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Found 21 results

  1. Unknown Vert- Dino??

    I have had this piece just sitting in a drawer for a long time and I believe that I bought it for $1.00 from a guy that I use to get some Oligocene White River stuff from in Scenic, South Dakota. This piece looks nothing like anything that I have ever found in the White River Badlands, and believe he got it from somewhere farther North in South Dakota. Looking at it, it looks dinosaurian and am wondering what others think? @Troodon Thanks
  2. Help iD please

    Hi everyone. I have this specimen I picked up at a Fossil show. It looks to me like crinoid Stem very and a Stern impression. It was provided for auction at southern Illinois fossil show which I paid $1 and was provided from a Fossil club somewhere in Southern Illinois. Please could I find out exactly what it is and if my ID is correct. On the other side is a groove about 1 inch long and also head grooves like Stem impressions. Thank you
  3. What is this?

    I found this in my friends “no scaping” rocks in his front yard. I have no idea where it comes from originally, but thought it was pretty cool. Any idea what it might be?
  4. Help with i.d. on possible coral

    Hi everyone. I recently purchased a 55 year rock collection. My friend has decided he's done with his lapidary pursuits. I was going through some of the many boxes, and I found what I believe to be a chunk of fossil coral. He didn't remember where he found it, and we have a friendly disagreement regarding fossil coral vs pet wood. Any thoughts would be appreciated. They spent most of their time traveling the western states, but did make a trip to Australia.
  5. Fake, pseudo fossil?

