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Found 75 results

  1. Perenopsis

    Collected on the site of U-Dig near Delta, UT. Personally prepared with a dremel 8220 and Murphy's Oil Soap applied to clean the fossil.
  2. Allosaurus bone fragment?

    I purchased this bone fragment at a fossil show. It's from the Morrison formation of Utah. I suspect it's theropod, most likely Allosaurus because of its hollow nature but I just wanted to get other opinions on it. Thanks everyone!
  3. Elrathia_kingii

    From the album Trilobites

    Taxonomy: Elrathia kingii Age: M. Cambrian Location: Utah (Wheeler Fm) Source: Collected, prepped, and gifted by Jason Rice.
  4. Asaphiscus_Wheeleri

    From the album Trilobites

    Taxonomy: Asaphiscus wheeleri Age: M. Cambrian Location: Utah (Wheeler Fm) Source: Gift from Jason Rice.
  5. Museum of Ancient Life

    Convinced my wife and her family to visit the Museum of Natural History in Lehi, Utah a mere twenty minute drive from my parent-in-laws. This place is amazing and I would highly recommend the trip. I'm posting some pictures now and more later. The view when you first walk in is breathtaking. Massive Quetzalcoatlus above. One of my personal favorites is in the main lobby. A complete Dunkleostus head that has been repaired. Largest armored Placoderm of the Devonian. A closeup of the Dunkleostus. This one is for @GeschWhat Really neat fossils. There's a set of pyritized brachiopods towards the top that looked really good. Belemnites, coprolite, and a fish from Wyoming. Hey it's me! I wish... Really need display of modern paleontologists. I would do anything to dig up a dinosaur of that magnitude. There's a nice Estwing hammer in the middle. One of my favorite parts of the museum is the fossil lab. I had the chance to walk through it a few years ago and will never forget the experience. A Sauropod the team has been working on from Utah. A completed segment of the Sauropod. Sauropod heel. This was massive. Really neat to see all the completed fossils from the laboratory. There's a real live paleontologist! Masked his face to for anonymity. He was working on that vertebrae under the light. Massive Xiphactinus recreation. So glad those aren't around in our lakes and rivers anymore. Giant Diatryma recreation. It's hard to believe these massive carnivorous birds where once the apex predators of the Eocene. The age of the man eating turkeys! Well man wasn't around then but if they were then we would be in trouble. Description of the Diatryma. Another favorite was a recreation of the Megalodon. No museum is complete without one of these. Really brings back memories from Calvert Cliffs. Oh how I am starting to miss Maryland. Great White recreation. Notice the bloated look. Neat description of C. carcharias. One of the ten largest Megalodon teeth ever found. I believe the C. auriculatus are also referred to as Otodus subserratus A personal favorite from the east coast is Hemipristis serra. Another excellent tooth and a favorite of @gavialboy Edestus heinrichi Another personal favorite is the Turritella. Massive Turritella conglomerates. @RJB this one was taken with you in mind. That's a beauty. Top view of a beautiful crab. Fuzzy picture of sea urchin fossils (Echinoderm). Related to starfish and crinoids. C. giganteum A little baby mammoth. So cute.
  6. U-Dig anomaly

