Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'upper cretaceous'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 90 results

  1. Post Oak Creek Shark Tooth Fossils

    After fossils hunting in the North Sulphur River, I decided to go and check out Post Oak Creek in Sherman, Texas. I found 83 teeth there in one day, some of which I am interested in getting identified. These teeth are from the Upper Cretaceous period.
  2. I went fossil hunting at the North Sulphur River in Ladonia, Texas, today and found two relatively small vertebrae and an interesting bone shard that I would love to have identified. As far as I know, the fossils from around this area are typically from the Upper Cretaceous period, though fossils from different time periods have been found here. If you would please help me identify these fossils, that would be great!
  3. I went fossil hunting at the North Sulphur River in Ladonia, Texas, today and found two relatively small vertebrae and an interesting bone shard that I would love to have identified. As far as I know, the fossils from around this area are typically from the Upper Cretaceous period, though fossils from different time periods have been found here. If you would please help me identify these fossils, that would be great!
  4. I found this Phlycticrioceras trinodosum heteromorph specimen in June of 2018 whilst hunting the middle/upper Coniacian Atco formation. It is the largest fragment of this species that I am aware of, having a whorl height of 51 mm as opposed to 47 mm of the largest fragment I've seen published. This genus is a bigger, rarer, and (mostly) younger cousin of Allocrioceras. I sent pictures of it to Keith Minor and he pointed out that there was also an echinoid sticking out of the specimen, something which I had totally missed! With much of the echinoid still stuck in the living chamber it is hard to get a definitive ID. But because it has such a shallow anterior ambulacra, which gives the anterior end a more smooth rather than definitive heart shape, he ruled out both Mecaster texanus and batensis. He suggested Micraster since the site has a strong European component in both the bivalve and ammonite faunas, and because the periproct side has the right shape. From finding other, although not as well preserved specimens that show similar morphology he appears to be right. I have yet to confirm this ID with Andrew Smith, but either way I think the piece is worth showing. And reading this thread got me thinking about how this could have happened and what effect it could have had on the echinoid's preservation. My thought is that because irregular echinoids lived and today still live most of their lives burrowing in the sediment it is unlikely that it would have crawled into the living chamber, but instead that it was blown into it post-mortem via currents that had dredged it out of the sediment. I already know that this site was a high energy environment from my other finds here so this seems the most likely possibility to me. But because of the fact there is still at least one spine still attached to the specimen it could not have been swept up from the sediment too long after death or all of its hairlike spines would have blown away. I do, however, find it interesting that it is positioned anterior first with its posterior towards the aperture, the position I would expect to see it in if it had indeed crawled into the shell. The specimen is also the best preserved echinoid from this site so far. Despite the ammonites being generally well preserved and not too crushed, most of the echinoids that I have from the site are terribly crushed, flakey, and often infested with rotting pyrite. I think being encapsulated in the chamber very much reduced those effects. Even though the ammonite and the echinoid are a bit crushed, the echinoid would have probably been worse off otherwise. The heteromorph fragment length is 70 mm and the whorl breadth, being a bit crushed, is 13 mm. I would think that this specimen, with its open planispiral coiling, would would have been at least over a foot in diameter when complete. It is the robust (female) morph of the species with a rib index of 5½. For comparison in Fig. 1 I pictured it with my most complete P. trinodosum specimen. From the part of the echinoid that is exposed I can measure 25 mm in length, 25 in width, and a thickness of 8 mm. I have also found abundant yet scattered fish remains at the site, so perhaps one day an ammonite-fish will come my way. But until then, anyone else got ammonite-echinoids to show? Fig. 1. Fig. 2.
  5. Hemiaster_batalleri_2.JPG

    From the album Campanian/Maastrichtian echinoids from SE Pyrenees

    Hemiaster (bolbaster) batalleri (Lambert, 1933)
  6. Hemiaster_batalleri_3.JPG

    From the album Campanian/Maastrichtian echinoids from SE Pyrenees

    Hemiaster (bolbaster) batalleri (Lambert, 1933)
  7. Hemiaster_batalleri_1.JPG

    From the album Campanian/Maastrichtian echinoids from SE Pyrenees

    Hemiaster (bolbaster) batalleri (Lambert, 1933)
  8. Scapanorhynchus puercoensis teeth

