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Found 98 results

  1. Type of Sharks Teeth

    I found these teeth on a North Carolina beach about 25 years ago and was always curious what type they may be. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  2. USA Paleontology Guide

    USA Paleontology Guide. Paleontology Guides Master Index link A annotated collection of paleontology information about the USA. Information covers topics that apply to all of, or to a large region of the USA. See link at top of page to go back to the Paleontology Guides Master Index. See my Arizona Paleontology Guide link as an example of what a Guide look like. This one of many Paleontology Guides that will be created by TFF members that organize and annotate paleontology information on a single subject. Content and links to that content will come from TFF, the internet and personal collections. The Paleontology Guides will be created and updated by editing TFF members. This index is a near stub and will be expanded in the future. Look for "link" next to subject for a link to a Guide. USA Paleontology Guide Literature Fruitbats pdfs link See Joe's awesome collection of free literature. He is a major inspiration for the Paleontology Guides project. Geology and Paleontology Societies State Geology Surveys link Maps Msc
  3. Miscellaneous texanian reconstructions

    I am hoping these are/can be of some use Offhand,I couldn't think of any other recons that showed the Permian basin* outlined * used here as a structural/hydrocarbon basin analysis term Desmoinesian(pars)/"Strawn"
  4. Matoaka Ecphora Hunt

    Warning: Lot’s of photos Well hello everyone, Ever since the monster rains we had I’ve been hearing about some great finds at Matoaka possibly hailing from the new slides. @Shark Tooth Hunter Found an awesome meg, @FossilsAnonymous walked out with some nice teeth and a big ole bone, and @I_gotta_rock found Ecphora(e), a plethora of inverts, and another big bone. She also said some person walked out with a chunk of clay bearing a complete cetecean vert and ribs. How could I pass this up? Though visions of megs danced in my head, I went with lower expectations (Matoaka is not the place you go to hunt megs). However, I love a good Ecphora! I was confident I could find a good one or two. Before I got there, I stopped at Jim’s roadside fossil stand. Had a good conversation with him, got to see some epic finds, and learned some good tips. Also bought some bones, ones kinda funny (get it! It’s a complete cetecean humerus! Permission to roll eyes and stop reading granted), and the next is a cetecean skull element, I’m not sure exactly what you call it (not up to date on my cetecean cranial osteology) but it holds the ear bones in it. Also got an Ecphora as a failsafe.
  5. This was found in a pile of old stones near my home (countryside of western New York State not that far from the shores of Lake Ontario.) the rocks were delivered to put down in a stone driveway and I happened to stumble across this a year or so ago. I would love to know what it is/was.
  6. Dipleura Cephalon ?

    Hi folks. I cracked into some very nice bryozoans today. Mostly the fenestella (?) and also see this item that looks like the upturned nose of a dipleura. Do you see the same ? Will post some pics of the bryozoans in the general section. Thanks.
  7. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral - Kansas, USA Kansas, USA Fossil Coral In Matrix Stone From Kansas USA 146 Grams. This is an in interesting specimen fossil coral in matrix stone found near the Kansas River. This stone was found in a glacial alluvial till sand bar area near the river. This stone weighs 146 grams and measures about 70mm by 50mm by 29mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  8. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral - Kansas, USA Kansas, USA Fossil Coral In Matrix Stone From Kansas USA 146 Grams. This is an in interesting specimen fossil coral in matrix stone found near the Kansas River. This stone was found in a glacial alluvial till sand bar area near the river. This stone weighs 146 grams and measures about 70mm by 50mm by 29mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  9. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral - Kansas, USA Kansas, USA Fossil Coral In Matrix Stone From Kansas USA 146 Grams. This is an in interesting specimen fossil coral in matrix stone found near the Kansas River. This stone was found in a glacial alluvial till sand bar area near the river. This stone weighs 146 grams and measures about 70mm by 50mm by 29mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  10. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral - Kansas, USA Kansas, USA Fossil Coral In Matrix Stone From Kansas USA 146 Grams. This is an in interesting specimen fossil coral in matrix stone found near the Kansas River. This stone was found in a glacial alluvial till sand bar area near the river. This stone weighs 146 grams and measures about 70mm by 50mm by 29mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  11. excursion/field guide/IOWA

    here(lessthan 5 Mb) The Cedar Valley/Lime creek piece by some noted experts would seem to steal the show fig 3,with its correlation chart(useful inclusion of a Vail T/R* cycle chart!!!!) Figure gets better and more useful each time I look at it *Transgressive/Regressive
  12. Possible Ammonite Fossil?

