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Found 174 results

  1. capital reef oysters II

    Hello all Here is a companion query for help. This item is flat, tapered to the top and slightly concave from the underside. The two pictures are a top view and a bottom view. It is about 2” thick. The scaliness, if there is such a word, looks like Exogyra, but does not have the curved narrow end described for Exogyra. I assumed this was a flat mollusk shell when I picked it up (E of Capital Reef, south of Rt 24, about 4 miles outside the park) but can’t find a match with the limited references I have. Help appreciated. Thanks. Tom
  2. Help to ID Trilobites fron Wheeler Formation

    Hello friends, I need your help to learn a little more, I am not an expert in trilobites, in fact what I own are the Brachiopods, but accommodating my fossils, I found myself very similar and they filled me with doubts, can you could help me distinguish between an interstricted Peronopsis and a Ptychagnostus atavis, both of the Upper Cambrian, of the Wheeler Formation, in House Range, Millard county, Utah. Thank you.
  3. capital reef utah oysters

    Hello all, I’d appreciate help with two sets of oyster fossils from Capital Reef, Utah. This post has one object, another post will have the other, due to photo size constraints. These were collected to the E of Capital Reef, in south of Rt 24, 4.2 miles outside the park, on a road heading south. From other discussion, I see references to a limited range of species found here, some posts on the Forum and other places, say they find a single species (Pycnodonte). I think I have something different.The pictures on this post are a cluster rounded oblong shapes, ranging from about 1” to somewhat larger. The picture is from the top and from the bottom. Any help appreciated. Thanks. Tom
  4. Mosasaur Teeth?

    I bought these at a Rock Shop in or near Moab Utah. Pretty sure the dude said they were from around there. What do you guys think?
  5. This spring break (March 17th-23rd) my girlfriend and I are planning a trip in Utah, Wyoming, and Colorado. It looks like most of the big dig sites are closed for the season, which was a disappointment for us to see. The tentative plan was to go through Kemmerer from Salt Lake (home,) and hit the digs sites there, go through Vernal to the Quarry and the Prehistoric Museum there, then to Dinosaur National Monument in Colorado with a possibility of hitting Price Utah and the Cleveland Lloyd Quarry on the way back. Without any of the digs open, it seems like we're just trying to find simple things to kill our time, but we'd rather be out doing more engaging fossil hunting or learning. Does anyone have recommendations for areas somewhere nearby where our travels will take us? Any suggestions for digs, museums, cool fossil shops, or even just pretty places to camp are all welcome and greatly appreciated!
  6. A cute T-rex cousin from Utah

    https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/02/moros-fills-tyrannosaur-origin-story/583264/ https://www.newsweek.com/new-dinosaur-utah-moros-intrepidus-tyrannosaurus-rex-1338776?piano_t=1
  7. I'm trading a bunch of fossils mainly from Utah and Wyoming but some other locations as well. In return I'm looking for theropod teeth, ammonites, trilobites, crabs, gastropods, and more shark teeth or anything else that's interesting. You can reply here directly or PM me. I'll post another set some time later this week. Here is the assortment. Wyoming Knightia (Green River Formation, Eocene) Assortment of brachiopods, a crinoid holdfast in the middle, and pyritized worm burrows from Paulding Co, Ohio (Silica Shale, Devonian) Fossilized Great White tooth from Cape Town Another Great White: Knightia Elrathia kingii (Wheeler Shale Utah, Cambrian) The following Wyoming Knightia (Green River Formation, Eocene) Some are in better condition. There's a couple that haven't been completely prepared. I know some of you like to prepare your own fossils: Elrathia kingii More Paulding Ohio fossils (horned corals and brachiopods): A Phareodus scale: Another Great White: A St. Mary's formation Chesapecten conglomerate from Calvert Cliffs, MD:
  8. Here are two interesting Pennsylvanian fossils that I bought at the Flagg Gem and Mineral Show in Mesa, Arizona (~4.5 inches wide) from the Apex Mine near St. George, Utah hosted in the Callville Limestone. A Chatetes sp. sponge is coated in azurite and malachite. Syringopora sp. coral molds are in goethite with significant germanium and gallium values. The goethite replaced the limestone. See this USGS article about the mine: https://pubs.usgs.gov/bul/1577/report.pdf
  9. How I Found Fossils in the Snow

