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Found 152 results

  1. Newbie here, is this a fossil?

    Hello all! I found this on a beach of lake Michigan in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. I was wondering/hoping it might be a fossil, I joined this form hoping someone could identify it. It was found on 7/20 washed up on a beach of small stones. thank you in advance for any response.
  2. Please help identify my bumps.

    I am a complete novice. I have searched for fossils as a hobby but have never found anything like this. I found this near Lovell, Wyoming, near the base of the Big Horn mountains. It measures approximately 5cm x 5cm. Thanks for any help.
  3. Late Carboniferous Oyster or Clam II

    A second large Clam or Oyster? I dug a huge piece of limestone out of the hill and split it into three with a sledge hammer so that I could actually pick pieces up. After the heat this weekend, they were easy to pick apart once I got them home. Yesterday, I found the first piece. This is the one I found today. When it came out of the rock I was a bit shocked at how large it was. I carefully tapped around the specimen and was able to remove most of the surrounding rock carefully. This is the larger of the two pieces I found this weekend. I have less confidence in identifying it as has less features than the first piece. You can see shell material flaking off in the 3rd and 4th photos below. The fossil after I found it: Then, once I removed it from the rock:
  4. Late Carboniferous Oyster or Clam

    I love and hate finding large fossils. They are really interesting and striking to look at, but I have a hard time getting an ID on them. I dug a huge piece of limestone out of the hill and split it into three with a sledge hammer. After the heat this weekend, they were easy to pick apart. Yesterday, out popped this piece. There is another one I found today that I will be posting after this one. This piece has several wavy ridges. The shell material looks pearly, and perhaps some calcite replacement has happened. There was a piece of shell stuck on the mold portion as well. I'm seeing about 6 distinct ridges. Anyone know what it might be? Before I removed it from the rock: Several views after removing, trying to show the ridges:
  5. My fossil hunting friend came across this object in a creek in eastern Missouri. At first glance this ~1 cm diameter ball with stout spikes would seem to be some sort of camerate crinoid, but the spikes cover the entire surface, with no apparent place to put arms, column, mouth, or anus. (Side note: That must be the crinoid folksong community's version of "Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes.") From there my fallback would be coral, or perhaps sponge, but the complete coverage around the whole sphere (see attached video) has me a bit baffled. The creek flows through mostly Meramecian (Visean) Mississippian bedrock, in particular the Salem Limestone. There is abundant chert, with common silicified fossils, which is what I believe this to be, though I have not examined it myself. Perhaps this is the internal mold of something? The chert bits I have seen from this creek, and from this region in general, are by and large not internal molds, but rather proper replacement fossils. I guess this oddity just has me reaching. Any thoughts with regard to identification would be most appreciated. video-1562025086_u3dNmuqY_sDVP.mp4
  6. MAZON!

    Cameronlagerstmazon-2016-Palaeontology.pdf RAPID COMMUNICATION SACCOGLOSSUS TESTA FROM THE MAZON CREEK FAUNA (PENNSYLVANIAN OF ILLINOIS) AND THE EVOLUTION OF ACORN WORMS (ENTEROPNEUSTA: HEMICHORDATA) by CHRISTOPHER B. CAMERON Palaeontology, Vol. 59, Part 3, 2016, pp. 329–336] Cameron is mainly known for his work on recent invertebrates and their interrelationships,but he has some standing in the zoological community. qualification: NICE!!!!
  7. North American fossils id

    Hi guys! Recently i got these several teeth from one guy from the US.They were found somewhere in Florida but he doesn't know the exact names of the species which i'm looking right now. If someone could help it would be much appreciated. P.s. They are from pleistocene. Thanks, Darko
  8. Dredge spoils fossil ID help

    This and others like it were found on a dredge spoils beach on the Jekyll river on jekyll island, Georgia. Thank you for your help identifying this partial fossil. I presume it is a tooth, but I have been unable to find a reference for ID. I found four partial pieces similar to this, but the one in the photographs is most complete. There are two holes with a depression between them, and grooves on the outside edges on either side of the depression. Any help would be appreciated. Ruler represents inches.
  9. I am nearly sure the top piece is Metacoceras. The middle is a clam, but what species? Perhaps Astartella concentrica? The bottom, what is that thing? 6477/6478 show it in detail. I find these a lot. Are they brachiopods? Not shown, but there is a horn coral on the back of the piece in a cross section.
  10. stratigraphic framework of the Glenshaw

    link Martino, R. L., 2004, Sequence stratigraphy of the Glenshaw Formation(middle– late Pennsylvanian) in the central Appalachian basin, in :J. C. Pashin and R. A. Gastaldo, eds., Sequence stratigraphy,paleoclimate, and tectonics of coal-bearing strata: AAPG Studies in Geology 51, p. 1–28. size: about 6 Mb the emphasis is on sequence stratigraphy and (correlation of)paleosols: the need for a background of knowledge of these subjects lies in the gray area between "absolutely necessary" and "comes in handy"
  11. Importing fossils

