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Found 103 results

  1. Found on a beach on Baltic Sea

    I found several interesting things while walking the beach last month just south of Visby, Gotland Island, Sweden. I wasn't even seriously looking, but these caught my eye. Three I can identify, but one has me scratching my head. It's been suggested it's a fossilized sea urchin, a bead from the Viking age, and perhaps a whorl used in spinning thread. All old, but I'd really like to know what exactly this little gem could be. It's about the size of a Cheerio, rock solid and smooth with a hole started on both sides.
  2. Puerto Rican sea biscuit?

    So i found this in san sebastian puerto rico and tried looking for info on it. All i found was that they were from madagascar. What's it doing all the way here in Puerto rico? How old is it? What period is it from?
  3. Hi guys, How are you? Just to let you know that I donated few fossils to 熊本市博物館 (Museum of Kumamoto city). The fossils I donated are a big nodule filled with danian ship worms from Amakusa Shimojima, a silurian piece of "coral" not yet identified from Yamatocho and my best (I won the FOTM contest with this beauty but its place belong to a museum as would say of famous archeologist ) Santonian sea urchin found in Amakusa. The Urchin should be part of the permanent exhibition as soon as they make some place for it. I will post pictures of the fossils I donated later after work. David
  4. Urchin spine

    Hi, several months ago i found a very tiny and rather flat urchin in a block which had two spines. I managed to disengage the urchin, but it is really too tiny for my camera. The spines are bigger and i wondered to what family of urchin they belong (maybe a cidarid ?) I also join the photos of the urchin that was with them (although i don't know if that would help). @Coco @caterpillar ? The smallest spine : The bigger :
  5. Please help ID further

    I am new to the fossil finding world. Please help me ID my find. A Facebook group says it Looks like it could be Temnocidaris (Stereocidaris) hudspethensis or ? Found among white rocks in a developing subdivision in Granbury, TX.
  6. help, what is this urchin, egg, geode?

  7. I decided on a whim to go fossil hunting yesterday. I took off on the 2 hr drive to get to my favorite area the North Sulphur River Texas. I jumped off in three creeks to see footprints everywhere. I decided to go try a creek I spotted a few years ago but never tried. It paid off. I found my first NSR echinoid after 4yrs of heavy hunting. Echinoids are quite rare at NSR. I also found a really cool Pachydiscus ammonite with an Inoceramid on it. I think I"ll try that creek again in the future.
  8. Echinoid Pliotoxaster.JPG

    From the album Central Texas Fossils

    Echinoids Pliotoxaster Sea Urchins Commonly called Heart Urchins Found in Bandera County
  9. Echinoid id

    Hello again, here is my most beautiful sand dollar fossil. We picked it up yesterday on a beach close to Ruwais, Abu Dhabi, UAE. I have found dozens of these, but rarely find one so flat. I would love to know the species name if possible.
  10. Sea urchin Holectypus?

    This was also found near Herznach in Switzerland and according to my lexicon, it could be a Jurassic Holectypus, am I correct? Greetings!
  11. Nucleolites Scutatus - Les Roches noires

    From the album Best of 2018 finds - a year in review

    Nucleolites Scutatus an echinoid from Les Roches noires (oxfordian)
  12. ferns and urchin

    Hi everybody, i recently made an exchange and so i received those ferns, all i know is that they come from Colorado, i have no other clue about them. I also received an unknown urchin and have no clue about it. Could you help me know a bit more about them ? The longest diagonal of that piece is a little less than 15 cm, the base is about 13 cm and it is about 11 cm hight. @Plantguy @paleoflor ?
  13. what is this?

    found this little thing it looked interesting it looks like it was once prickly? it also looks like it had a stem? is this a seed or perhaps a sponge?
  14. what is this?

    I found this in a load of gravel that came in for the drive it looked very different from the other stones and stuck out. At first I thought it was a squashed fossilized urchin but after looking at it more closely I just dont know...I have included as many photos as I could get of the outer part ... then I have some of the open side....my question is is this an urchin of some type or could it be an egg???. Mon Sep 17 00-46-22....is the bottom of the item in question.
  15. Dogger urchin

