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Found 208 results

  1. Took me a little while to post this trip report, I'm always a busy person. This trip is from October 3rd, 2020 in Ellsworth County, Kansas at a reservoir. The predominant formation at the site I visited is Kiowa formation; which is known for marsh and delta environments in the early Cretaceous (Albian). I found some interesting things and I'll show below. Possibly some carbonized wood materials. Lignite or coal? It was flaky and would crumble if touched. It left some black powders on my hands after handling it. I found several large pieces of them together and partly encased in concretions. Putting them together would make them about a meter and half long. Piece #1: Piece #2: Backside of #2. Notice the clutches of concretions. ...continued on the next post.
  2. USA trilobite ID (Eldredgeops?)

    Hello from Moscow, Russia I bought this trilobite years ago on that auction site. I dont have clear info about it. Probably Eldredgeops rana from Sylvania?
  3. mystery rock

    I was cleaning up a shelf of agates in the garage and came upon this rock looks like it might be bone Have no idea where it is from- I collect in a lot of places 5 cm across I assume #5 is ventral and #4 is a dorsal view 1,2,3 are end on #1 is at the superior aspect of #4 #2 is inferior on #4 #3 is at 5 oclock on #4
  4. Yesterday (Saturday, Aug. 22nd), I went fossil hunting in Ellsworth County, Kansas again for elusive Dakota Sandstone leaves and unfortunately it's mostly a bust, just like the previous trip. Despite that, I enjoyed the scenery and found some odd rocks and few fossils from new sites. A new site produced a few small plates containing woody and plant material fragments. I decided not to keep them. Closer views... Remember that interesting sandstone from the previous trip? I regretted for not taking it home so I took another opportunity and revisited the old site to get that rock! The back of this rock is quite smooth and flat, I think it would be great to have it hang up on the wall, but I'm actually not sure how I will display it. Looking at it is like reading a 3D map! It's the only object I brought home from this trip. It's peaceful out there and the views of the Smoky Hills never gets old. ...continued on the next post.
  5. Found this need help please

    Found this in my neighborhood, I live in Dallas Texas USA. As far as geological history when I research the area it mentions most fossils found in Dallas Texas from the cretaceous period. It is small and looks like a piece of something but have no idea so now I’m here... any information would be helpful thanks. Length wise it’s 7.5 cm, width is 5.5 cm, and height is about 3 cm and the other is slanted so thing less than half of one cm.
  6. Squalicorax sp.

    Recently I purchased these two Squalicorax sp. tooths from an auction website and both are currently on the way. I have a few questions about identification since I know very little about shark tooths and also please correct any misidentifications. Seller A sold me this tooth and it was listed as Squalicorax hartwelli. It is collected from Niobrara formation in western Kansas. Is Squalicorax hartwelli considered a variation of Squalicorax falcatus? Do you agree with seller A's identification above? Seller B sold me this tooth and it was listed as Squalicorax kaupi. It is collected from Lincoln Limestone member of Greenhorn Limestone formation. I suspect this tooth is misidentified and it should be Squalicorax falcatus, a paleobucket taxa for Squalicorax sp. variations. I thought Squalicorax kaupi is found from Santonian to Maastrichtian and Lincoln Limestone member is Cenomanian. I spent quite a bit looking up on here and Ocean of Kansas website comparing Squalicorax sp. tooths before posting! Although I am more confident in some of the members' identification skills than I am with mine. Regardless of identifications (or misidentifications), I am happy with both and is excited to have them arrive soon!
  7. Liesegang rings?

    At first I thought it might be the cross-section of petrified trunk but upon a closer inspection, I doubt it's petrified woods. It is not silicified. I wonder if it's a concretion or Liesegang rings? I don't think I have seen something like this in person before. I couldn't get it extracted because it's embedded in the bedrock.
  8. Burrow?

    I'm wondering if it's a fossilized burrow or some form of ichnofossil. Notice the depression from the opposite side of the burrow-like projection. Dakota Sandstone formation and Cenomanian in age.
  9. Petrified woods?

