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Found 166 results

  1. mosasaurmaastrichtian_fox_hills_fmwiswesterninterior_seawayusahe_synonymy_of_mosasaurus_maximus_with_mosasaurus_hoffmanni_reptilia_mosasauridae.pdf A mosasaur from the Maastrichtian Fox Hills Formationof the northern Western Interior Seaway of the United Statesand the synonymy of Mosasaurus maximus with Mosasaurus hoffmanni (Reptilia: Mosasauridae) Netherlands Journal of Geosciences —– Geologie en Mijnbouw | 94 – 1 | 23-37 | 2015
  2. Somehow,I think we're in Kansas

    MATZKE-lagerstniobrarepturt2007usa-Palaeontology.pdf [Palaeontology, Vol. 50, Part 3, 2007, pp. 669–691] AN ALMOST COMPLETE JUVENILE SPECIMEN OF THE CHELONIID TURTLE CTENOCHELYS STENOPORUS (HAY, 1905) FROM THE UPPER CRETACEOUS NIOBRARA FORMATION OF KANSAS,USA by ANDREAS T. MATZKE provenance:possibly Logan County
  3. cretaceous,USA,Pisces

    A new large Late Cretaceous lamniform shark from North America, with comments on the taxonomy, paleoecology, and evolution of the genus Cretodus Kenshu Shimada &Michael J. Everhart Article: e1673399 | Received 30 Nov 2018, Accepted 09 Sep 2019, Published online: 18 Nov 2019 LINK (description of Cretodus houghtonorum n.sp) edit:5,30 MB,or thereabouts relevant: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Containing Papers of a Biological Character Vol. 210 (1921), pp. 311-407 V I I I .— On the Calcification o f the Vertebral Centra in Sharks and Rays. B y W . G. R id e w o o d, D.Sc. 18 MB!!
  4. Carboniferous Limestone

    This piece of limestone looked like sea shells (clams or brachiopods) at first glance. However it’s one bumpy continuous surface. Any idea? The rock would be around 305 million years old. The rock broke easily along this surface which made it easy to see. Shells typically show white preserved Agagonite on them as well. No such preservation on this surface. Rock from Western Pennsylvania, United States. The surface is wet. Ruler is in inches.
  5. Edmontosaurus jaw

    Hello! I see these edmontosaurus jaws. Edmontosaurus jaw are common? What do you think? Are they good ones or not? Thank you so much. jaw 1
  6. Albertosaurus tooth

    Hello!!! I have been offered this tooth. The seller says it is from Albertosaurus and comes from Montana. Without restoration, they have only used glue. What do you think? Thank you very much and sorry for the quality of the photos but the seller does not know how to make them better ...
  7. Hello! I see this 3 pachycephalosaurus claws. The seller told me that are natural and not restored. Are restored? Wich one has better quality? Thank you so much!!
  8. Hello! I see this 3 edmontosaurus claws. The seller told me that are natural and not restored. Are restored? Wich one has better quality? Thank you so much!!
  9. Hello! I have seen this. The seller assures that it is completely natural and is not polished. What do you think? Is it a good piece? Thank you very much
  10. Late Cretaceous chalk in North America

    Hey everyone I know I've been lately rather inactive on TFF; I was held back by fieldwork and other reasons (though do expect some posts about the fieldwork next weekend ). But anyway, onto what I came to talk about... Would anyone know of some good exposures of Late Cretaceous chalk in Canada or USA? I'm thinking specifically about Campanian chalk or, even better, Maastrichtian chalk.. It would be great if the exposed chalk is very fossiliferous, of course. Thanks for any help! -Christian
  11. Good day everyone, I'm looking into these two partial mammal skulls: An oreodont Merycoidodon and a Camel Poebrotherium. I'd like some help to find out if these are all real or have been partially fabricated, enhanced, composited, total fakes. Photos 1-4: Merycoidodon culbertsoni Oligocene Nebraska Photos 5-8: Camel Poebrotherium labiatum Brule Formation Oligocene-Whiteriverian Converse County, Wyoming
  12. Florida tooth ID

    Hi! Can anyone help me out to identify this partial tooth? I was told that it belongs to a white-tailed deer but i don't see any similarities with it, cause i do have also partial tooth from that type of deer? The chewing zone on tooth although partial doesn't look to me as a deer tooth. So what it could be then? I know that is found somewhere in Florida and that belongs to Pleistocene period. It's pretty strange though. Darko
  13. Hi everyone, I'm looking for a little advice on how to ship heavy fossils internationally (from the USA to the UK). I thought the forum might be a good place to ask, as quite a few of you may have done this in the past. I have the opportunity to purchase around 500kg (around 1000 pounds) of small fossils from someone in the US. I'm sure I've read members discuss sending fossils back from Tuscon in the past using shipping containers and guess this would probably be the best way to go. Any advice on how this works would be greatly appreciated.
  14. No Idea What This is!

    Hi there! My partner took a trip to San Francisco and I asked him to bring me back a shell(I collect shells) and he comes home with this! I'm absolutely stumped! No idea what this could be. Input?
  15. Newbie here, is this a fossil?

    Hello all! I found this on a beach of lake Michigan in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA. I was wondering/hoping it might be a fossil, I joined this form hoping someone could identify it. It was found on 7/20 washed up on a beach of small stones. thank you in advance for any response.
  16. Please help identify my bumps.