    Hi, in my exchange of that Week-end, i found that middle Jurassic urchin from the department of Orne, Normandy, France.
  16. This is part 2, site 2 of my Memorial day fossil hunting trip. You can see the site one report here: I chose to drive out to Denton Creek north of Ft. Worth. I had been there before, but had not gotten to explore the area. It was the takeout point from a kayaking trip I’d taken down the creek a few weeks before. It took me 30 minutes out to drive out there from the first location I hunted in Benbrook. If you pass the creek going north you can go up to the next exit and then loop back to the creek. There is a little rock and dirt path off the shoulder of the road that leads down to under the bridge where you can drive your vehicle. The hill down to under the bridge is kind of steep. My car was a bit on the low side for getting over the curb and then a steep embankment with rocks. I bottomed out once. I thought I might park my car in the shade under the bridge, but when I arrived there was another vehicle in the area. I thought I was the only person crazy enough to be out here in the heat. Nobody could pass if I parked under the bridge so I pulled through into a small clearing there. The grass and weeds were grown up pretty high in the clearing. I knew of a sizeable exposure on the creek that I wanted to try to get to on foot, but I didn’t know the terrain around the creek. I switched to my rubber boots for walking in the creek. I reapplied sunscreen and headed down the steep hill to the edge of the creek. I had to sit down and scoot myself over the edge and drop down to the rock ledge that ran along the creek. I inspected the exposure. Last time I was here I found a pretty decent Macraster obesus right by the spot I came in by. I didn’t see a single fossil. The creek was maybe 40 feet wide give or take. The water was less than 10 inches deep where I entered the creek. I don’t think the creek is ever a high energy creek. The rocks that are in this part of the creek are angular and jagged. The water in the creek is rather murky so you can’t see into the water. All of that makes it a difficult creek to walk in. Most of the creek in that spot is one level at bedrock with rocks scattered across much of the creek bottom. There is a narrow jagged rift in the bedrock that meanders along the creek bed. The water is deeper in the rift. I walked down into the creek and squatted down looking at some ammonite fragments in the creek. I saw two butterflies nearby. I tried to get a better picture from the side, but they flew away before I could do so. Sorry it is not a very clear picture. You can see the creek bed is kind of slimy looking. In some areas where the water was very low it looked foul and fetid. It had a green bubbly looking surface. I assessed the creek and decided to walked along the exposed rock ledge above the creek. As I walked up the creek there was a horrible stench of something dead. The further I went the worse it got. Finally I came upon a gar fish carcass on the rock ledge above the creek. It was close to one of the places where I had wanted to have a look around, but the odor was too strong and repulsive. It looked to be just over 3 feet long. I can’t imagine how it got there. It had to be a person who had drug it there. This section of the creek does not seem deep enough for such a large fish to swim in. Maybe it swam in the rift though. There were deeper sections of the creek where it could live, but not here. There were signs of racoons all over along with remnants of their meals. Evidently gar is not on the racoon menu, which was surprising to me since it seems raccoons will eat almost anything else. I looked at the thin, razor sharp gar teeth. It is kind of scary to think that type of critter was in this creek when I kayaked it. I was in and out of the water all the time. A bite from that thing would be nasty. Here is a pic of it. I walked back down the creek upon the rock ledge to a place where there weren’t too many jagged rocks in the creek and where the rift in the creek would be narrow enough for me to step across it. Since the water was flowing slowly the rocks were covered with algae and were very slippery. I got to the rift. There were rocks pilled up there. I place one foot on a large one sitting at an angle and it tottered underneath me. I made sure my foot wouldn’t slip and I balanced myself as I put my next foot on another rock. It tottered too. To slip and fall in this creek with all the jagged rocks would really hurt and might do considerable injury. At least when I slipped and fell in the NSR the riverbed was smooth, without any rocks. I took a few more steps on similar rocks and I was I on smooth riverbed again near the other bank. I began to inspect the exposure. I found these just sitting on the bank. A cute little impression of an ammonite and what appeared to be a fragment of a Pinna clam. I have yet to find a whole Pinna clam. I’d kind of like to find at least one whole one someday. The only other formation I have found them is in the Goodland. It is another of the Washita Group formations.
  17. During april i and a friend had the oportunity to spend a few days hunting in cretaceous of Normandy, hunting for echinoids. Day one : We drove from brittany through Le Havre to Saint Jouin de Bruneval and Antifer Cape. (3 hours and a half) We let the car on the beach parking lot and hiked south on the peeble shore looking for fossils in the boulders on the beach. The cliff is cenomanian with a bit of albian at the bottom. You have to look carefully on rocks surface for the familliar spherical shape. I found about 20 urchins but thats about it. No shark tooth, just a poorly preserved ammonite (mantelliceras) and a few rhynchonellas At some point we noticed tide was coming back faster than expected, most likely because of the wind pushing the water back. We had to quicken the pace, and made our way through the slippery covered with algae rocks. We finally managed our way back to the car and took the road to Fécamp where we had booked an hotel for the next 2 nights. some finds of the day : Crassiholaster subglobosus : Crassiholaster subglobosus : Cyclothyris difformis : See the all hunt gallery here http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/gallery/album/2849-haute-normandie-april-2018/ or on my flickr : https://flic.kr/s/aHsmiwWft6
  18. Micraster decipiens - 6

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Micraster decipiens : a cretaceous echinoid from Saint-Pierre en Port
  19. Micraster decipiens - 5

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Micraster decipiens : a cretaceous echinoid from Saint-Pierre en Port
  20. Micraster decipiens - 4

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Micraster decipiens : a cretaceous echinoid from Senneville sur Fécamp
  21. Micraster decipiens - 3

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Micraster decipiens : a cretaceous echinoid from Senneville sur Fécamp
  22. Micraster decipiens - 2

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Micraster decipiens : a cretaceous echinoid from Senneville sur Fécamp
  23. Micraster decipiens - 1

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Micraster decipiens : a cretaceous echinoid from Saint-Pierre en Port
  24. Echinoids : best from the april 2018 hunt

    From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Last hunt from Normandy cretaceous : best of echinoids
  25. From the album Haute normandie - April 2018

    Last hunt in cretaceous from Normandy : the whole loot
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