    Here is a paradox that was found at U-DIG while searching for trilobites. At first I thought pelecypod but as I started prepping I didn't find a shell. Instead I found it full of small cubes. I didn't take a pre-prep photo but I stopped prepping so you can see the shape and the gray surface. The white cube is one centimeter. Second photo.
  7. Hello, Im traveling from Argentina to photograph the national parks in Utah and tge Grand Canyon and petrified national park. Can someone tell me where I can find some fossiles( obviosly out of nat parks), or soneone who can guide us to fossile sites? Thanks.
  8. I got back last week from a two week collecting trip in Idaho, Utah and Wyoming with my wife and our two friends Bill and Jean. In addition to collecting, sunstones, topaz, agates and fluorescent minerals we collected Cambrian,Silurian, Jurassic, Cretaceous and Eocene fossils. We collected trilobites outside Delta, Utah and Liberty, Idaho, Marine fossils in Emigration and Riley Canyons in Utah and fossil fish in Kemmerer, Wyoming. The results of the trip was 15 boxes shipped home and many hours of preparation ahead of me. My friends came away with 13 boxes of fossils. If anyone wants tips for successful shipping of fossils please PM me as I learned a lot shipping with both USPS and UPS. Perhaps a post about shipping might be valuable. Photots from the trip will be posted at the end. Our first fossil excursion was to U-Dig quarry. Within ten minutes of arriving my friend Bill found a beautiful Asaphiscus wheeleri molt. That was the start to a great day of collecting. By the end of the day my wife and I had a table covered with trimmed examples of all of the common trilobites. The highlights were Bill's Asaphiscus, a huge 2 inch Asaphiscus I found, two brown trilobites and a 1 3/4 Asiphicus my wife found in the discard pile as we were getting ready to leave. We left with four flat rate boxes in total. After collecting in the Delta area for fossils and minerals we went back to our condo in Park City, Utah and visited Emigration Canyon for Jurassic marine fossils in Salt Lake and Riley Canyon, near Jericho, Utah. We found some brachiopods in Emigration Canyon but the fossils were not abundant. Our next stop was Riley Canyon for agatized horn coral. After a hike that resulted in a 3000 foot elevation change from 6000 to 9000 feet we eventually found the horn coral site. It wasn't what I expected. The searching involved looking for loose rock on the mountain among vegetation. While we found pieces of red agate, the agatized horn coral was elusive until my friend Bill found a nive 3 inch horn coral. We continued to search the area with little luck. By the time we left I found one small agatized horn coral and several chuncks. I did find one fossil that was mostly buried in matrix. At the time I thought it was a horn coral but imagine my surprise when I started prepping it and found that it was a large brachiopod. I do want to say that Riley Canyon material is one of the hardest materials I've ever prepped. The matrix is very stick and doesn't want to release from the fossil. It is also extremely difficult to remove with micro-abraision. Our next excursion was to Spence Gulch outside of Liberty, Idaho for Cambrian fossils. Fortunately I had read many different directions to this locality, otherwise we wouldn't have found it. It was a solid miles walk from where we had to abandon our rental vehicle. My wife and I found the matrix at the site to be very similar in consistency and friability to Spring Creek material in Alden, New York. You definitely want to bring cyanoacrylate (super glue) or some other stabilization agent as well as foil to wrap your fossils in so that they dry slowly. Otherwise your prized fossil may be dust by the end of the day. As soon as we arrived at the site I found what looks like a partial Zacanthoides trilobite. By the end of the day our party had found three partials. Bill and I started the morning climbing the slope and excavating pieces where someone had exposed a flat section of rock outcropping. We were rewarded with trilobite pieces and a few hyoliths. We then moved to the base of the outcrop and started splitting small pieces of shale. By the end of the day we found about 20 complete Achlysopsis (at least that's what I think they are). By the end of the day we had a good representation of the Spence Shale. Our last fossil excursion was to Forum member Sseth's fish quarry in Kemmerer, Wyoming. I want to start off by saying that the people working at his quarry are some of the nicest people I have ever met. They were very friendly and always checking in to see if we were having a successful trip. If you ever make it to Kemmerer to collect I have the following pieces of advice. Visit Fossil Butte National Monument Visitors Center first so you know what things look like. Bring boxes and packing material. Bring lots of water. Four people can drink a case of water by early afternoon. Bring sunscreen. Be ready for the dust. You will be covered in dust as will the interior of your rental vehicle or personal vehicle. We had such a good time at Sseth's quarry we actually went back a week later for another day of collecting. We had a lot of fun at his quarry. We came away with many individual fish and several plates of multiples. Most of the fish were larger than three inches and we came away with at least five different species of fish. Our largest fish were a 10 inch Diplomystus my wife and I extracted from a very large rock and an 8 inch Phareodus my friend Bill found in the discard pile splitting discarded rock. While we were there Sseth was excavating a turtle and while excavating it they found a second one. Photos will follow.
  9. Is this a bone fossil?

    Found this in Moab, Utah on a hike a few weeks ago. I am wondering if this is some type of bone fossil or just a rock? It is small, about 1.5 inches by 1 inch.
  10. What is this an Imprint of?

