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Found 109 results

  1. Hello everyone I am a fossil collector but I have never bought fossils from online before now, so I am very skeptical of every fossil I see online. If you can help me to confirm the fossils in the pictures below are authentic (and are what they say they are) I would be very thankful. Thank you! Acheroraptor temertyorum (tooth) Pachycephalosaurus (tooth) Ankylosaurus (scute) Thescolosaurus (tooth)
  2. something or nothing?

    stone 1.5 inches location: west of Houston in Brookshire from a gravel load from Brazos River. a small portion of the one end of stone is chipped off.
  3. John S. Peel Department of Earth Sciences (Palaeobiology), Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden GFF ,2018, Vol. 140, No. 3, 249–253 A new look at Pleurotomaria perlata Hall, 1852 (Gastropoda) from the Silurian of Laurentia peelgastropmollusilurpaleozoic at Pleurotomaria perlata Hall 1852 Gastropodan of Laurentia.pdf about 1,1 MB HIGHLY RECOMMENDED brief discusions on /comparisons with : Liospira,Pycnotrochus
  4. Rahmat_phocarnivmammamarinel_2017_New_Miocene_Monachinae_from_the_Chesapeake_Bay.pdf Vestnik zoologii, 51(3): 221–242, 2017 NEW MIOCENE MONACHINAE FROM THE WESTERN SHORE OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY (MARYLAND, USA) S. J. Rahmat¹*, I. A. Koretsky¹, J. E. Osborne², A. A. Alford² species decribed:Terranectes,Leptophoca,mostly postcranial material about 2,4 Mb ->urn:lsid:zoobank.org:pub:F727C8DF-EE1F-4A99-8EA5-647859C72E58 outtake:
  5. LINK(about 23 MB) Foster,J.R.,Hunt-Foster,R.K.,Gorman,M.A.II,Trujillo,K.C.,Suarez,C.A.,McHugh,J.B.,Peterson,J.E.,Warnock,J.R.,Schoenstein,H.E. Paleontology,taphonomy and sedimentology of the Mygatt-Moore Quarry,a large dinosaur bonebed in the Morrison Formation,WEstern Colorado-implications for upper JUrassic dinosaur preservation modes:Geology of the Intermountain West,v.5,p.23-93 TABLE OF CONTENTS OF THE PUBLICATION: general impression: NICE JOURNAL,more or less of a "technical" nature
  6. Edmontosaurus Vertebra

    A partial neural arch of a cervical vertebra of an Edmontosaurus.
  7. Paleozoic selachians from the USA

    Johnson/2003Mitt.Mus.NaturkBerl., Geowiss. Reihe 6 (2003) 125-160 Nature of the beast (pun intended): taxonomical (systematic) Monograph " Dentitions of Barbclabomia (new genus, Chondrichthyes: Xenacanthiformes) from the Upper Palaeozoic of North America Gary D. Johnson' With 14 figures and 3 tables recommended, particularly for those interested in xenacanthids, orthacanthids, etc About 5 Mb Abstract Barbclabornia luedersensis (Berman, 1970) is defined on the basis of small (2 111117 high) isolated teeth that lack an intermediate cusp. It is known from the Lower Permian and possibly the Upper Pennsylvanian of North America. The two principal cusps are slightly curved orally, nearly parallel, and bear cristae mainly on their distal halves. They are cylindrical but become compressed proximally. The long axis of each cusp base is >45" to the labial margin of the tooth base. The base bears a prominent apical button in contact with the cusps; a central foramen is absent. Fewer than ten foramina occur on the aboral surface of the base, which bears a prominent concave basal tubercle. The shape of the base ranges from somewhat triangular to quadrangular. The cusps are composed of orthodentine covered by hypermineralized pallial dentine; the base is composed of orthodentine but may also contain trabecular dentine. Except for the possible occurrence of symphysial teeth, the dentition is homodont. Barbclabornia cf. B. luedersensis is stratigraphically highest in the known range of the genus and is restricted to the nearly lowermost part of the Clear Fork Group (Artinskian) of Texas. The teeth are similar to B. lztedersensis, but are more robust and have a quadrangular-shaped base. Barbclabornia was large, based on an undescribed palatoquadrate some 45 cm long. It was probably freshwater and is most closely related to Triodus. Key words: Chondrichthyans, Xenacanthiformes, Early Permian, North America.
  8. Mazonia 2018 short (re)view

    http://jgs.lyellcollection.org/content/jgs/early/2018/07/30/jgs2018-088.full.pdf. THIS IS: The Mazon Creek Lagerstätte: a diverse late Palaeozoic ecosystem entombed within siderite concretions View ORCID ProfileThomas Clements, View ORCID ProfileMark Purnell and Sarah Gabbott Journal of the Geological Society, https://doi.org/10.1144/jgs2018-088 about 2,1 MB and the usual JGSL quality
  9. From the album Permian era fossils

    Reverse side of the unidentified Edaphosaurus pogonias bone with an apparent Dimetrodon tooth hole.
  10. Edaphosaurus with large predator bite

    From the album Permian era fossils

    Yet unidentified Edaphosaurus pogonias bone from the Permian era Red Beds site in North Texas, with large unhealed tooth hole from what appears to be a large Dimetrodon's bite, from either the fatal attack, or post-death predation mark.
  11. Kritosaurus Jaw

    A fragment of a left jaw dentary bone from a Kritosaurus.
  12. Type of Sharks Teeth