    Here are two teeth from a fairly recently (2011) described Scapanorhynchus species from the Upper Cretaceous Santonian in New Mexico. Scapanorhynchus puercoensis has a dentition similar to S. lewisii and was likely very similar. My son and I do classroom science presentations about fossils and our shark program features Scapanorhynchus. He used the lewisii as the basis for his illustration and now we can actually provide teeth that are a closer match to that than S. texanus likely was. This also allows him to draw S. texanus in a more Sand Tiger like form which we both think it was. I put quite a bit of research in our programs and we strive for accuracy so I am really digging these teeth !!!
  9. 'Moose' the mosasaur

    I had the opportunity and good fortune to participate in the excavation and preparation of a mosasaur this past year. The specimen was discovered by a new friend, Allison, in a small unnamed stream adjacent to family property in east-central Mississippi (? Prairie Bluff Fm, Upper Cretaceous, Late Maastrichtian).Allison found the first bones in early May and contacted me for help in identifying the bones through a mutual friend. I'm far from an expert, but was able to ID the bones (a radius and vertebra) as mosasaur. She was really excited, since the bones were her first vertebrate fossils other than a few Pleistocene horse teeth from the same creek, and promised to continue searching. On her next trip, Allison exposed part of a mosasaur jaw and sent pics to me while still in the creek. Long story - short version -- We (Allison, my grandson, Logan and I) began serious excavation in early June 2018 and continued collecting (several trips) and preparation through November. Dr. Lynn Harell, Paleontologist with the Alabama Geological Survey viewed photos of the specimen as I prepped them and helped to ID individual bones and confirmed the genus as Mosasaurus. Dr. Takehito Ikejiri, Alabama Museum of Natural History, worked with me to compare "Moose' (named by Allison) to many specimens in the archives of the Museum. Both were extremely helpful to me as we tried to confirm the ID and agreed that it should be labeled as Mosasaurus sp. until further study. George Phillips of the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science identified associated invertebrate specimens in hopes of confirming the geology of the site (still unconfirmed). 'Moose' was donated to the Dunn-Seiler Museum at Mississippi State University in December 2018. It will be studied as part of a graduate students research. Following are a large number of photos documenting the site, excavation, prepration, and bones of 'Moose'. Thanks for looking.
  10. Hell Creek crush plate?

    Fossil teeth found in the Hell Creek badlands of southeastern Montana! measures approx .42 inches long Amphibian? They are from uppermost Cretaceous age (Maastrichtian) deposits, in the Hell Creek Formation, Carter County, Montana. Any help identifying would be appreciated.
  11. Hoploscaphites Spedeni

    Originally the specimen was collected as a concretion from upper Pierre Shale Formation near the lowest level of the Fox Hills Formation. The collection location is Cedar Creek about seven miles south of Glendive, Montana. The Date collected was Oct. 12, 2018. Later, I removed most of the concretion/matrix with diamond blade and bits. Two of the hoploscaphites spedeni were badly crushed and fractured during fossilization and are missing half of shells. During prep, I miscalculated the depth of cutting blade, slightly damaging the middle scaphites.
  12. New Cretaceous Pterosaur from Southeastern France

