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Found 111 results

  1. Hi all! The Aguja Formation matrix that I ordered from PaleoTex arrived on June 12th, but I decided to wait until school ended before I began the process of searching it. Well, school ended yesterday so I have begun the process today! My 5 pounds of matrix are currently soaking in a solution of baking soda and water (because the matrix arrived "unwashed"), but while stirring up the squishy contents with my hand, I found the following 3 items that I'd like your input on. Item #1: Could this be a ceratopsian spitter tooth??? @Troodon More to follow...
  2. Upper Cretaceous oddity

    While out in the Puerco, I smacked open a concretion to find an unfamiliar pattern. Any thoughts or ideas are greatly appreciated. The specimen is from the Upper Cretaceous (Turonian) Carlile Shale. It is layered and each layer has this pattern. I currently do not have a measurement but will do so. Thanks for taking a look.
  3. Okay, this may be just wishful thinking, but a girl can hope, right? For your viewing pleasure is an Upper Cretaceous coprolite from the North Sulphur River in Texas, Ozan Formation, Talyor Shale. This little beauty has some unusual fish remains. Any chance this is a caudal fin from a coelacanth? The bones are pretty substantial compared to other fish bones I've seen in coprolites from the area. It does contain scales that are good sized and pretty transparent, with kind of a fingerprint pattern. Obviously, they may not be from the same prey item. Can anyone tell me if these are indeed coelacant bones? If so, do they look like those from a caudal fin? Other thoughts? @Fossildude19 @sharkdoctor @Carl Image 1:
  4. Triceratops Collar Piece?

    I have seen this item for sale and if genuine it would be a cool thing to add to the collection. But can it be identified as a triceratops collar piece with any certainty? The description says [it is a Triceratops collar fragment from the Hell Creek Formation in Montana, USA].
  5. burrow.jpg

    From the album Mancos Shale - Grand Junction, CO

    Marine burrow. Found this down in the Mancos shale, loose. Possibly from the overlying Mesaverde formation. I have seen many burrows in the Mesaverde sandstone.
  6. Atco Peculiarity

    In June of 2018, Kieth Minor alerted me to a new apartment complex that was being developed in the middle Atco Formation of North Texas. They were cutting a huge cubic area of rock out of a hillside, piling up multiple large mounds of Atco which seemed to be begging for someone to carefully search out their freshly exposed contents. On the 15th of that month we got to the site, Kieth asked permission of the site foreman for us to carefully take a look around during the crew's work hours, and we made our way into the pit. We were on a mission to save as many ammonites as we could. FIG 1: First impressions.
  7. Mosasaur or Plesiosaur?

    I found a tooth in Bladen County, NC at a site on the Cape Fear River near Elizabethtown. The site is Upper Cretaceous, and is Upper Campanian in age. It's in the Black Creek Group. I know that the tooth isn't in the best of shape, but hopefully is identifiable. All the Mosasaur teeth I had collected there before are a black color. I noticed this tooth is also curved from side to side. I don't know if it's a Plesiosaur or Mosasaur tooth. Both have been found at this site, but the Plesiosaur is far less common.
  8. Found Some Bone Today

    Hey folks, Here is a bone I found today. The photo shows it in situ as it was slowly sliding down a slight grade. The area where it was found does not permit collection by citizens so it remains where it was found. The area where it was found is along the ancient shoreline of the Western Interior Seaway on the west bank where the shoreline ebbed and flowed to engulf the immediate area, only to later be dry land at essentially the same level of strata. In the same immediate area where this was found, also today, I located fossilized stromatalite (a water bacteria), and fossilized wood. Within just a dozen miles of the area where I found the bone there have been collections of bone specimens ranging from mosasaurs to plateosaurid-type dinosaurs. Hopefully someone has an idea about this bone to enlighten someone who really doesn't know anything about it, namely, me. Location where it was found is in the San Juan Basin of San Juan County, New Mexico, Kirtland Formation, Upper Cretaceous period.
  9. Jay Dubya's Petrified Wood