    Hello, I am new to the site, but I am a life long lover of all things nature. I found this little guy on the coast of California, most likely in San Simeon but possibly 30 minutes south, at Moonstone Beach. I found him about a year ago in August. He looks to be 6 1/2 centimeters. To forewarn everyone, I have little knowledge of history in terms of time periods, and am largely unfamiliar with geology as well such as rock types. I will describe as best I can per your requests. Please bear with me while I attempt to learn! Anyways, here he is. I believe him to be an ammonite but he has no spiral. Maybe a squid? Not even sure he is classified as a fossil, haha... Finally, thank you all so much for any and all responses, my scientific curiousity greatly appreciates it! Sincerely, Tyler North
  13. bit parts

    nowaklethd_arthropodan_microfossils_f.pdf about 3,8 Mb
  14. Texas, a short while back

    I liked the uncluttered format of this pic,decided to post it
  15. Gravicalymene celebra

    From the album Trilobites

    Gravicalymene celebra
  16. American Cheetah

    Proudly to represent American Cheetah ( Miracinonyx trumani)
  17. carboniferous Midcontinent

    Concise & clear.What more do you want? algeidcontin143.pdf About 1,5 Mb
  18. Hello again TTF! This will be my second post about my finds from my first trip to the peace river! This post is dedicated to one of my favourite finds and one of my favourite animals, the mammoth! During my trip to the peace river, I found many beautiful fossils myself, but I seemed to have had the best luck searching through other people's garbage. The location where I went to collect in was already visited many times by other people. Everything unwanted that turns up in their shifters is usually thrown to the banks, creating garbage piles. One particularly productive garbage pile produced many of my favourite Dugong ribs, my only meg (more on that later) and a mammoth tooth! How someone could look at these things and throw them away is beyond me. Unfortunately, the tooth was already fragmented when I found it. I believe that all the fragments came from the same tooth, though, because some fit together perfectly! I also have a question about this tooth. Is it possible to identify the species of mammoth from the tooth, either from its features or by looking at the known species of mammoth present in Florida? Thanks!
  19. King of the Dugong

    Happy March break TTF! I hope you all had a fantastic holiday! I have just gotten back from a fantastic trip to Florida. Thanks to TTF, I was lucky to discover the peace river. This discovery caused an entire re-write of my family's vacation plans. My father, who was also looking forward to walking through a swamp, agreed to join me on an expedition there. This was my first fossil hunting trip in Florida. I would also like to give my thanks and free advertising to Fossil Funatics, the tour operator who organized the hunt and provided the resources for us. We had a very successful two days. The guy is truly helpful, knowledgable, and fun to be around. He kindly gave all of his Dugong ribs and some of his shark teeth to me. We actually went to a stream which feeds into the actual peace river. As soon as we arrived there, I found myself overtaken by a sudden obsession with Dugong bones, earning my the titular nickname given to me by my dad. Since I have literally hundreds fossils from the river, this post will be dedicated to the Dugong bones. More posts on this are to follow! Enjoy!
  20. Hi guys, I was wondering if this is a real Ankylosaurus scute/ plate? It comes from hell creek formation, South-Dakota, Buffelo, USA
  21. Could use some help on these 0.5cm - 1cm invertebrate(?) conical spines in the well known Salem Limestone, a marine limestone of the American Midcontinent. They appear to be solid calcite but do not quite match up with the shapes of crinoid spines and echinoid spines that I know from the Mississippian. I have looked at umpteen Salem Limestone samples but have seen these spines at only one small locality. Any insights appreciated! but please provide your reasoning or evidence.
  22. Location: SE Portage County, Central Wisconsin, USA. Geology: South Western advance of Green Bay Glacial Lobe. Former Glacial Lake Oshkosh. Niagara Escarpment Debris. My land. Ordovician onward. Trying to learn, but am confused. I tentatively identified the below specimen as a Honeycomb coral, based on info from the below and input from local “experts”. None are Paleontologists, but one is a Natural History Museum Director. Begin quote: Favositid tabulates: Honeycomb corals The favositid corals are quite common. They usually formed large colonies. The corallite is prismatic in shape, resembling honeycombs. Favositids have mural pores, tiny holes in the wall of the skeleton, which connect different corallites. These pores are distributed in characteristic patterns and numbers, which are useful for distinguishing the various types of favositids. Favositids lived from the Ordovician to the Permian, at which time they became extinct. They are most abundant in middle Silurian to lower Devonian rock. Favosites is the most common fossil coral in Wisconsin. https://wgnhs.uwex.edu/wisconsin-geology/fossils-of-wisconsin/coral-gallery/corals/ Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, UW Extension The confusing part is that some surfaces of this specimen show no pattern or regular form. Just like most of my finds. Are there any clues to indicate a rock of this structure may be a coral? Other than cutting it open? I have about 50 like this, but only two others show the typical pattern. The rest just have the “circles” on all sides. All are basically the same composition of material, but colors vary. All have inclusions of crystals. My vision is limited, so I only know what I have found after I wash it and look under a lighted magnifier with a loop. Photographing helps a lot as well. I just go on shape and colors when picking up. Then use a small hand held magnifying glass to examine. Sometimes wash off with a little water first. My son in law, who has (almost) a geology minor from local University, is amazed at what the glaciers “dumped” on my land. Note that a large part of the classes were related to local fossils, due to the abundance of them. Please let me know if my ID is correct, and any pointers for identifying specimens which do not show the structure, only the “circles” or “cavities”. Thank you. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  23. Straparollous?  Holopea pyrene?