    Found this out in the west desert of Utah, between the small towns of Eureka and Vernon, Utah. I was out rockhounding for some Wonder Stone and found these fossils too. This is one of them. Not sure what this is an imprint of. The exact location was 40*06'36.2"N 112*21'26.3"W (The exact location my Jeep broke down that day!) Thanks!
  11. Does anyone know where I could find a detailed Cedar Mountain Formation of Utah Map?
  12. Lerosey-Aubril, R., & Skabelund, J. (2017) Messorocaris, a new sanctacaridid-like arthropod from the middle Cambrian Wheeler Formation (Utah, USA). Geological Magazine, (ahead-of-print publication) PDF LINK
  13. Utah Plant fossils

    Hi, I am in Utah on vacation and my friends wife wants to find a plant fossil. I bought a guide book but the location in the book was unproductive. Any suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks, Andy
  14. New data for old bones: How the famous Cleveland-Lloyd dinosaur bone bed came to be June 6, 2017 https://phys.org/news/2017-06-bones-famous-cleveland-lloyd-dinosaur-bone.html Joseph E. Peterson, Jonathan P. Warnock, Shawn L. Eberhart, Steven R. Clawson & Christopher R. Noto (2017) New data towards the development of a comprehensive taphonomic framework for the Late Jurassic Cleveland-Lloyd Dinosaur Quarry, Central Utah. PeerJ 5:e3368 doi: https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.3368 https://peerj.com/articles/3368/ Yours, Paul H.
  15. Elrathia kingii

    Collected on a field trip to U-Dig Utah and prepared at the U-Dig site station. After a light mechanical brush exposed the shale, mineral oil was applied with another brush for a polished finish.
  16. Coprolite ID

    Hello from Southern California I was going through my garage and found, what I was told is Coprolite, that I bought at a little rock shop in Zion Utah. I bought this about 16 years ago, and it was a "display" used for displaying other coprolites. Can anyone confirm this?
  17. Hi, I'm new here. I found this interesting Nanosaurus Rex skull for sale. The Seller says it is from Emery, Utah and he says it is real. Sorry for my English because I am from China. Please help me identify if this real. Thanks!
  18. Margaretia dorus no longer an alga?