    First off, I have no idea where or when this was found originally. There is a house about 6-7 blocks from my apt that has recently gone up for sale. The people have since moved out. Out in front of the house in the area between the sidewalk & street itself, they (or someone else) had placed a border of railroad ties, then partially filled that with river rock. They then added several larger basalt rocks, quartz clusters, limb casts, small fossils, polished stones & several other stones of various types & sizes. I "rescued" this from there. I mean hey, they moved out & left them all there, so someone should take care of them, right? Anywho, this item is 3.75 inches or 9.5 cm tall x 8.5 inches or 21.5 cm around. Looks interesting to say the least. Seems to be at least partially agatized. I know it's worn, but it can't be helped considering.
  6. goniatite ammonoid UL b1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Goniatite Ammonoid Unknown location; probably Morocco, possibly Timor Middle Devonian – Late Permian (390–251.4 Million Years Ago) This was a gift. I know the dealer who SOLD it, I know where HE got it. This "original" dealer sells ammonoids from all over, but polished ones are either Morocco or Timor. Because the exact location is unknown, I cannot supply a more definitive age for this fossil. Goniatids, informally Goniatites, are ammonoid cephalopods that form the Order Goniatiida, derived from the more primitive Anarcestida during the Middle Devonian some 390 million years ago. Goniatites (goniatitida) survived the Late Devonian extinction to flourish during the Carboniferous and Permian only to become extinct at the end of the Permian some 139 million years later.All goniatites possessed an external shell, which is divided internally into chambers filled with gas giving it Buoyancy during the life of the animal. An open chamber at the front of the shell provided living space for the goniatitid animal, with access to open water through an aperture. The general morphology and habit of goniatites was probably similar to that of their later relatives the ammonites, being free swimming and possessing a head with two well developed eyes and arms (or tentacles). The typical goniatitid has a suture with smooth saddles and lobes, which gives the name "goniatitic" to this particular suture pattern. In some the sutures has a distinctive "zigzag" pattern Not all goniatitid ammonoides have goniatitic sutures. In some the sutures are ceratitic, in others, even ammonitic. Nor are goniatitic sutures limited to the Goniatidia. The sutures of nautiloids are by comparison somewhat simpler, being either straight or slightly curved, whereas later ammonoids showed suture patterns of increasing complexity. One explanation for this increasing extravagancy in suture pattern is that it leads to a higher strength of the shell. ***SPECIAL NOTE*** - The "flashy" bit in the first photo is NOT Ammolite or some such mineral - It is merely a reflection from my flash on the camera. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Subclass: †Ammonoidea Order: †Goniatitida
  7. goniatite ammonoid UL b1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Goniatite Ammonoid Unknown location; probably Morocco, possibly Timor Middle Devonian – Late Permian (390–251.4 Million Years Ago) This was a gift. I know the dealer who SOLD it, I know where HE got it. This "original" dealer sells ammonoids from all over, but polished ones are either Morocco or Timor. Because the exact location is unknown, I cannot supply a more definitive age for this fossil. Goniatids, informally Goniatites, are ammonoid cephalopods that form the Order Goniatiida, derived from the more primitive Anarcestida during the Middle Devonian some 390 million years ago. Goniatites (goniatitida) survived the Late Devonian extinction to flourish during the Carboniferous and Permian only to become extinct at the end of the Permian some 139 million years later.All goniatites possessed an external shell, which is divided internally into chambers filled with gas giving it Buoyancy during the life of the animal. An open chamber at the front of the shell provided living space for the goniatitid animal, with access to open water through an aperture. The general morphology and habit of goniatites was probably similar to that of their later relatives the ammonites, being free swimming and possessing a head with two well developed eyes and arms (or tentacles). The typical goniatitid has a suture with smooth saddles and lobes, which gives the name "goniatitic" to this particular suture pattern. In some the sutures has a distinctive "zigzag" pattern Not all goniatitid ammonoides have goniatitic sutures. In some the sutures are ceratitic, in others, even ammonitic. Nor are goniatitic sutures limited to the Goniatidia. The sutures of nautiloids are by comparison somewhat simpler, being either straight or slightly curved, whereas later ammonoids showed suture patterns of increasing complexity. One explanation for this increasing extravagancy in suture pattern is that it leads to a higher strength of the shell. ***SPECIAL NOTE*** - The "flashy" bit in the first photo is NOT Ammolite or some such mineral - It is merely a reflection from my flash on the camera. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Subclass: †Ammonoidea Order: †Goniatitida
  8. goniatite ammonoid UL b1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Goniatite Ammonoid Unknown location; probably Morocco, possibly Timor Middle Devonian – Late Permian (390–251.4 Million Years Ago) This was a gift. I know the dealer who SOLD it, I know where HE got it. This "original" dealer sells ammonoids from all over, but polished ones are either Morocco or Timor. Because the exact location is unknown, I cannot supply a more definitive age for this fossil. Goniatids, informally Goniatites, are ammonoid cephalopods that form the Order Goniatiida, derived from the more primitive Anarcestida during the Middle Devonian some 390 million years ago. Goniatites (goniatitida) survived the Late Devonian extinction to flourish during the Carboniferous and Permian only to become extinct at the end of the Permian some 139 million years later.All goniatites possessed an external shell, which is divided internally into chambers filled with gas giving it Buoyancy during the life of the animal. An open chamber at the front of the shell provided living space for the goniatitid animal, with access to open water through an aperture. The general morphology and habit of goniatites was probably similar to that of their later relatives the ammonites, being free swimming and possessing a head with two well developed eyes and arms (or tentacles). The typical goniatitid has a suture with smooth saddles and lobes, which gives the name "goniatitic" to this particular suture pattern. In some the sutures has a distinctive "zigzag" pattern Not all goniatitid ammonoides have goniatitic sutures. In some the sutures are ceratitic, in others, even ammonitic. Nor are goniatitic sutures limited to the Goniatidia. The sutures of nautiloids are by comparison somewhat simpler, being either straight or slightly curved, whereas later ammonoids showed suture patterns of increasing complexity. One explanation for this increasing extravagancy in suture pattern is that it leads to a higher strength of the shell. ***SPECIAL NOTE*** - The "flashy" bit in the first photo is NOT Ammolite or some such mineral - It is merely a reflection from my flash on the camera. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Subclass: †Ammonoidea Order: †Goniatitida