    Location: SE Portage County, Central Wisconsin, USA. Geology: South Western advance of Green Bay Glacial Lobe. Former Glacial Lake Oshkosh. Niagara Escarpment Debris. My land. Ordovician onward. Is this a Straparollous? Holopea pyrene? Left some slightly blurry photos in to show cm size. The part in question is about .4 cm deep by 1.5 cm wide. There is also what might be a bivalve to the right of it, and maybe, chain coral. Dunno about what is shown on reverse. Looking for potential ID on all and anything else someone might see. Wondering if I should give this a toilet bowl cleaner (diluted) bath? The “snail” appears to be a quartz replacement. I did initial cleaning in Biz detergent for about 24 hours, repeatedly and several days in Oxyclean. Brushed after each soak with polyester bristle brush. Did not want to destroy the crystals above specimens, so avoided wire brush. Please let me know what you think. I also want to be sure I am using correct tags here. Since my land contains Ordovician onward period, should I just list Ordovician as the period? Also, how many tags are appropriate? Should they just be location found and potential period, or should they contain generic terms such as snail? Do not want to guess on period yet. If anyone else here is using an IPhone SE for photos and knows some ways to set it, I would be appreciative. I have been unable to figure out how to change the settings for photographing specimens. The camera has a mind of it’s own, and focuses on whatever it wants, even though I am doing everything that my provider told me to do to change the settings for macro. She said phone is capable of it, but required my digging into the depths, which I did. When I transfer photos from phone to computer they come up at 72 DPI. I am using Photoshop elements to change resolution and size, which usually causes photos to be blurry. Upon transfer, I have photos that are about 40 Meg. Once I adjust the size, they are down to less than 2 Meg. Then adjust focus and color cast to be as realistic as possible. I have figured out the best time of day for taking photos with my portable photo tent, LED light and natural light through patio doors. Also made a stable phone holder to help prevent blurry photos. Thinking there has to be an easier way, as each photo I post takes about 5-10 minutes total. Sorry, obsessive compulsive newbie here, lol. Thanks for looking and any comments appreciated. If my ID is off, no problem. top 3 3-16-4 3-16-3 3-16-2 3-16-2 3-16-1 3-16-8 3-16-9 3-16-10 3-16-12 3-26-6 shell side1 Fernwood Acres, on Flickr side 2 snail 1c Thank you.
  24. Camping in the Campanian

    CAROLI 8.6 Mb Thesis by Crane,lemon,basket etc Area:Elizabethtown
  25. BRACHIOPOD

    Rhynchonellids are hard to identify by exterior morphology as they often need to have their internal structures visible to be sure of an id. However if you know the faunal lists from a specific area, you can reduce the candidates considerably. The specimen here has 22 costae with 4 on the fold and thus, at this size must be one of two species, Rostricellula minnesotensis or Rhynchotrema wisconsinensis. The only completely safe way to differentiate between the two is the presence or absence of a cardinal process in the brachial valve but this is not possible here. However, Rostricellula usually, though not always, devoid of shell ornamentation, such as ridges or the presence of growth lines, and Rhynchotrema wisconsinensis usually, though not always, shows these, though they can also be seemingly absent through wear. But, R. wisconsinensis never shows a length to width ratio of 1.00, only from 0.80 to 0.95 and this specimen has a ratio of 1.00 which does occur in Rostricellula. Furthermore, the fold of Rostricellula is wider and less sharply developed Finally, good specimens of Rostricellula are far more common than R wisconsinense at the locality as the species most commonly found here is Rhynchotrema ainsiei which is describe elsewhere and not to be confused with the other two due to it's larger number of costae Thus, I am fairly confident with my id
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