    I guess I have another label to redo: https://bmcbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12915-016-0271-4
  19. A new specimen of Eolambia caroljonesa is described in this new paper. It's the most abundant dinosaur in the Cedar Mountain Formation of Utah. Osteology of the Basal Hadrosauroid Eolambia caroljonesa (Dinosauria: Ornithopoda) from the Cedar Mountain Formation of Utah Andrew T. McDonald , John Bird, James I. Kirkland, Peter Dodson http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0176896 Nice photo of a theropod provisionally called Siats meekerorum which was found in the vicinity of the E. Caroljonesa
  20. Hi there, I bought a hadrosaur caudal vertebra online a while ago and I was wondering what genus/species it is? It is from Southeastern Utah - I'm not sure which formation, the seller didn't say. Just joined up and would appreciate any help or suggestions! Thank you!
  21. These are a few of the pdf files (and a few Microsoft Word documents) that I've accumulated in my web browsing. MOST of these are hyperlinked to their source. If you want one that is not hyperlinked or if the link isn't working, e-mail me at joegallo1954@gmail.com and I'll be happy to send it to you. Please note that this list will be updated continuously as I find more available resources. All of these files are freely available on the Internet so there should be no copyright issues. Articles with author names in RED are new additions since April 29, 2017. United States Faunas, Localities and Stratigraphy (by State) Utah Utah - Cambrian Brett, C.E., et al. (2009). Sequence stratigraphy, cyclic facies, and lagerstätten in the Middle Cambrian Wheeler and Marjum Formations, Great Basin, Utah. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 277. Gaines, R.R., M.J. Kennedy and M.L. Droser (2005). A new hypothesis for organic preservation of Burgess Shale taxa in the middle Cambrian Wheeler Formation, House Range, Utah. Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 220. Garson, D.E., et al. (2011). Dynamic palaeoredox and exceptional preservation in the Cambrian Spence Shale of Utah. Lethaia. Gunther, L.F. and V.G. Gunther (1981). Some Middle Cambrian Fossils of Utah. Brigham Young University Geology Studies, Vol.28, Part 1. Hintze, L.F. and A.R. Palmer (1976). Upper Cambrian Orr Formation: Its Subdivisions and Correlatives in Western Utah. U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1405-G. McCollum, L.B. and D.M. Miller (1991). Cambrian Stratigraphy of the Wendover Area, Utah and Nevada. U.S. Geological Survey Bulletin 1948. Morris, S.C. and R.A. Robison (1988). More Soft-Bodied Animals and Algae from the Middle Cambrian of Utah and British Columbia. The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions, Paper 122. Morris, S.C., et al. (2015). New records of Burgess Shale-type taxa from the middle Cambrian of Utah. Journal of Paleontology. Utah - Devonian Denison, R.H. (1952). Early Devonian Fishes from Utah: Part I. Osteostraci. Fieldiana: Geology, Vol.11, Number 6. Utah - Carboniferous Arnold, C.A. and W. Sadlick (1962). A Mississippian Flora from Northeastern Utah and its Faunal and Stratigraphic Relations.Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.XVII, Number 11. Girty, G.H. (1910). The Fauna of the Phosphate Beds of the Park City Formation in Idaho, Wyoming and Utah. United States Geological Survey, Bulletin 436. Utah - Triassic Martz, J.W., R.B. Irmis and A.R.C. Milner (2014). Lithostratigraphy and Biostratigraphy of the Chinle Formation (Upper Triassic) in Southern Lisbon Valley, Southeastern Utah. In: Geology of Utah's Far South. McLean, J.S., R.F. Biek and J.E. Huntoon (eds.), Utah Geological Association, Publication 43. Utah - Jurassic Charette, E.K. Taphonomy and paleoecology of a Middle Jurassic fossil assemblage, Carmel Formation, southwest Utah. Milner, A.R.C. and J.I. Kirkland (2006). Preliminary Review of the Early Jurassic (Hettangian) Freshwater Lake Dixie Fish Fauna in the Whitmore Point Member, Moenave Formation in Southwest Utah. In: The Triassic-Jurassic Terrestrial Transition. Harris, et al. (eds.), New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 37. Utah - Cretaceous Eaton, J.G. (2006). Late Cretaceous Mammals from Cedar Canyon, Southwestern Utah. In: Late Cretaceous vertebrates from the Western Interior. (Lucas, S.G. and R.M.Sullivan, eds.) New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 35. Garrison, J.R., et al. (2007). A multidisciplinary study of the