    I found these teeth on a North Carolina beach about 25 years ago and was always curious what type they may be. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  13. USA Paleontology Guide

    USA Paleontology Guide. Paleontology Guides Master Index link A annotated collection of paleontology information about the USA. Information covers topics that apply to all of, or to a large region of the USA. See link at top of page to go back to the Paleontology Guides Master Index. See my Arizona Paleontology Guide link as an example of what a Guide look like. This one of many Paleontology Guides that will be created by TFF members that organize and annotate paleontology information on a single subject. Content and links to that content will come from TFF, the internet and personal collections. The Paleontology Guides will be created and updated by editing TFF members. This index is a near stub and will be expanded in the future. Look for "link" next to subject for a link to a Guide. USA Paleontology Guide Literature Fruitbats pdfs link See Joe's awesome collection of free literature. He is a major inspiration for the Paleontology Guides project. Geology and Paleontology Societies State Geology Surveys link Maps Msc
  14. Miscellaneous texanian reconstructions

    I am hoping these are/can be of some use Offhand,I couldn't think of any other recons that showed the Permian basin* outlined * used here as a structural/hydrocarbon basin analysis term Desmoinesian(pars)/"Strawn"
  15. Matoaka Ecphora Hunt

    Warning: Lot’s of photos Well hello everyone, Ever since the monster rains we had I’ve been hearing about some great finds at Matoaka possibly hailing from the new slides. @Shark Tooth Hunter Found an awesome meg, @FossilsAnonymous walked out with some nice teeth and a big ole bone, and @I_gotta_rock found Ecphora(e), a plethora of inverts, and another big bone. She also said some person walked out with a chunk of clay bearing a complete cetecean vert and ribs. How could I pass this up? Though visions of megs danced in my head, I went with lower expectations (Matoaka is not the place you go to hunt megs). However, I love a good Ecphora! I was confident I could find a good one or two. Before I got there, I stopped at Jim’s roadside fossil stand. Had a good conversation with him, got to see some epic finds, and learned some good tips. Also bought some bones, ones kinda funny (get it! It’s a complete cetecean humerus! Permission to roll eyes and stop reading granted), and the next is a cetecean skull element, I’m not sure exactly what you call it (not up to date on my cetecean cranial osteology) but it holds the ear bones in it. Also got an Ecphora as a failsafe.
  16. This was found in a pile of old stones near my home (countryside of western New York State not that far from the shores of Lake Ontario.) the rocks were delivered to put down in a stone driveway and I happened to stumble across this a year or so ago. I would love to know what it is/was.
  17. Dipleura Cephalon ?

    Hi folks. I cracked into some very nice bryozoans today. Mostly the fenestella (?) and also see this item that looks like the upturned nose of a dipleura. Do you see the same ? Will post some pics of the bryozoans in the general section. Thanks.
  18. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral - Kansas, USA Kansas, USA Fossil Coral In Matrix Stone From Kansas USA 146 Grams. This is an in interesting specimen fossil coral in matrix stone found near the Kansas River. This stone was found in a glacial alluvial till sand bar area near the river. This stone weighs 146 grams and measures about 70mm by 50mm by 29mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  19. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral - Kansas, USA Kansas, USA Fossil Coral In Matrix Stone From Kansas USA 146 Grams. This is an in interesting specimen fossil coral in matrix stone found near the Kansas River. This stone was found in a glacial alluvial till sand bar area near the river. This stone weighs 146 grams and measures about 70mm by 50mm by 29mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  20. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral - Kansas, USA Kansas, USA Fossil Coral In Matrix Stone From Kansas USA 146 Grams. This is an in interesting specimen fossil coral in matrix stone found near the Kansas River. This stone was found in a glacial alluvial till sand bar area near the river. This stone weighs 146 grams and measures about 70mm by 50mm by 29mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  21. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Rugose Coral - Kansas, USA Kansas, USA Fossil Coral In Matrix Stone From Kansas USA 146 Grams. This is an in interesting specimen fossil coral in matrix stone found near the Kansas River. This stone was found in a glacial alluvial till sand bar area near the river. This stone weighs 146 grams and measures about 70mm by 50mm by 29mm. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa Subclass: †Rugosa (Milne-Edwards and Haime, 1850)
  22. Excursion/Field guide/IOWA

    here(lessthan 5 Mb) The Cedar Valley/Lime Creek piece by some noted experts would seem to steal the show. Fig 3, with its correlation chart. (useful inclusion of a Vail Transgressive/Regressive cycle chart!!!!) Figure gets better and more useful each time I look at it.
  23. Possible Ammonite Fossil?

    Hello, I am new to the site, but I am a life long lover of all things nature. I found this little guy on the coast of California, most likely in San Simeon but possibly 30 minutes south, at Moonstone Beach. I found him about a year ago in August. He looks to be 6 1/2 centimeters. To forewarn everyone, I have little knowledge of history in terms of time periods, and am largely unfamiliar with geology as well such as rock types. I will describe as best I can per your requests. Please bear with me while I attempt to learn! Anyways, here he is. I believe him to be an ammonite but he has no spiral. Maybe a squid? Not even sure he is classified as a fossil, haha... Finally, thank you all so much for any and all responses, my scientific curiousity greatly appreciates it! Sincerely, Tyler North
  24. Bit parts

    nowaklethd_arthropodan_microfossils_f.pdf about 3,8 Mb
  25. Texas, a short while back

    I liked the uncluttered format of this pic,decided to post it
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