    The cabin fever I’ve had the last couple months finally drove me mad. Inspired by the posts of @KimTexan, @FranzBernhard, @Al Tahan, and @Calico Jack. I decided to brave the snow and cold and attempt a new place that I had been contemplating visiting for several months now. This was not the easiest time to be hunting and probably not the safest thing to do as I haven’t seen a lot of the fossils in the formation, the entire outcrop may be under a foot of snow, and adding snow to any fossil trip is inherently more dangerous. But I tried to insure the highest chance of success and safety and I will now share my experience with this. I don’t claim to be a professional and I don’t claim this is safe, if you attempt to hike and hunt fossils in the snow you do so at your own risk. Since, I didn’t know what exactly the fossils looked like, I had only glimpsed at a couple specimens in a couple local museums. I took to the internet for any pictures I could find. I found this thread This website http://www.ammonoid.com/Manning.html This paper https://emp.byui.edu/STRICKLAND/fossil.pdf And various examples for sale that I won’t link here. I just basically looked at anything and everything from the formation to get a sense of what the fossils looked like. To make sure I was going to the right location I looked at geologic maps via the apps I have listed here I looked land ownership maps like this one https://platmap.trustlands.utah.gov/ and this one https://blm-egis.maps.arcgis.com/apps/webappviewer/index.html?id=6f0da4c7931440a8a80bfe20eddd7550 And a couple other more site specific maps to double check. I also looked at a topographic map of the area with geologic maps overlaid https://geology.utah.gov/apps/intgeomap/index.html# Sattelite images from https://www.google.com/earth/ and roadmaps like this one https://www.google.com/maps I knew I may not have cellular reception so I brought a Garmin eTrex GPS as my field instrument along with extra batteries. I also brought a rugged Brunton compass in case my batteries all died. Some tips: Research how the area generally is during winter. Look up depths of snow in the area if available, any road closures, if available, where snow plows will plow in the event of a snow storm, take a look at the weather forecast, look up roads or trails you will use as escape routes during snow storms, etc. Having camped in the snow and have done a decent amount of winter sports like ice fishing, I know how to dress warm. Remember more layers is better. It’s better to have to remove layers than add some because you may not have any extra clothes to add. On the other hand, try not to break a sweat as that sweat will cool you down very quickly and may put you at risk of hypothermia. Make sure to bring And ALWAYS notify someone where you are going, when you are going, how long you will probably be, what you will be doing there, and if needed how you are getting there. FOR MORE TIPS refer to this handy guide by the Boy Scouts http://www.boyscouttrail.com/library/wintercampingtips.asp This article from Backpacker https://www.backpacker.com/skills/beginner/winter-camping And this article from Backcountry https://www.backcountry.com/explore/winter-camping-101-gear-tips-for-staying-warm
  10. Brachiopods or leaves?

    How’s everybody doing? I’ve got some fossils I need ID’d. They are from the Manning Canyon Shale in Utah. They are Late Mississippian/Early Pennsylvanian in age. Thanks!
  11. Permian crinoid

    Hello helpful fossiliers, Help please. These fossils came from outside Moab close to the Colorado River, but on a high shelf. The river is not visible from this location. Roadside Geology of Utah identifies this area as Permian, as did a BLM paleontologist. They are from about 10-15 miles SW from Moab. The rocks are largely a red base (clay?) with a gray-er surface. These three pictures are actually 3 different locations on the rock, but I think (wonder if) they are the same life form. The first is about 2 mm long. The ruler shows a mm scale. You can see the cross section end of the item on the fossil closest to the ruler. The second is a round disc from elsewhere on the surface and the third is a connected series of round discs. My sense is that the disc and connect discs are crinoid segments. Is the first picture also a crinoid, or am I way off on all this? I can post additional pictures if anyone asks. Thanks. Tom
  12. Gerster Fm. Productid Brachiopods