Lower Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Mussentuchit Wash, Utah: a determination of the paleoenvironment and paleoecology of the Eolambia caroljonesa dinosaur quarry. Cretaceous Research, 28. Kirkland, J.L. Utah's Newly Recognized Dinosaur Record from the Early Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation. Survey Notes. Kirkland, J.L. and S.K. Madsen (2007). The Lower Cretaceous Cedar Mountain Formation, Eastern Utah: The View Up An Always Interesting Learning Curve. Utah Geological Association Publication 35. Kirkland, J.L., et al. (1999). Distribution of Vertebrate Faunas in the Cedar Mountain Formation, East-Central Utah. Utah Geological Society, Miscellaneous Publication 99-1. Utah - Paleocene Cifelli, R.L., N.J. Czaplewski and K.D. Rose (1995). Additions to Knowledge of Paleocene Mammals from the North Horn Formation, Central Utah. Great Basin Naturalist, 55(3). Utah - Eocene Eaton, J.G., et al. (1999). Vertebrates of the Turtle Basin Local Fauna, Middle Eocene, Sevier Plateau, South-Central Utah. In: Vertebrate paleontology in Utah, Gilette, D.D. (ed.), Utah Geological Survey Miscellaneous Publication 99-1. Kelly, T.S., P.C. Murphey and S.L. Walsh (2012). New Records of Small Mammals from the Middle Eocene Duchesne River Formation, Utah, and Their Implications for the Uintan-Duchesnean North American Land Mammal Age Transition. Paludicola, 8(4). Murphey, P.C., et al. (2011). Paleontology and stratigraphy of middle Eocene rock units in the Bridger and Uinta Basins, Wyoming and Utah. The Geological Society of America, Field Guide 21. Utah - Pleistocene Liggett, G.A. and M.E. Nelson (1993). Vertebrate Taphonomy of the Blonquist Rock Shelter (Pleistocene-Holocene), Summit County, Utah: A Case for Raptoral Accumulation of Bones. The Compass, 70(3). Utah - General Gillette, D.D. (ed.)(1999). Vertebrate Paleontology in Utah. Utah Geological Survey, Miscellaneous Publication 99-1. (568 pages, 57.4MB download) Hintze, L.F. (1973). Geologic Road Logs of Western Utah and Eastern Nevada. Brigham Young University Geology Studies, Vol.20, Part 2. Studies for Students Number 7. Milner, A.R.C. and S.Z. Spears (2007). Mesozoic and Cenozoic Paleoichnology of Southwestern Utah. Geological Society of America - Rocky Mountain Section Annual Meeting. Powell, D.K. (1958). The Geology of the Southern House Range, Millard County, Utah. Masters Thesis - Brigham Young University. Vermont Doll, C.G. (1984). Fossils from the Metamorphic Rocks of the Silurian-Devonian Magog Belt in Northern Vermont. Vermont Geology, Vol.3. Howe, J. (1993). A Brief Fossil History of Vermont. Landing, E., S.R. Westrop and L. Van Aller Hernick (2003). Uppermost Cambrian-Lower Ordovician Faunas and Laurentian Platform Sequence Stratigraphy, Eastern New York and Vermont. J.Paleont., 77(1). Mehrtens, C.J. and A.C.H. Hadley (1995). Stratigraphy and Bedrock Geology of Parts of the St. Albans and Georgia Quadrangles, Northwestern Vermont. Vermont Geological Survey, Special Bulletin Number 14. Mehrtens, C.J. and M.A. Borre (1989). Stratigraphy and Bedrock Geology of Parts of the Colchester and Georgia Plains Quadrangles, Northwestern Vermont. Vermont Geological Survey, Special Bulletin Number 11. Stone, S.W. and J.G. Dennis (1964). The Geology of the Milton Quadrangle, Vermont. Vermont Geological Survey, Bulletin Number 26. Taylor, J.F., et al. (1991). Uppermost Cambrian Slope Deposits at Highgate Gorge, Vermont: A Minor Miscorrelation With Major Consequences for Conodont- and Trilobite-Based Chronocorrelation. J.Paleont., 65(5). Vermont Geological Survey (2007). Rockhounding in Vermont. Welby, C.W. (1962). Paleontology of the Champlain Basin in Vermont. Vermont Geological Survey, Special Publication Number 1. Virginia American Geophysical Union (1989). Tertiary Stratigraphy and Paleontology, Chesapeake Bay Region, Virginia and Maryland. Field Trip Guidebook T216, 28th International Geological Congress. Campbell, L.D. (1993). Pliocene Molluscs from the Yorktown and Chowan River Formations in Virginia. Virginia Division of Mineral Resources, Publication 127. (Thanks to doushantuo for finding this one!). Dooley, A.C. (2007). Barstovian (middle Miocene) Land Mammals from the Carmel Church Quarry, Caroline County, Virginia. Jeffersoniana, Number 18. Hibbard, D.A. and F. Grady (2001). Melrose Caverns: A Late Pleistocene Vertebrate Locality in Virginia, U.S.A. Speleo Brazil, 2001. Lea, H.C. (1846). Description of Some New Fossil Shells from the Tertiary of Petersburg, Va. Liutkus-Pierce, C.M., N.C. Fraser and A.B. Heckert (2014). Stratigraphy, sedimentology, and paleontology of the Upper Triassic Solite Quarry, North Carolina and Virginia. The Geological Society of America, Field Guide 35. Mixon, R.B. (ed.)