  9. goniatite ammonoid UL b1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Goniatite Ammonoid Unknown location; probably Morocco, possibly Timor Middle Devonian – Late Permian (390–251.4 Million Years Ago) This was a gift. I know the dealer who SOLD it, I know where HE got it. This "original" dealer sells ammonoids from all over, but polished ones are either Morocco or Timor. Because the exact location is unknown, I cannot supply a more definitive age for this fossil. Goniatids, informally Goniatites, are ammonoid cephalopods that form the Order Goniatiida, derived from the more primitive Anarcestida during the Middle Devonian some 390 million years ago. Goniatites (goniatitida) survived the Late Devonian extinction to flourish during the Carboniferous and Permian only to become extinct at the end of the Permian some 139 million years later.All goniatites possessed an external shell, which is divided internally into chambers filled with gas giving it Buoyancy during the life of the animal. An open chamber at the front of the shell provided living space for the goniatitid animal, with access to open water through an aperture. The general morphology and habit of goniatites was probably similar to that of their later relatives the ammonites, being free swimming and possessing a head with two well developed eyes and arms (or tentacles). The typical goniatitid has a suture with smooth saddles and lobes, which gives the name "goniatitic" to this particular suture pattern. In some the sutures has a distinctive "zigzag" pattern Not all goniatitid ammonoides have goniatitic sutures. In some the sutures are ceratitic, in others, even ammonitic. Nor are goniatitic sutures limited to the Goniatidia. The sutures of nautiloids are by comparison somewhat simpler, being either straight or slightly curved, whereas later ammonoids showed suture patterns of increasing complexity. One explanation for this increasing extravagancy in suture pattern is that it leads to a higher strength of the shell. ***SPECIAL NOTE*** - The "flashy" bit in the first photo is NOT Ammolite or some such mineral - It is merely a reflection from my flash on the camera. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Subclass: †Ammonoidea Order: †Goniatitida
  10. goniatite ammonoid UL a1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Goniatite Ammonoid Unknown location; probably Morocco, possibly Timor Middle Devonian – Late Permian (390–251.4 Million Years Ago) This was a gift. I know the dealer who SOLD it, I know where HE got it. This dealer sells ammonoids from all over, but polished ones are either Morocco or Timor. Because the exact location is unknown, I cannot supply a more definitive age for this fossil. Goniatids, informally Goniatites, are ammonoid cephalopods that form the Order Goniatiida, derived from the more primitive Anarcestida during the Middle Devonian some 390 million years ago. Goniatites (goniatitida) survived the Late Devonian extinction to flourish during the Carboniferous and Permian only to become extinct at the end of the Permian some 139 million years later.All goniatites possessed an external shell, which is divided internally into chambers filled with gas giving it Buoyancy during the life of the animal. An open chamber at the front of the shell provided living space for the goniatitid animal, with access to open water through an aperture. The general morphology and habit of goniatites was probably similar to that of their later relatives the ammonites, being free swimming and possessing a head with two well developed eyes and arms (or tentacles). The typical goniatitid has a suture with smooth saddles and lobes, which gives the name "goniatitic" to this particular suture pattern. In some the sutures has a distinctive "zigzag" pattern Not all goniatitid ammonoides have goniatitic sutures. In some the sutures are ceratitic, in others, even ammonitic. Nor are goniatitic sutures limited to the Goniatidia. The sutures of nautiloids are by comparison somewhat simpler, being either straight or slightly curved, whereas later ammonoids showed suture patterns of increasing complexity. One explanation for this increasing extravagancy in suture pattern is that it leads to a higher strength of the shell. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Subclass: †Ammonoidea Order: †Goniatitida
  11. goniatite ammonoid UL a1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Goniatite Ammonoid Unknown location; probably Morocco, possibly Timor Middle Devonian – Late Permian (390–251.4 Million Years Ago) This was a gift. I know the dealer who SOLD it, I know where HE got it. This dealer sells ammonoids from all over, but polished ones are either Morocco or Timor. Because the exact location is unknown, I cannot supply a more definitive age for this fossil. Goniatids, informally Goniatites, are ammonoid cephalopods that form the Order Goniatiida, derived from the more primitive Anarcestida during the Middle Devonian some 390 million years ago. Goniatites (goniatitida) survived the Late Devonian extinction to flourish during the Carboniferous and Permian only to become extinct at the end of the Permian some 139 million years later.All goniatites possessed an external shell, which is divided internally into chambers filled with gas giving it Buoyancy during the life of the animal. An open chamber at the front of the shell provided living space for the goniatitid animal, with access to open water through an aperture. The general morphology and habit of goniatites was probably similar to that of their later relatives the ammonites, being free swimming and possessing a head with two well developed eyes and arms (or tentacles). The typical goniatitid has a suture with smooth saddles and lobes, which gives the name "goniatitic" to this particular suture pattern. In some the sutures has a distinctive "zigzag" pattern Not all goniatitid ammonoides have goniatitic sutures. In some the sutures are ceratitic, in others, even ammonitic. Nor are goniatitic sutures limited to the Goniatidia. The sutures of nautiloids are by comparison somewhat simpler, being either straight or slightly curved, whereas later ammonoids showed suture patterns of increasing complexity. One explanation for this increasing extravagancy in suture pattern is that it leads to a higher strength of the shell. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Subclass: †Ammonoidea Order: †Goniatitida