    Hello all I recently saw a cool tooth on an American website. It's pretty expensive so I don't want to take too much risks. When I look up how much shipping and import costs to Europe would be it would be as much as half the price of the tooth itself. Is this normal or did I do something wrong? Anyone has any experience with this? The fossil is not illegal or anything, it comes from a perfectly legal location. I just think it's weird to pay like 1,5 times the price for a tooth. Looking forward to your answers and help. Greetings and thanks already.
  12. Dinosaur Tooth ID

    hello, many of you will have seen recent posts about this tooth. Alarmingly rather than help me to improve my services to you the great fossil community by helping me to rectifying my mistakes by supplying me with a more professional opinion of what this tooth might be sadly it was seen to be more of an exercise in ridicule at my expense. Therefore here is a chance for those peoples to redeem themselves with an apology by helping to correctly identify this tooth! Background... This tooth was bought as part of a private collection at the recent Tucson show. Sadly alot of the dinosaur material that I purchased had no to little identification apart from the formation with which it came and/or some vague location details. When I bought the collection I was privileged that @troodon was there to look over some of my purchases for me which I am very grateful for. This tooth was in this collection however the label that accompanied called it an Chirostenotes tooth from the two medicine, Teton county (with I presume is in Wyoming state). This was all the information I have. Hence why I stupidly did not question the validity of the identification and do more home work on the tooth before posting for sale.. my bad. However I recognised the tooth as being rather different to all the other teeth I had seen from my travels from the two medicine formation. Assessment so far... It clearly (now that I know) not a chirostenotes tooth nor an oviraptor tooth. (would have been pretty rare if so right! haha) to me it does not look tyrannosaurid. to me it is HUGE (measuring 2 cm long) for the usual raptorial teeth you see from this location. but clearly it is a theropod tooth. For me there is nothing to let me not think that it is from the two medicine formation. the collection came from a very reputable source and I was told that many of the teeth were found by the original owner. Conclusion... SO WHAT IS IT? Thank you for your time in looking at this post and for maturely assessing this tooth for me. Dealers can only improve their services if their knowledge base expands and their knowledge base improves to do this they need guidance from time to time. best wishes and look forward to your debate. fossils-uk
  13. Brachiopod?

    This one showed up after a rock split. The steinkern was really shiny and smooth. Usually the shell is hard to save, but I was able to when air chiseling away at this one. There are noticeable grooves on one side.
  14. Another small theropod tooth ID

    Hey guys, I have purchased another small theropod tooth from Hell Creek fm. This one is a little bit bigger (0,8cm) and seems to be more slender than the tooth identified by @Troodon as Dakotararaptor. It will be harder to ID since the serrations on the mesial edge are present, just quite worn. Mesial edge count will be tough and rough... The serration count midline for the distal edge is 6/mm. Thanks for any input and don’t hesitate to ask me fore more pictures. Kind rgards .
  15. Crinoid being prepared

    Hi everyone! I have recently acquired a crinoid from an old collection... I have never seen a crinoid of this type before but I think it comes from a famous fossil site maybe it comes from the usa.... I will soon prepare it but before that I need what exact species is that in order to have a mental image of the specimen and so avoid any damages while preparing it .... thanks for your help!
  16. /Florida fossil trip 2019/

    Hey guys! I was in peace river last month and it was sooo nice! (Im from Denmark) The water lvl was too high, but it didn't stop us from finding fossils We were 3 days in peace river and 1 day with a guy at an another creek. We didn't find any meg, only fraglodons But this result is nearly better than a meg Nice gator teeth, parrot fish mouth plates and alot of other fossils! Sorry for my bad pics, but i dont have a good phone haha
  17. Hi. I wanted help identifying a fossil tooth found in Florida. My son and I found it on the Peace River North of Wachula. We were sifting gravel from the middle of the river last week. I thought it to be alligator, but someone noted the ridge was distinctive enough that they didn't believe the tooth to be as such. It is slightly larger than an inch long. I can provide other pictures. Thank you Ken
  18. Starting as a shark tooth collector a long time ago, last year I became interested in dinosaur fossils and decided to start collecting them. Despite dinosaur material, especially from rare locations, being usually very expensive for a college student, over this year I managed to get some interesting specimens through numerous trades, sales and purchases, some of which I want to organize in this topic. So, let's begin with Early Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian). All of my material from this time comes from Cloverly formation in Montana and Wyoming. Tenontosaurus tilleti - a large basal ornithopod, I have tooth and a vertebra with ?bite marks And a rare Nodosaurid tooth - Sauropelta is the only one described, although there could potentially be more than one species Cenomanian stage (early Late Cretaceous) is not that well represented in North American dinosaur fossil record, I have a hadrosaur and dromaeosaurid teeth from Woodbine formation, Texas A very significant portion of dinosaur fossils from North America comes from Campanian deposits of various stages. Let's begin with Judith river formation in Montana. Got some nice theropods - Tyrannosauridae indet. (potentially present Daspletosaurus and Gorgosaurus cannot be differentiated based on teeth) on the left and Saurornitholestes sp. on the right. And a nice Ceratopsian tooth (again, cannot be identified to the genus level, too many of them present) There is another formation in Montana of a similar age - Two Medicine formation. Recently got some nice material from there I can show here. First, a maxillary tooth from a hadrosaur Gryposaurus latidens - easily identifiable by the presence of denticles near the crown apex. Unidentified hadrosaur tooth with a complete root
  19. Spirifer subaequalis?