(1989). Geology and Paleontology of the Haynesville Cores - Northeastern Virginia Coastal Plain. United States Geological Survey, Professional Paper 1489. Rader, E.K. (1964). Guide to Fossil Collecting in Virginia.Virginia Division of Mineral Resources, Information Circular 7 (Digital Reprint). Read, C.B. (1955). Floras of the Pocono Formation and Price Sandstone in Parts of Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia. United States Geological Society Professional Paper 263. Richards, H.G. and L. Campbell (1972). Additional Pleistocene Mollusks of Virginia. Virginia Minerals, Vol.18, Number 2. Sartain, R.R. (1981). Stratigraphy and Conodont Paleontology of Late Silurian-Early Devonian Strata of Western Virginia. Masters Thesis - Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. (154 pages) Trochim, A.R. and A.C. Dooley (2010). Diatom biostratigraphy and paleoecology of vertebrate-bearing Miocene localities in Virginia. Jeffersoniana, Number 23. Ward, L. W. and K. Kraft (eds.)(1984). Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Outcropping Tertiary Beds in the Pamunkey River Region, Central Virginia Coastal Plain. Atlantic Coastal Plain Geological Association Guidebook for 1984 Field Trip. Weems, R.E. (1993). Stratigraphic Distribution and Bibliography of Fossil Fish, Amphibians and Reptiles from Virginia. United States Geological Survey, Open-File Report Number 93-222. Weems, R.E. and R.A. George (2013). Amphibians and Nonmarine Turtles from the Miocene Calvert Formation of Delaware, Maryland and Virginia (USA). Journal of Paleontology, 87(4). Weems, R.E. and G.J. Grimsley (eds.)(1999). Early Eocene Vertebrates and Plants from the Fisher/Sullivan Site (Nanjemoy Formation), Stafford County, Virginia. Virginia Division of Natural Resources, Publication 152. Washington Archibald, S.B., et al. (2010). Lagerstätten of the Okanagan Highlands (British Columbia and Washington): emergent communities in Early Eocene climates. GeoCanada 2010 - Working with the Earth. Bader, N.E., et al. (2016). 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The Nonmammalian Vertebrate Microfossil Assemblages of the Mesaverde Formation (Upper Cretaceous, Campanian) of the Wind River and Bighorn Basins, Wyoming. In: Late Cretaceous vertebrates from the Western Interior. (Lucas, S.G. and R.M.Sullivan, eds.) New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science Bulletin 35. Dorr, J.A. (1985). Newfound Early Cretaceous Dinosaurs and Other Fossils in Southeastern Idaho and Westernmost Wyoming. Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.27, Number 3. Eicher, D.L. (1960). Stratigraphy and Micropaleontology of the Thermopolis Shale. Peabody Museum of Natural History - Yale University, Bulletin 15. Ostrom, J.H. (1970). Stratigraphy and Paleontology of the Cloverly Formation (Lower Cretaceous) of the Bighorn Basin Area, Wyoming and Montana. Bulletin of the Peabody Museum of Natural History, Bull. 55. Wyoming - Paleocene Anemone, R.L. and W. Dirks (2009). An anachronistic Clarkforkian mammal fauna from the Paleocene Fort Union Formation (Great Divide Basin, Wyoming, USA). Geologica Acta, Vol.17, Numbers 1-2. Bown, T.M., et al. (1994). Distribution and Stratigraphic Correlation of Upper Paleocene and Lower Eocene Fossil Mammal and Plant Localities of the Fort Union, Willwood, and Tatman Formations, Southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1540. Gazin, C.L. (1969). A New Occurrence of Paleocene Mammals in the Evanston Formation, Southwestern Wyoming. Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology, Number 2. Gingerich, P.D. (2003). Mammalian responses to climate change at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary: Polecat Bench record in the northern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. Geological Society of America, Special Paper 369. Gingerich, P.D. (2016). Paleocene faunal evolution at Polecat Bench in the northern Bighorn Basin of Wyoming, USA. Vertebrata PalAsiatica, 54(3). Gingerich, P.D. (ed.) (2001). Paleocene - Eocene Stratigraphy and Biotic Change in the Bighorn and Clarks Fork Basins, Wyoming. University of Michigan Papers on Paleontology, Number 33. Gingerich, P.D. (1983). Paleocene-Eocene Faunal Zones and a Preliminary Analysis of Laramide Structural Deformation