    Friends, I seem to collect lots of petrified wood in my nearly-every-weekend outings into the oil patch in the county where I live. Much of what is found are small little bits and pieces and a whole lot of it is really pretty. Some I will try to identify and those may earn their own topic entry, however, others are just nice little pieces that I cut up on my saw and will post the photographs here for y'all to look at. They are just too pretty to not share, you know? All those entered under this topic will be found near my home unless otherwise notated. Some of the petrified wood will have been found by a buddy of mine whose rock I cut up for him from time to time, and those will also be notated here. If no one minds, I probably won't put a scale on the specimens since all of them will be no longer than 4 1/2" on their longest side since that is as wide as my little rock saw can handle. As usual, feel free to comment. Some of this stuff might really challenge your ability to readily recognize what is or what isn't petrified wood.
  10. Fossilized Conifer, anyone?

    Some petrified wood found in northwestern New Mexico, San Juan Basin, Upper Cretaceous, Kirtland Formation a couple of weeks ago. The cut slabs are from a log about 6-inches in diameter and my best guess is conifer only because most everything else in that area turns out to be conifer, specifically, Cupressinoxylon sp. Any other opinion about species would be welcome. There are several nice agate bands running through the length of the log and are clearly visible here. The first slab is dry and the second is wet.
  11. NM Conifer from Upper Cretaceous

    A couple of photos showing an unknown fossilized conifer tree located this past November (2019) in northwestern New Mexico, Kirtland Formation, Upper Cretaceous. Sorry for no scale but the specimen is about 13 inches (33 centimeters) long. Also included is a photo of my dig where I removed this specimen as a piece of something larger. You will see this specimen limb is quite compressed, something common for petrified wood found in that area of New Mexico. I have tentatively identified the specimen as a conifer using a DinoLite (see photo). I am seeking help with additional information or identification beyond it being simply "conifer".
  12. I posted this image in the prep thread and I was widely stated to be an Ichnofossil of infilled burrows. I really don't want to be "that guy" that questions expert opinions, but I'm curious; the burrow seems to have attached branches and areas of tiny "grassy" masses adjacent to it. Could they be crinoid segments/branches and pinnules? I have seen photos of chondrites that have the same kind of appearance. I include 3 of my photos, including one through the eyepiece of my scope, and one internet photo of crinoid pinnules. Thanks. I'll happily accept your opinions, go away now, and not be a pest any further.
  13. Gotta start somewhere

    Hi. Total newbie here. But interested in what I see as I have been lurking this site for 5 years or so. I have acquired some basic prep tools and want to practice a bit of matrix removal to develop a feel for the rock and tools before I start anything important (to me at least). I picked up a few rocks yesterday from the Nanaimo Formations, upper Cretaceous, Campanian the map says. It would be handy to know what I am looking at so I could Google some images and know what to look for as I uncover things. If anyone would care to identify a few things, I would be grateful.
  14. Sponge? Coral? None of the above?

    Found in northwestern New Mexico in an Upper Cretaceous area. Specimen was wetted with water to bring out detail.
  15. New Tyrannosauroid from China

    A new Tyrannosauroid is described in this paper, unfortunately its paywalled. I show it not just because its new but once thought to be aTarbosaurus sp, see photos below. So until its studied, reviewed and published identifications are just preliminary. So let me welcome Jinbeisaurus wangi the first theropod dinosaur so far found in Shanxi Province, Huiquanpu Formation Scale: 1 meter https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195667119301909 Some poor screenshots of images Much better Q photos thanks to Jim Kirkland
  16. Is this a fossil?

