestone beds sometimes have dinosaur footprints on their upper surfaces. The photos show the two fish found (after prepping) which have been recently re-named Callipurbeckia (formerly Lepidotes) minor. The larger of the two is 27cm in length.
  14. Ilminster, UK

    Has anyone been to the fields of Ilminster, Somerset, UK recently? I heard it’s good for ammonites and would like to know if it’s been ploughed recently. Thanks in advance
  15. Hi everyone, looking for some help in identifying some corals from the two beds in the Scottish Lower Limestone Formation, the Hurlet Limestone and the Blackhall Limestone. Both are Visean, Brigantian in age. Any help much appreciated! @TqB I'm hoping you might recognise them right away First these smaller specimens, all are from various outcrops across Scotland of the Blackhall Limestone. The largest 34mm long. Another from the Blackhall Limestone, this ones a bit larger at 85mm. Another from the slightly older Hurlet Limestone this time, 55mm long.
  16. Hey folks... Here is a question that came up today at work. Did anyone find fossils in all the rock that was brought to the surface when the Chunnel was being built? Did any of you folks in southern UK and northern France get to have a look at these rocks? Thanks
  17. Does anyone recognise this? I noticed it when scanning photos of a recently cut and polished piece of Frosterley "Marble" from Weardale, Co. Durham, UK. (upper Mississippian, Pendleian). It shows in section as a rod about 5mm long, with perforations, central ridge and a fine reticulate pattern. My first thought was a Fenestella fragment but it doesn't look regular enough and I can find no mention of the reticulate structure. Also, I've never seen bryozoans in this part of the limestone though they occur at other levels. Now I'm wondering about a dasycladacean alga - some look vaguely similar but all the Carboniferous ones I can find references to look simpler and fuzzier. Scale bar is 1cm, divisions are 1mm Contrast enhanced In context, showing ghostly appearance amongst the corals
  18. Here are some fish vertebrae from the Isle of Sheppey, UK, which I would like to trade. They are from the London clay (Eocene aged). I have collected on the Isle of Sheppey a few times and have never found any fish fossils anywhere near as good as this. I am interested in anything from the upper Carboniferous of the UK or the USA, or Dinosaur teeth from any location. Thanks, Daniel
  19. Oxford Clay Vert ID Needed

    2 verts that I purchased a few years ago and would like an accurate ID. I will provide as many photos as possible. This first vert was sold to me as Cetiosaurus. Is this sauropod, or plesiosaur? Location: Oxford Clay, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, England Age: Upper Jurassic - Oxfordian
  20. Dinosaur Bone from the Isle of Wight, UK