  12. goniatite ammonoid UL a1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Goniatite Ammonoid Unknown location; probably Morocco, possibly Timor Middle Devonian – Late Permian (390–251.4 Million Years Ago) This was a gift. I know the dealer who SOLD it, I know where HE got it. This dealer sells ammonoids from all over, but polished ones are either Morocco or Timor. Because the exact location is unknown, I cannot supply a more definitive age for this fossil. Goniatids, informally Goniatites, are ammonoid cephalopods that form the Order Goniatiida, derived from the more primitive Anarcestida during the Middle Devonian some 390 million years ago. Goniatites (goniatitida) survived the Late Devonian extinction to flourish during the Carboniferous and Permian only to become extinct at the end of the Permian some 139 million years later.All goniatites possessed an external shell, which is divided internally into chambers filled with gas giving it Buoyancy during the life of the animal. An open chamber at the front of the shell provided living space for the goniatitid animal, with access to open water through an aperture. The general morphology and habit of goniatites was probably similar to that of their later relatives the ammonites, being free swimming and possessing a head with two well developed eyes and arms (or tentacles). The typical goniatitid has a suture with smooth saddles and lobes, which gives the name "goniatitic" to this particular suture pattern. In some the sutures has a distinctive "zigzag" pattern Not all goniatitid ammonoides have goniatitic sutures. In some the sutures are ceratitic, in others, even ammonitic. Nor are goniatitic sutures limited to the Goniatidia. The sutures of nautiloids are by comparison somewhat simpler, being either straight or slightly curved, whereas later ammonoids showed suture patterns of increasing complexity. One explanation for this increasing extravagancy in suture pattern is that it leads to a higher strength of the shell. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Subclass: †Ammonoidea Order: †Goniatitida
  13. goniatite ammonoid UL a1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Goniatite Ammonoid Unknown location; probably Morocco, possibly Timor Middle Devonian – Late Permian (390–251.4 Million Years Ago) This was a gift. I know the dealer who SOLD it, I know where HE got it. This dealer sells ammonoids from all over, but polished ones are either Morocco or Timor. Because the exact location is unknown, I cannot supply a more definitive age for this fossil. Goniatids, informally Goniatites, are ammonoid cephalopods that form the Order Goniatiida, derived from the more primitive Anarcestida during the Middle Devonian some 390 million years ago. Goniatites (goniatitida) survived the Late Devonian extinction to flourish during the Carboniferous and Permian only to become extinct at the end of the Permian some 139 million years later.All goniatites possessed an external shell, which is divided internally into chambers filled with gas giving it Buoyancy during the life of the animal. An open chamber at the front of the shell provided living space for the goniatitid animal, with access to open water through an aperture. The general morphology and habit of goniatites was probably similar to that of their later relatives the ammonites, being free swimming and possessing a head with two well developed eyes and arms (or tentacles). The typical goniatitid has a suture with smooth saddles and lobes, which gives the name "goniatitic" to this particular suture pattern. In some the sutures has a distinctive "zigzag" pattern Not all goniatitid ammonoides have goniatitic sutures. In some the sutures are ceratitic, in others, even ammonitic. Nor are goniatitic sutures limited to the Goniatidia. The sutures of nautiloids are by comparison somewhat simpler, being either straight or slightly curved, whereas later ammonoids showed suture patterns of increasing complexity. One explanation for this increasing extravagancy in suture pattern is that it leads to a higher strength of the shell. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Subclass: †Ammonoidea Order: †Goniatitida
  14. goniatite ammonoid UL a1.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Goniatite Ammonoid Unknown location; probably Morocco, possibly Timor Middle Devonian – Late Permian (390–251.4 Million Years Ago) This was a gift. I know the dealer who SOLD it, I know where HE got it. This dealer sells ammonoids from all over, but polished ones are either Morocco or Timor. Because the exact location is unknown, I cannot supply a more definitive age for this fossil. Goniatids, informally Goniatites, are ammonoid cephalopods that form the Order Goniatiida, derived from the more primitive Anarcestida during the Middle Devonian some 390 million years ago. Goniatites (goniatitida) survived the Late Devonian extinction to flourish during the Carboniferous and Permian only to become extinct at the end of the Permian some 139 million years later.All goniatites possessed an external shell, which is divided internally into chambers filled with gas giving it Buoyancy during the life of the animal. An open chamber at the front of the shell provided living space for the goniatitid animal, with access to open water through an aperture. The general morphology and habit of goniatites was probably similar to that of their later relatives the ammonites, being free swimming and possessing a head with two well developed eyes and arms (or tentacles). The typical goniatitid has a suture with smooth saddles and lobes, which gives the name "goniatitic" to this particular suture pattern. In some the sutures has a distinctive "zigzag" pattern Not all goniatitid ammonoides have goniatitic sutures. In some the sutures are ceratitic, in others, even ammonitic. Nor are goniatitic sutures limited to the Goniatidia. The sutures of nautiloids are by comparison somewhat simpler, being either straight or slightly curved, whereas later ammonoids showed suture patterns of increasing complexity. One explanation for this increasing extravagancy in suture pattern is that it leads to a higher strength of the shell. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Cephalopoda Subclass: †Ammonoidea Order: †Goniatitida
  15. What is this interesting thing?