    Just got this report of a new pterosaur (Mistralazhdarcho maggii) from the Upper Cretaceous of southeastern France The specimen was collected from the highly fossiliferous "Velaux-La Bastide Neuve" site (Bouches-du-Rhône region), a site known for diverse tetrapod remains. The remains described consist of a mandibular symphysis, a few vertebrae, and several limb bones (including 2 humeri, a radius, a pteroid, a metacarpal and a wing phalanx). The authors of the paper (see attached below) consider that due to incomplete ossification of the bones, the specimen might represent an immature individual. M. maggii helps to provide more insight into the Late Cretaceous European azhdarchid radiation. Romain Vullo, Géraldine Garcia, Pascal Godefroit, Aude Cincotta & Xavier Valentin (2018): Mistralazhdarcho Maggii, Gen. Et Sp. Nov., A New Azhdarchid Pterosaur from the Upper Cretaceous of Southeastern France, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, DOI: 10.1080/02724634.2018.1502670 Abstract: A series of pterosaur bones from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) of Velaux (Bouches-du-Rhône, southeastern France) is described. This material, including both cranial and postcranial elements found in close association and likely belonging to a single immature individual, is assigned to a new genus and species of azhdarchid pterosaur, Mistralazhdarcho maggii. This large-sized taxon (wingspan ca. 4.5 m in the holotype, possibly reaching 5–6 m in mature individuals) is characterized by a slightly downturned mandibular symphysis that shows a ‘V’-shaped cross-sectional profile and bears a well-developed, anteriorly located median eminence on its dorsal surface. The presence of a median eminence suggests that Mistralazhdarcho might be closely related to Alanqa from the Cenomanian of Morocco. The material described here represents the first partial skeleton of a pterosaur recovered from the Late Cretaceous deposits of western Europe, and the new taxon is one of the most completely known European azhdarchids. Mistralazhdarcho is intermediate in size between the medium-sized genus Eurazhdarcho and the giant-sized genus Hatzegopteryx, two azhdarchids from the Maastrichtian of Romania. The discovery of Mistralazhdarcho suggests the presence of a third azhdarchid size class in the continental ecosystems of the latest Cretaceous European archipelago. photography of the mandibular symphysis of M. maggii (measures 264mm). Here's the paper Vullo et al. 2018 Mistralazhdarcho.pdf Hope you liked this! -Christian
  13. Hello, just to show off some polished rudists from the Campanian St. Bartholomä-formation, Styria, Austria, collected from March 2018 to September 2018. https://franzbernhard.lima-city.de/Radiolitidae_04bis09_2018.html https://franzbernhard.lima-city.de/Hippurites_04bis09_2018.html https://franzbernhard.lima-city.de/Vaccinites_04bis09_2018.html Enjoy! Ah, and if someone is interested in "Punkt 25" : http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/blogs/entry/341-introduction-to-point-25/ http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/blogs/entry/342-point-25-what´s-behind-the-red-x/ http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/blogs/entry/343-point-25-surprise-at-home/ http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/blogs/entry/344-point-25-summing-up/ Franz Bernhard
  14. Sponge ?

    Hi, I've found today this tiny but interesting piece in a Campanian-Maastrichtian coral-rudist lithosome in SE Pyrenees. I've found there branched corals and bryozoans, but this one don't seem to me neither coral nor bryozoan. Could it be a sponge ? Thanks
  15. New tyrannosaurid from New Mexico

    Hey everyone There's this new bit of research from PeerJ, describing the partial remains of a new tyrannosaurid, Dynamoterror dynastes (pretty cool name, huh? ). The remains were from the Menefee Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of New Mexico, and are a valuable addition to our knowledge of North American tyrannosaurids. Partial cranial material of D. dynastes. McDonald et al. (2018). A new tyrannosaurid (Dinosauria: Theropoda) from the Upper Cretaceous Menefee Formation of New Mexico. Abstract: The giant tyrannosaurids were the apex predators of western North America and Asia during the close of the Cretaceous Period. Although many tyrannosaurid species are known from numerous skeletons representing multiple growth stages, the early evolution of Tyrannosauridae remains poorly known, with the well-known species temporally restricted to the middle Campanian-latest Maastrichtian (∼77–66 Ma). The recent discovery of a new tyrannosaurid, Lythronax argestes, from the Wahweap Formation of Utah provided new data on early Campanian (∼80 Ma) tyrannosaurids. Nevertheless, the early evolution of Tyrannosauridae is still largely unsampled. We report a new tyrannosaurid represented by an associated skeleton from the lower Campanian Allison Member of the Menefee Formation of New Mexico. Despite fragmentation of much of the axial and appendicular skeleton prior to discovery, the frontals, a metacarpal, and two pedal phalanges are well-preserved. The frontals exhibit an unambiguous autapomorphy and a second potential autapomorphy that distinguish this specimen from all other tyrannosaurids. Therefore, the specimen is made the holotype of the new genus and species Dynamoterror dynastes. A phylogenetic analysis places Dynamoterror dynastes in the tyrannosaurid subclade Tyrannosaurinae. Laser-scanning the frontals and creation of a composite 3-D digital model allows the frontal region of the skull roof of Dynamoterror to be reconstructed. You can download (for free!) the paper from this link: McDonald et al. 2018 Dynamoterror dynastes Hope you like this! -Christian
  16. Fossil identification from Comox valley