    I am a complete novice. I have searched for fossils as a hobby but have never found anything like this. I found this near Lovell, Wyoming, near the base of the Big Horn mountains. It measures approximately 5cm x 5cm. Thanks for any help.
  17. Late Carboniferous Oyster or Clam II

    A second large Clam or Oyster? I dug a huge piece of limestone out of the hill and split it into three with a sledge hammer so that I could actually pick pieces up. After the heat this weekend, they were easy to pick apart once I got them home. Yesterday, I found the first piece. This is the one I found today. When it came out of the rock I was a bit shocked at how large it was. I carefully tapped around the specimen and was able to remove most of the surrounding rock carefully. This is the larger of the two pieces I found this weekend. I have less confidence in identifying it as has less features than the first piece. You can see shell material flaking off in the 3rd and 4th photos below. The fossil after I found it: Then, once I removed it from the rock:
  18. Late Carboniferous Oyster or Clam

    I love and hate finding large fossils. They are really interesting and striking to look at, but I have a hard time getting an ID on them. I dug a huge piece of limestone out of the hill and split it into three with a sledge hammer. After the heat this weekend, they were easy to pick apart. Yesterday, out popped this piece. There is another one I found today that I will be posting after this one. This piece has several wavy ridges. The shell material looks pearly, and perhaps some calcite replacement has happened. There was a piece of shell stuck on the mold portion as well. I'm seeing about 6 distinct ridges. Anyone know what it might be? Before I removed it from the rock: Several views after removing, trying to show the ridges:
  19. My fossil hunting friend came across this object in a creek in eastern Missouri. At first glance this ~1 cm diameter ball with stout spikes would seem to be some sort of camerate crinoid, but the spikes cover the entire surface, with no apparent place to put arms, column, mouth, or anus. (Side note: That must be the crinoid folksong community's version of "Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes.") From there my fallback would be coral, or perhaps sponge, but the complete coverage around the whole sphere (see attached video) has me a bit baffled. The creek flows through mostly Meramecian (Visean) Mississippian bedrock, in particular the Salem Limestone. There is abundant chert, with common silicified fossils, which is what I believe this to be, though I have not examined it myself. Perhaps this is the internal mold of something? The chert bits I have seen from this creek, and from this region in general, are by and large not internal molds, but rather proper replacement fossils. I guess this oddity just has me reaching. Any thoughts with regard to identification would be most appreciated. video-1562025086_u3dNmuqY_sDVP.mp4
  20. MAZON!

    Cameronlagerstmazon-2016-Palaeontology.pdf RAPID COMMUNICATION SACCOGLOSSUS TESTA FROM THE MAZON CREEK FAUNA (PENNSYLVANIAN OF ILLINOIS) AND THE EVOLUTION OF ACORN WORMS (ENTEROPNEUSTA: HEMICHORDATA) by CHRISTOPHER B. CAMERON Palaeontology, Vol. 59, Part 3, 2016, pp. 329–336] Cameron is mainly known for his work on recent invertebrates and their interrelationships,but he has some standing in the zoological community. qualification: NICE!!!!
  21. North American fossils id

    Hi guys! Recently i got these several teeth from one guy from the US.They were found somewhere in Florida but he doesn't know the exact names of the species which i'm looking right now. If someone could help it would be much appreciated. P.s. They are from pleistocene. Thanks, Darko
  22. Dredge spoils fossil ID help

    This and others like it were found on a dredge spoils beach on the Jekyll river on jekyll island, Georgia. Thank you for your help identifying this partial fossil. I presume it is a tooth, but I have been unable to find a reference for ID. I found four partial pieces similar to this, but the one in the photographs is most complete. There are two holes with a depression between them, and grooves on the outside edges on either side of the depression. Any help would be appreciated. Ruler represents inches.
  23. I am nearly sure the top piece is Metacoceras. The middle is a clam, but what species? Perhaps Astartella concentrica? The bottom, what is that thing? 6477/6478 show it in detail. I find these a lot. Are they brachiopods? Not shown, but there is a horn coral on the back of the piece in a cross section.
  24. stratigraphic framework of the Glenshaw

    link Martino, R. L., 2004, Sequence stratigraphy of the Glenshaw Formation(middle– late Pennsylvanian) in the central Appalachian basin, in :J. C. Pashin and R. A. Gastaldo, eds., Sequence stratigraphy,paleoclimate, and tectonics of coal-bearing strata: AAPG Studies in Geology 51, p. 1–28. size: about 6 Mb the emphasis is on sequence stratigraphy and (correlation of)paleosols: the need for a background of knowledge of these subjects lies in the gray area between "absolutely necessary" and "comes in handy"
  25. Importing fossils

    Hello all I recently saw a cool tooth on an American website. It's pretty expensive so I don't want to take too much risks. When I look up how much shipping and import costs to Europe would be it would be as much as half the price of the tooth itself. Is this normal or did I do something wrong? Anyone has any experience with this? The fossil is not illegal or anything, it comes from a perfectly legal location. I just think it's weird to pay like 1,5 times the price for a tooth. Looking forward to your answers and help. Greetings and thanks already.
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