    I am a complete newbie at this. This was found with a batch of rocks that I bought at an estate sale in Nevada, USA. I have no idea where it may have been originally found. We took more photos but I could only attach these two. The tape measure is showing centimeters.
  16. Double Mystery Brachiopod

    Today I received a special surprise at work; our magazine editor found this fossil in her yard! A nice brachiopod, it seems! Here are the two mysteries: 1. WHAT TYPE of brachiopod? (I'd be happy with FAMILY). 2. FROM WHERE? I was excited that she had MARINE FOSSILS on her land... but she said this was in a bunch of rock THEY BOUGHT for landscaping purposes. ANY ideas? I have seen nodules like this from out west - Any opinions or guesses welcome!
  17. Large limb bone portion ID

    About 20 years ago I bought this bone for $20 at a garage sale in the suburbs of Chicago. The woman did not know where her father had found it. Around that same time I showed it to Paleontologist Paul Sereno who was talking at a nearby library and he stated he believes it to be reptile. Just looking to see what other members think. @Troodon
  18. Multiple sea specimens

    I love this piece. Every time I look at it i see something new. Although, I have no idea what I'm looking at. This was left behind by previous tenants so its exact location is a mystery. I live in Arizona and have found many shells just not like these. I'm excited to learn more about my fossils.
  19. What fish is this?

    We are driving from California to Utah on US Highway 50 ("The Second-Loneliest Road in America") to dig for trilobites in a couple of locations. We stopped for lunch today in the remote mining town of Austin, Nevada, and after lunch went over to Nevada Trading Post to look around. They had lots of turquoise jewelry and also a few fossils. Among them was this one. The owner recently purchased the store and doesn't know anything about it. It was priced at $280, which was out of my budget, but I told her I knew just the place to see if we can identify it. I said we don't do appraisals but she would be happy with any info we can provide. I took a quick look with a loupe and it isn't obvious there has been any restoration or painting on it, but I will leave it to the experts to say for sure. And if anyone is driving through Austin, be sure to stop in and say hi to Julie, she was a very nice lady. The sign out front might still say Jim's Trading Post, she is still in the process of changing the name. It's right near the Toiyabe Cafe (great cheeseburger!) on the east side of town.
  20. Ammonite ID

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