    A recent find from the stretch of beach between Chilton Chine and Grange Chine on the Isle of Wight, England. It is from the Wessex Formation, about 130 million years old (Early Cretaceous). The bone is quite rolled by the sea but there are still some features remaining and so i was hoping it could still be identified, at least perhaps the type of bone that it is (either the end of some kind of long bone or a metapodial. Length= 4.4 cm; width= 3.8 cm; height= 1.9 cm). I was leaning towards a proximal radius or metatarsal but i would like a second opinion. The shape of the shaft cross section, in the fifth photo, is roughly triangular (where the bone would continue). The most common dinosaurs from this deposit are ornithopods such as Iguanodon and Hypsilophodon, so these would provide the best comparison. Thanks all!
  21. Oxford University Museum of Natural History (May take some time for me to upload all of the pics, so give or take 30 min) My thing is if I’m traveling to another country, I love seeing a varied collection of fossils at the museum found in that same country. This was exactly that. Stunning and one of my favorites. Positives: If you are looking for Mesozoic everything, this museum is for you - much important paleontology history here Many fossils on display from many eras Organized, convenient More actual fossils than replicas Some curve ball specimens (more impressive, less known ones on display that I did not anticipate on seeing prior) You leave telling yourself you would like to go back. Negatives: No complaints that I can think of really, just tough taking pics with the glare from the glass, but that’s always the case. My vote is 9/10 for dinosaur lovers considering quality, not quantity...anyhow there is definitely your fair share, with jaw dropping displays, literally. My favorite two were Megalosaurus bucklandii and a gigantic Pliosaur jaw that you will find in the pics. Enjoy the mini tour, tried to cover as much as I could.
  22. I've spent a fair amount of time now combing the beaches around Lyme Regis and Charmouth in Dorset, England, and thought i would put together a topic that presents all of my marine reptile bone finds (so far) in one place. The fossils here are Early Jurassic in age, approx. 195-190 million years old and come predominantly from the Blue Lias and Charmouth Mudstone formations. I first visited this area in 2013 with the simple goal of finding at least one ichthyosaur vertebra, and now after three subsequent trips in 2014, 2017 and 2019, i've put together a far better assortment of finds than i could have possibly hoped for! I think i have been quite lucky along this coastline, although it has taken many hours to amass this collection. Across all four of my England trips i have spent a total of 18 days looking for bones in the Lyme Regis area, most often on the stretch of beach between Lyme Regis and Charmouth but sometimes at Monmouth Beach as well. This coastline also produces a large quantity and diversity of ammonites, belemnites, crinoids, bivalves, brachiopods, gastropods, and even rare insects. However i've always been most interested in fossil vertebrates, and so the ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs that are found here have been my primary target for collecting. There are also some impressive articulated fish to be found, but as yet i have had no luck in finding any! Ichthyosaur bones are the most common type of vertebrate fossil in the area, particularly their bi-concave vertebrae. Less commonly you can also find pieces of the jaw, sometimes with teeth. If you are extra lucky though you may also find plesiosaur bones, which for whatever reason are much rarer than those of ichthyosaurs. The best way to find any type of marine reptile bone around Lyme Regis is to closely examine the shingle on the beach, and i've spent seemingly countless hours bent over and slowly walking along the shore looking for them. If you have a bad back it's even more difficult! I've learnt that bones can be found pretty much anywhere on the beach: in the slumping clays, at the top of the beach in the 'high and dry' shingle, along the middle of the beach, at the low tide line, and also underwater amongst the rocky pools and ledges. And just when i start to think that the beach has already been heavily searched and there isn't much left to find, there always seems to be another bone that turns up, often lying in plain sight. The truth is that most people who visit here to collect are not experts and will probably walk past a lot of these bones, as the texture is the most important thing that gives them away and learning to recognise it takes a bit of time. For the sorts of articulated skeletons that sometimes make news headlines and are beautifully intact, searching the shingle is not the way to go, but for a short term visitor like me i think it is the best way of maximising the chances of finding any sort of reptile bone in the shortest amount of time (and something i can take back with me on the plane too!). Without further ado, here are the pics (spread across multiple posts due to file size limits). I've also included as-found pictures for some of these finds to provide a sense of what they look like and how they are found when they are on the beach. The collection so far. Starting first with my favourite Lyme Regis fossil, this is a very nice plesiosaur vertebra that is in great condition! A very rare find! I have been very fortunate to find two plesiosaur vertebrae at Lyme Regis so far, although this one is smaller and more beach-worn than the previous example. Continued below.
  23. Ichthyosaur Collection

    Hi Here’s another fossil I found over Christmas. These bones are pretty rare and are the articulated ischium and pubis from an ichthyosaur. No prep involved apart from cutting the block to size and applying a thin coat of varnish to increase the contrast between the bone and matrix. The fossil is from the Hettangian of Penarth. The block before:
  24. Alethopteris sp?

    I recently obtained this plant fossil in a trade. It comes from the Kent coal measures (UK), upper Carboniferous. I suspect it is Alethopteris sp, though the pinnules are smaller than any species of Alethopteris I can find. Any ideas what it may be? Thanks, Daniel
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