    I'm wondering if it's really the petrified woods. It's found in ironstone concretions from Dakota Sandstone (Cenomanian), and it strikes me as 'woody'. I'm interested in what others think. From different trip and different site few months ago, but same formation and age.
  10. Finding the fossilized leaves from Dakota formation (also known as Dakota Sandstone) has been one of my goals for a long time. Today I headed to Ellsworth County, Kansas, where the Dakota Sandstone are located and hunt for the fossilized leaves. Unfortunately it's mostly a bust, but I did find a couple possible wood fossils and a few interesting rocks. I didn't take anything home this time except some pictures and memories. Notice the trees following along the small stream. Interesting sandstone! Interesting ironstone concretion! ...Continued on the next post.
  11. Concretionary?

    From my previous trip to Ellsworth County, Kansas and it's located in Dakota formation, Cenomanian. It appeared as almost like vertebrae but I'm sure it's not verts. Is it by chance some form of ichnofossil? @jpc thinks it's concretionary. No disrespect to him, he's the only one who offered his opinion and I would like to know if anyone else have a different opinion.
  12. Tree limb? Bamboo? Reed?

    Like what title said: is it a tree limb, bamboo, reed, or is it even something geological? Dakota formation, also known as Dakota Sandstone. Dakota formation is known to produce variety of flora fossils, such as leaves and seeds. The patterns on these fossils strike me as 'flora-ish'; like these that seem be nodes and also 'bark-like' and fibrous textures. ...Continued on the next post.
  13. Today I had a good time with fossil hunting at the Dakota formation (early Cenomanian) sites and Greenhorn formation (Cenomanian-early Turonian) sites in Ellsworth county, Kansas. Typical view of the local countryside, but still beautiful! I keep finding these weird vertebrae-like rocks, clustered in this particular site and not other sites. I suspect it's not vertebrae but I still can't figure this out yet. These mysterious vertebrae-like rocks...reminds me of shark centrum and crinoid stems but I don't think it's them. This site is Dakota formation. I took these home just in case it is identified as fossils later. I think it's fossil vegetation of some sort. Maybe reed or horsetail? I found these jumbled at different locations but put it together and it fitted like a puzzle. I took it home and will be prepped. This is from Dakota formation. Inoceramus from Greenhorn formation. One of the best specimen of this genus I have found so far! Took this one home. Another Inoceramus, pretty good specimen! I also took this one home. Tiny fossil in the center. Greenhorn formation again. This tiny fossil, image enlarged and the ridges/grooves are visible. No idea what it was. I took this one home and will be put under the microscope for identification efforts. The storm was brewing at the distance as the cold front is heading south. It was lightning and I was at near the top of hill, the road would be impassable if wet, so it was time for me to go home! I will be posting some of those fossils on the Fossils ID section soon after it is cleaned up. Cheers!
  14. Domatoceras Perhaps?

    So most of what I find is Metacoceras or Pseudorthoceras, two very common cephalopods locally. I've found a few Solenochilus, but they are different enough that I know what I found right away. This specimen was discovered as a body chamber. I thought Metacoceras, because, why not? Anything of this shape usually is. After some moderate prep, I revealed some more body chamber, but not any suture marks. The venter is oddly shaped as well, with a shallow U shape. It might be crushed, so I didn't pay it too much mind. I also discovered that the body chamber is much larger than any Metacoceras specimen I have found to date. In viewing the paper A NAUTILOID CEPHALOPOD FAUNA FROM THE PENNSYLVANIAN WINTERSET LIMESTONE OF JACKSON COUNTY, MISSOURI (full paper), I found plate 5 which features Domatoceras. They are known to exist here, but I've never found anything definitive. Here is the plate from the article: Here is a Metacoceras (CG-0071) on the left, and the specimen in question (CG-0068) on the right. Here is the venter of CG-0068 showing the two ridges marked with arrows. I feel these are similar to the ridges shown in Figure 2 of Plate 5 And that is that. Any cephalopod people have an opinion? I could prep it more, it's just at the labor intensive micro prepping state right now with solid cement like limestone overlaying it. One more photo of it for some additional context:
  15. Pennsylvanian Ammonoid