in the Clark's Fork Basin, Wyoming. Wyoming Geological Association Guidebook. Gingerich, P.D. and T. Smith (2006). Paleocene-Eocene Land Mammals from Three New Latest Clarkforkian and Earliest Wasatchian Wash Sites at Polecat Bench in the Northern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming.Contributions from the Museum of Paleontology - The University of Michigan, Vol.31, Number 11. Gingerich, P.D. and W.C. Clyde (2001). Overview of Mammalian Biostratigraphy in the Paleocene-Eocene Fort Union and Willwood Formations of the Bighorn and Clarks Fork Basins. In: Paleocene-Eocene Stratigraphy and Biotic Change in the Bighorn and Clarks Fork Basins, Wyoming. Gingerich, P.D. (ed.), University of Michigan Papers on Paleontology, 33. Gingerich, P.D. and K. Klitz (1985). Paleocene and early Eocene fossil localities in the Fort Union and Willwood Formations, Clarks Fork Basin, Wyoming (map). University of Michigan, Miscellaneous Papers, Number 61. Higgins, P. (2003). A Wyoming succession of Paleocene mammal-bearing localities bracketing the boundary between the Torrejonian and Tiffanian North American Land Mammal "Ages".Rocky Mountain Geology, Vol.38, Number 2. Holroyd, P.A. and B.D. Rankin (2014). Additions to the latest Paleocene Buckman Hollow local fauna, Chappo Member of the Wasatch Formation, Lincoln County, southwestern Wyoming. Palaeontologia Electronica, Vol.17, Issue 1. Secord, R. (2008). The Tiffanian Land-Mammal Age (Middle and Late Paleocene) in the Northern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. University of Michigan Papers on Paleontology, Number 35. (60.5MB download) Secord, R., et al. (2006). Geochronology and Mammalian Biostratigraphy of Middle and Upper Paleocene Continental Strata, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. American Journal of Science, Vol.306. Wegemann, C.H. (1917). Wasatch Fossils in So-Called Fort Union Beds of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. United States Geological Survey, Professional Paper 108-D. Wilf, P., et al. (1998). Portrait of a Late Paleocene (Early Clarkforkian) Terrestrial Ecosystem: Big Multi Quarry and Associated Strata, Washakie Basin, Southwestern Wyoming. Palaios, Vol.13. Wyoming - Eocene Bown, T.M., et al. (1994). Distribution and Stratigraphic Correlation of Upper Paleocene and Lower Eocene Fossil Mammal and Plant Localities of the Fort Union, Willwood, and Tatman Formations, Southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming. U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1540. Delson, E. (1971). Fossil Mammals of the Early Wasatchian Powder River Local Fauna, Eocene of Northeast Wyoming.Bulletin of the American Museum of Natural History, Volume 146: Article 4. Dorr, J.A. (1969). Mammalian and Other Fossils, Early Eocene Pass Peak Formation, Central Western Wyoming. 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  22. This is a trip report (with photos) I wrote with my husband about a road trip we did last spring to dig for trilobites in southern Utah. We just wanted to share the info now that it is spring again! https://nomads-expeditions.blog/2016/05/26/digging-for-fossils-in-utah/
  23. Hi fellow Forum members. My wife and I are planning a collecting trip to Utah, Idaho and Wyoming the last week of June and first week of July. We have a condo in Park City. This will probably be a one time trip so we want to make the most of it. So far we have added U-Dig in Antelope Springs, Utah, and are planning on visiting Spence Gulch in Idaho. We are also looking at fossil fish collecting in Wyoming. My question is this; 1) Can anyone recommend other collecting localities in Utah for trilobites and/or Gogia? 2) Does anyone know if the Riley Canyon agatized horn coral site is still worthwhile? 2) There are several pay quarries in Kemmerer, Wyoming to collect fossil fish. Any thoughts on the best location to go? 3) Does anyone have more detailed directions for finding Spence Gulch in Idaho? I have a Google Earth map but am not sure how accurate it is. 4) Is there someplace we just shouldn't miss? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks, Andy
  24. Allosaurus tooth

    From the album Nigel's album

    Bone traces above tooth were exposed by myself. Tooth was removed, cleaned and re-fixed by others.
  25. Green river Utah

    Hi I have read about the green river fossil formation in eastern Utah. Has anyone ever been there? Where is it and can you collect? thanks
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