    This particular species had spines attached to the shell which is not all that common. There are four spines attached on the thumbnail brachiopod. The holes in the shells were where spines used to be attached. Found during this trip here:
  13. Acrothele subsidua

    Found associated with Elrathia kingii and Itagnostus interstricta trilobites. See field trip report here:
  14. I recently just visited the University of Utah and they have a large display of petrified wood from all over. Here are some of them. large logs by the stairs
  15. This is a continuation of my last post with @UtahFossilHunter going back to the island last minute before the snow flies. This time we tried another outcrop of the Undifferentiated Cambrian (now determined to be the Chisholm Formation) on the search for fossils. Link to Part 1  Here is the map on my last post.  This is the Chisholm Formation at the foot of the mountain.  We went up farther on the mountain and found a contact zone. Being a large dipping anticline going down the slope at an angle, the rock layers get older on the bottom then the top. Other places on the island the rock layers are rotated sideways so we kept going right and slightly down more.  We kept going up and we found some Bonneville gravel.  Further along we found lots of a good structural rock with en echelon fractures from nearby faults. But no fossils. We decided to check a few other rock layers again just in case. The Ordovician Garden City Formation had absolutely nothing. So we went back down and drove to another place where the Silurian Laketown Dolomite outcrops so we hike up and.....  We found our first Silurian fossil! We didn't expect anything to be in this formation. Unlucky for us, it was on a boulder so we thought we had to take out a chunk of it. UtahFossilHunter and I had forgot our chisels but we had our hammers. So for ten minutes we kept trying to break off the chunk it was sitting in. You can see in the pictures the fossil was on a ledge. The bedding layer below was a large chert nodule layer so every time we hit it you could hear little shards zooming by like ricocheted bullets. After that ten minutes while watching the snow clouds make their way across the Utah-Nevada border, we decided to take a risk and try popping the fossil out just underneath the shell. That risk payed off and it came out whole. The lesson here is if you know you might be looking in hard rock layers don't forget your chisels. 
  16. Triassic Pterosaur Found In Utah

    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/rare-desert-pterosaur-fossil-discovered-utah-180969995/
  17. Hunting on a Bike

    A bit of a weird trip yesterday. I combined two hobbies at the same time. You may have seen me wondering what fossil hunting was like on a boat. So I tried the desert version of a canoe: a mountain bike. This is part of the ongoing research on Fossils of Stansbury Island that @Earth Chemistry is conducting there (See thread here). I packed my bike and back pack and drove to the southern tip of the island. We had these layers down before my trip. Red is no fossils, green is fossils.
  18. Itagnostus interstrictus

    Found during a trip out to a hill right adjacent to U-Dig Fossil Quarry. The trip report can be FOUND HERE. This is the largest I've collected. Typical sizes I've found are 3-6mm in length, 1-3mm in width.
  19. Mancos Shale Ammonite: Help Wanted!

    I've been looking for an ID for this big boy. So far I've found this site (http://www.ammonoid.com/Prionocyclus.htm) but I'm not sure what I'm looking for to differentiate between them. Could anybody more knowledgeable help me out?
  20. I had a bit of spare time today so I thought I'd prep a trilobite or two from my trip around the Confusion and House Ranges of Utah. (See trip report here) I had found this guy in someone else's throwaway pile probably after it came out chipped and subsequently scraped. I didn't think it was worth leaving out in the elements so I brought it home. Here's a before picture. After 4 hours of swapping between dental picks, wire brushes, toothpicks, and various Dremel attachments here is my final product. It's not perfect at all but I think it deserves to be admired for a time because it has not been on this earth for over 490 million years just to be chucked aside when it finally reached the surface. I even gave it a polish using a piece of newspaper. I don't think it came out too badly. The scrape is still visible on the thoracic segments but there's not much more I can do for that. What do you guys think?
  21. New bird from the Cretaceous of Utah