    @Tidgy's Dad, I have this one as Spirifer subaequalis. Location and stratigraphic info in tags. Pedicle valve: ~14 plications in sinus at margin. >20 on either side of sinus at margin (some not preserved). Thoughts?
  20. White river: How hard?

    Hello all I don't have much prep experience, and since I have very bad eyes I have trouble with microscopes to prepare fossils. I would like to learn how to work with my airscribe tought. So I want to prep fairly large fossils I can do without microscope. I have some stuff from France and Belgium I found myself, but or these don't need prep, or I don't dare to because I don't want to destroy my rare self-found fossils. So I came across the fairly common white river stuff. I found a website where I can buy unprepped oreodont bones and skulls. But what do you to prep these? Are they possible for total newbies when it comes to prepping? Is the matrix fairly loose or is it very stiky? I have an air scribe but don't know how to use glue. I've tried trilobites before but those are too tiny. I'm looking forward to your advise.
  21. Douglas, Wyoming

    LINK edit( 4,1 MB) Evidence for a large Paleozoic Impact Crater Strewn Field in the Rocky Mountains Thomas Kenkmann, Kent A. Sundell & Douglas Cook NATURE SCIENTIFIC REPORTS | (2018) 8:13246 together with (possibly!!) Bedout (Australia) and the Malvinas (see the post by Oxytropidoceras*) that would make three records for the late Paleozoic * Is the Falkland Islands Basin an Enormous Impact Structure ?
  22. Tyrannosaurid Tooth ID

    Howdy, folks! So just thought I'd pop a thread up for a partial tooth in my collection. It was originally sold as "unknown - possible croc tooth" when I purchased it. I tried getting an ID on it a couple of years ago, but the lighting in the photos made serrations hard to see, and it was tough to distinguish small details.... So here's attempt #2 (with better pics)! Any confirmation of ID mucho appreciated. Locality: Hell Creek, USA (afraid exact location is unknown) Mesial view?: Distal view?: Cross section: Closer look at denticles:
  23. microbial Utah

    Microbial deposits in the aftermath of the end-Permian mass extinction: A diverging case from the Mineral Mountains(Utah, USA) EMMANUELLE VENNIN, NICOLAS OLIVIER, ARNAUD BRAYARD, IVAN BOUR, CHRISTOPHE THOMAZO, GILLES ESCARGUEL, EMMANUEL FARA, KEVIN G. BYLUND, JAMES F. JENKS, DANIEL A. STEPHEN and RICHARD HOFMANN Sedimentology (2015)62, 753–792 NB 170 MB One more P/Tr article with "aftermath" Any more and I'll have conniptions And now for the serious part:this is seriously good. ..really Yes it's large,in both memory space and number of pages,but the subject merits exhaustive treatment. 11 out of ten for this one Mathematically impossible,you say? Hah!
  24. I’m just an outdoorsman that picks up things when I think they’re neat or different looking. That being said, I found this thing several years ago, wondered over it a while, and then stuck it in a box. Saw it again tonight and got to doing a little research on what it might be and the closest match I came up with was a dinosaur tooth. So I’m asking if that is indeed what it is, or if it’s just a very toothy looking rock of some sort? Either way, I think it’s pretty interesting and would appreciate any best guesses or insight as to what it is. I found it in a wash, maybe 10-15 feet below the surrounding terrain. As best I can remember it was just laying there with some other rocks, a shard of native pottery, and some rusty thing I never identified. This is in upstate South Carolina, Abbeville County, USA. If any further info would help I would be glad to provide it. Just not sure what is needed, even after reading several of the “before you post” threads. But here goes...
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