    I've had this specimen sitting in my "I'll get to it later" pile since last year. I've learned a lot about Cephalopods the past year, one of them being the differences between Nautiloids and Ammonoids. Upon re-inspection of this yesterday, I noticed the shell lines, but more importantly the suture lines caught my eye. These do exist here, but I would call them pretty rare to find. Not being an expert, I would consider Wellerites or Schistoceras, but these are based on quick comparisons using a Pennsylvanian Cephalopods of Ohio book I have. I started to clean up the rock using an air scribe, but I've only got about 30 minutes into it so far. I need to take much better photos, but the shell exterior is messy like this. You really need to rotate it under light and/or a microscope to see the sutures great. There is so scale in the photo, but it's 20mm from front to back of the inner exposed whorl. The top of the photo is still more shell continuing on another 9mm and I started to expose more suture pattern there. The top of the exposed whorl has some shell material pattern shown in a black color.
  16. Is this cow, horse, or other? Metacarpal? Thanks for looking and helping. If I am in the wrong place on the forum, I apologize.
  17. I have had these two teeth in my collection for a good few years now. I do love the shine on them especially the smaller black one. Based on these pictures can anybody see any signs of repair work on either? I’m hoping not. Both pictures taken in a dark room with flash on my camera. Also does anybody recognise the colours/presevation to put a rough idea on the state it was found in? Pretty sure these both are US found megs. thanks Liam
  18. FORMATION BINNING: A NEW METHOD FOR INCREASED TEMPORAL RESOLUTION IN REGIONAL STUDIES, APPLIED TO THE LATE CRETACEOUS DINOSAUR FOSSIL RECORD OF NORTH AMERICA by CHRISTOPHER D. DEAN , A. ALESSANDRO CHIARENZA and SUSANNAH C. R. MAIDMENT [Palaeontology, 2020, pp. 1–21] pala.12492.pdf
  19. ? fossil

    I found this imprint on a rock in my backyard. I live on the Potomac River in Shepherdstown West Virginia USA
  20. Kiowa tooth

    It's pretty obvious to me it's a fossil tooth: but from what? Kiowa formation and Albian. Approximately 1.1cm long.
  21. Shark or bony fish verts?

    How do you differ between bony fish vertebrae and shark vertebrae? What about these three vertebrae from Kiowa formation (Albian)? #1: approximately 5.5mm wide and 3mm thick. #2: approximately 5.5mm wide and 2.3mm thick. #3: approximately 4.8mm wide and 2.3mm thick.
  22. Brachiopod or Bivalve?

    Kiowa formation and Albian. Approximately 1.3cm long and its quite flat and thin. Not sure if it's brachiopod, more specifically a lingula brachiopod, or a bivalve. Unfortunately the umbo is missing so I'm not sure if it's symmetrical or not. I'm leaning more on bivalve but I would like to read your opinion. What's the lowest taxonomy level you can identify?
  23. A fragment of something; I thought it might be a part of fish spine or decapod pincer. From Kiowa formation and Albian. Approximately 5mm long.
  24. Kiowa Mysteries

    All from Kiowa formation (Albian). Identifying fossils from Kiowa formation has been incredibly challenging for me the last few months and I would need help on here! These possible fossil fragments have features that made me have second thoughts on whether if it's just suggestively rocks. They are suspiciously of biological origins, but I would like your opinions. #1: approximately 3mm long. It's quite smooth and featureless with some mineral staining. #2: approximately 10mm long. top view bottom view and it's fairly flat ...Continued below.
  25. I try to identify any fossils on my own before I post it on here, that's how I learn! Anyway, I found these three shark teeth while pre-washing the matrices from Kiowa Formation (Location: Ellsworth county, Kansas. Age: Albian). A couple of them came loose during pre-washing and I found another one still in the matrix. Tooth #1: Is this tooth from Meristodonoides sp.? The views are from front and back of this tooth. Approximately 2mm long. Tooth #2: Is this also from Meristodonoides sp.? Approximately 3mm long. Tooth #3: Is this from Leptostyrax sp.? Front and back views of this tooth. Approximately 6mm long.
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