    hey everyone - hope you're all well Thought this was worth sharing - a description of a well-preserved enantiornithean bird specimen from the Late Cretaceous Kaiparowits Formation of Utah. It represents a new genus and species, Mirarce eatoni. The specimen was originally collected in 1992, but it was only recently described (and published yesterday!). Atterholt et al. (2018). The most complete enantiornithine from North America and a phylogenetic analysis of the Avisauridae. PeerJ, DOI 10.7717/peerj.5910 Abstract: The most complete known North American enantiornithine was collected in 1992 but never formally described. The so-called “Kaiparowits avisaurid” remains one of the most exceptional Late Cretaceous enantiornithine fossils. We recognize this specimen as a new taxon, Mirarce eatoni (gen. et sp. nov.), and provide a complete anatomical description. We maintain that the specimen is referable to the Avisauridae, a clade previously only known in North America from isolated tarsometatarsi. Information from this specimen helps to clarify evolutionary trends within the Enantiornithes. Its large body size supports previously observed trends toward larger body mass in the Late Cretaceous. However, trends toward increased fusion of compound elements across the clade as a whole are weak compared to the Ornithuromorpha. The new specimen reveals for the first time the presence of remige papillae in the enantiornithines, indicating this feature was evolved in parallel to dromaeosaurids and derived ornithuromorphs. Although morphology of the pygostyle and (to a lesser degree) the coracoid and manus appear to remain fairly static during the 65 million years plus of enantiornithine evolution, by the end of the Mesozoic at least some enantiornithine birds had evolved several features convergent with the Neornithes including a deeply keeled sternum, a narrow furcula with a short hypocleidium, and ulnar quill knobs—all features that indicate refinement of theflight apparatus and increased aerial abilities. We conduct the first cladistic analysis to include all purported avisuarid enantiornithines, recovering an Avisauridae consisting of a dichotomy between North and South American taxa. Based on morphological observations and supported by cladistic analysis, we demonstrate Avisaurus to be paraphyletic and erect a new genus for “A. gloriae,” Gettyia gen. nov. here's the paper: Atterholt et al. Hope you like it! -Christian
  22. Kirkland, James I., 2018, Utah’s Early Cretaceous Fossils Provide Critical Data on the Opening of the Atlantic Ocean Utah Geological Survey – Survey Notes vol. 50, no. 3, pp. 6-7. https://ugspub.nr.utah.gov/publications/survey_notes/snt50-3.pdf https://geology.utah.gov/map-pub/survey-notes/atlantic-fossils/ Kirkland, J.I., Suarez, M., Suarez, C. and Hunt-Foster, R., 2016. The Lower Cretaceous in east-central Utah —the Cedar Mountain Formation and its bounding strata. Geology of the Intermountain West, 3, pp. 101-228. https://www.utahgeology.org/giw/index.php/giw/article/view/v03-04-kirkland https://www.researchgate.net/publication/312190529_THE_LOWER_CRETACEOUS_IN_EAST-CENTRAL_UTAH_THE_CEDAR_MOUNTAIN_FORMATION_AND_ITS_BOUNDING_STRATA Yours, Paul H.
  23. The Confusion Range and the House Range sit in Western Utah. The House Range is farther east closer to Delta, Utah than the Confusion Range. Parts of the Confusion Range are basically on the Utah-Nevada border. Both mountain ranges though have spectacular fossils. The House Range is basically all unfaulted Cambrian age layers and fossils pop up in several of the rock layers there. The Confusion Range, though, is broken up by many faults and everything from the Cambrian to the Triassic is present. Here's a short stratigraphy section marked with the layers we visited. We went to three different sites. A Cambrian site next to U-Dig fossils to sample the Cambrian explosion, and Ordivician site at Fossil Mountain (what better place to find fossils then a mountain named "fossil" mountain) to sample the Great Ordivician Biodiversification Event, and finally a time where 90% of all marine was wiped out, the Permian Period and the Gerster Limestone.
  24. Ordovician: Echinoderm scale?

    Finally, I have a fossil with some geological information associated. This piece is from the lower Ordovician Wah Wah Formation, specifically Section J in the Confusion Mountains in western Utah. I believe it might be an echinoderm scale. I would be thrilled if anyone could verify that and/or add any additional taxonomic information for me. Thank you so very much for your thoughts, and please let me know if you need additional photographs and I will do my best!
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