    I found this shell on the rock ledge of Little Tribune Bay on Hornby Island on Sept 12,2019. I’m a total amateur fossil hunter but after some research, I wonder if it’s a glycymerdid. Of course since I know absolutely nothing about fossils except what I can find on the web that might match my find, i’m turning to the Forum for your expertise. I hope someone can tell me if this is even a fossil and if so, what it is. Thanks, Cricket.
  17. Hornby Island fossil ID help

    Part 2, 2nd photo of bivalve found on Fossil Beach, Hornby Island, Sept 13, 2019
  18. Hornby Island fossil ID help

    Found on Hornby Island, Fossil Beach, September 13, 2019. Need help identifying this fossil. Looks like a bivalve to me but i am still pretty new to fossil identification. I will have to post a ‘part 2’ to upload the second photo.
  19. Hi, I would like to identify this foram, it was collected in the upper cretaceous (campanian) mudstones
  20. Post Oak Creek Shark Tooth Fossils

    After fossils hunting in the North Sulphur River, I decided to go and check out Post Oak Creek in Sherman, Texas. I found 83 teeth there in one day, some of which I am interested in getting identified. These teeth are from the Upper Cretaceous period.
  21. I went fossil hunting at the North Sulphur River in Ladonia, Texas, today and found two relatively small vertebrae and an interesting bone shard that I would love to have identified. As far as I know, the fossils from around this area are typically from the Upper Cretaceous period, though fossils from different time periods have been found here. If you would please help me identify these fossils, that would be great!
  22. I went fossil hunting at the North Sulphur River in Ladonia, Texas, today and found two relatively small vertebrae and an interesting bone shard that I would love to have identified. As far as I know, the fossils from around this area are typically from the Upper Cretaceous period, though fossils from different time periods have been found here. If you would please help me identify these fossils, that would be great!
  23. I found this Phlycticrioceras trinodosum heteromorph specimen in June of 2018 whilst hunting the middle/upper Coniacian Atco formation. It is the largest fragment of this species that I am aware of, having a whorl height of 51 mm as opposed to 47 mm of the largest fragment I've seen published. This genus is a bigger, rarer, and (mostly) younger cousin of Allocrioceras. I sent pictures of it to Keith Minor and he pointed out that there was also an echinoid sticking out of the specimen, something which I had totally missed! With much of the echinoid still stuck in the living chamber it is hard to get a definitive ID. But because it has such a shallow anterior ambulacra, which gives the anterior end a more smooth rather than definitive heart shape, he ruled out both Mecaster texanus and batensis. He suggested Micraster since the site has a strong European component in both the bivalve and ammonite faunas, and because the periproct side has the right shape. From finding other, although not as well preserved specimens that show similar morphology he appears to be right. I have yet to confirm this ID with Andrew Smith, but either way I think the piece is worth showing. And reading this thread got me thinking about how this could have happened and what effect it could have had on the echinoid's preservation. My thought is that because irregular echinoids lived and today still live most of their lives burrowing in the sediment it is unlikely that it would have crawled into the living chamber, but instead that it was blown into it post-mortem via currents that had dredged it out of the sediment. I already know that this site was a high energy environment from my other finds here so this seems the most likely possibility to me. But because of the fact there is still at least one spine still attached to the specimen it could not have been swept up from the sediment too long after death or all of its hairlike spines would have blown away. I do, however, find it interesting that it is positioned anterior first with its posterior towards the aperture, the position I would expect to see it in if it had indeed crawled into the shell. The specimen is also the best preserved echinoid from this site so far. Despite the ammonites being generally well preserved and not too crushed, most of the echinoids that I have from the site are terribly crushed, flakey, and often infested with rotting pyrite. I think being encapsulated in the chamber very much reduced those effects. Even though the ammonite and the echinoid are a bit crushed, the echinoid would have probably been worse off otherwise. The heteromorph fragment length is 70 mm and the whorl breadth, being a bit crushed, is 13 mm. I would think that this specimen, with its open planispiral coiling, would would have been at least over a foot in diameter when complete. It is the robust (female) morph of the species with a rib index of 5½. For comparison in Fig. 1 I pictured it with my most complete P. trinodosum specimen. From the part of the echinoid that is exposed I can measure 25 mm in length, 25 in width, and a thickness of 8 mm. I have also found abundant yet scattered fish remains at the site, so perhaps one day an ammonite-fish will come my way. But until then, anyone else got ammonite-echinoids to show? Fig. 1. Fig. 2.
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