    Hi folks, I found these two fragments on the Puntledge River in Courtenay, British Columbia, Canada. These are from shale rock of Upper Cretaceous age. I think the one on the right might be a heteromorph ammonite and but I have no idea on the left one. Perhaps a thick shell? The pieces are about 5cm in length in the photo. I would really appreciate any ideas on what type of fossils these are. Cheers, Martin
  17. Armigatus brevissimus 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Armigatus brevissimus Fish Fossil Cenomanian of Hakel, Lebanon Upper Cretaceous Period (100.5-66 Million Years Ago) Armigatus is an extinct genus of clupeomorph fishes belonging to the order Ellimmichthyiformes. These fishes lived in the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian / Turonian, about 95-90 million years ago); their fossil remains have been found in the Middle East and North Africa. Armigatus has an osteoglossid-like tooth patch, a large foramen in the anterior ceratohyal and a series of subtriangular dorsal scutes, giving rise to their scientific name. The Latin genus name armigatus, means bearer of armor. Brevissimus signifies "shortest, smallest". Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Actinopterygii Subclass: Neopterygii Infraclass: Teleostei Superorder: Clupeomorpha Order: †Ellimmichthyiformes Genus: †Armigatus Species: †brevissimus
  18. Armigatus brevissimus 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Armigatus brevissimus Fish Fossil Cenomanian of Hakel, Lebanon Upper Cretaceous Period (100.5-66 Million Years Ago) Armigatus is an extinct genus of clupeomorph fishes belonging to the order Ellimmichthyiformes. These fishes lived in the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian / Turonian, about 95-90 million years ago); their fossil remains have been found in the Middle East and North Africa. Armigatus has an osteoglossid-like tooth patch, a large foramen in the anterior ceratohyal and a series of subtriangular dorsal scutes, giving rise to their scientific name. The Latin genus name armigatus, means bearer of armor. Brevissimus signifies "shortest, smallest". Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Actinopterygii Subclass: Neopterygii Infraclass: Teleostei Superorder: Clupeomorpha Order: †Ellimmichthyiformes Genus: †Armigatus Species: †brevissimus
  19. Armigatus brevissimus 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Armigatus brevissimus Fish Fossil Cenomanian of Hakel, Lebanon Upper Cretaceous Period (100.5-66 Million Years Ago) Armigatus is an extinct genus of clupeomorph fishes belonging to the order Ellimmichthyiformes. These fishes lived in the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian / Turonian, about 95-90 million years ago); their fossil remains have been found in the Middle East and North Africa. Armigatus has an osteoglossid-like tooth patch, a large foramen in the anterior ceratohyal and a series of subtriangular dorsal scutes, giving rise to their scientific name. The Latin genus name armigatus, means bearer of armor. Brevissimus signifies "shortest, smallest". Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Actinopterygii Subclass: Neopterygii Infraclass: Teleostei Superorder: Clupeomorpha Order: †Ellimmichthyiformes Genus: †Armigatus Species: †brevissimus
  20. Tiny Shark tooth ID please

    Hey! I found this little gem in the Selma Chalk in Starkville, MS. It's super small (1/8") and I have not encountered one like this. Any ideas?
  21. Cretaceous corals

    Hi everyone. Here are some specimens from an Upper Campanian - Lower Maastrichtian reef in the Catalan Pyrenees, which species’ diversity amazes me. In fact, they are collected in a 30 meter-radius point. I’ve only been able to approximate their genus (thanks to @Pachy, mostly) . So, I’ll strongly appreciate any help. Well, let’s start with the tiniest ones: Heliopora sp. (=Polytremacis), an Octocorallian: Columactinastrea sp.: Synastrea ? (Only my guess)
  22. Kummelonautilus?

    While on an adventure with @Pilobolus, exploring the Dakota Sandstone and underlying shales, I found something very exciting*... ...my first coiled Nautiloid! Coiled Nautiloid Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian) Paguate Member of the Dakota Formation Sandoval County, New Mexico Now, after a bit of research, I write here to lean on this Forum for assistance with identification. I find that this specimen sits well in the genus Kummelonautilus...what say you? Many thanks for your help, -P. *Bryan can attest to my yelling and jumping around. @FossilDAWG
  23. Upper Cretaceous Units in New Mexico

    From the album Upper Cretaceous New Mexico

    from New Mexico Bureau of Geology & Mineral Resources
×