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Found 139 results

  1. Triassic Pterosaur Found in Utah

    200-million year old Pterosaur 'built for flying' August 13, 2018 by Marlowe Hood, PhysOrg https://phys.org/news/2018-08-million-year-pterosaur-built.html Rare Desert Pterosaur Fossil Discovered in Utah The rare Triassic fossil is the most complete early pterosaur ever found, and gives new insight into the evolution of the first flying vertebrates By Jason Daley, Smithsonian Magazine, Aug. 14, 2018 https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/rare-desert-pterosaur-fossil-discovered-utah-180969995/ Oldest pterodactyl fossil discovered in Utah desert Doyle Rice, USA TODAY, Aug. 13, 2018 https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/science/2018/08/13/fossil-oldest-pterodactyl-discovered-utah-desert/977979002/ Brooks B. Britt et al. Caelestiventus hanseni gen. et sp. nov. extends the desert-dwelling pterosaur record back 65 million years, Nature Ecology & Evolution (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41559-018-0627 https://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-018-0627-y Yours, Paul H.
  2. Here's a few things I've learned about the best marine fossil sites. All the right ingredients need to come together in one spot for a great fossil site to come together. But I know there's much more than what I've listed below. So I was hoping other people could add to my list and correct anything they see that's amiss. I figure if your going to search for fossils, you might as well go with the best ideas in hand. All the right ingredients typically found at a good Marine Fossil site: * High elevation limestone shale cliffs, high elevation hill country or areas around ancient seabeds. *Marine rocks in the area like limestone, basalt, dolomite , loess, silica. *Excessive iron presence, magnesium, sulfur and copper carbon ore in the area is ideal. *Presence of certain minerals like bertheirine and calcium carbonates. *Evidence of trace fossils on the surface so you don't waste time digging in the wrong spot. * Mud stone, clay, coral formations, or coral rocks. * Rocks with flow lines, water marks, algae or microorganism markings. *Evidence of oxidation or oxidized rocks. Ross P. Anderson, Nicholas J. Tosca, Robert R. Gaines, Nicolás Mongiardino Koch, Derek E.G. Briggs. A mineralogical signature for Burgess Shale–type fossilization. Geology, 2018; DOI: 10.1130/G39941.1
  3. A lot going on with this fossil.

    The first two pics are of a fossil I found w/ a front and back view. I found them in a fossil bed in the Oquirrh Mts. (Ut) There's a lot of trace fossils on this one, so it may be impossible to id them all. Any thoughts would be much appreciated. The 3rd & 4th pictures are of a similar fossil found in the same fossil bed w/ a front and a back view as well.
  4. From a friend in Utah

    A friend gave these to me and said his mother Found them years ago when they lived in Utah. Other than that I have no idea of their origin. Any help in Identification would be greatly appreciated.
  5. So I've had a hankering for some Precambrian fossils. In Utah, according to this article, there is cyanobacteria fossils present in Utah. Does anybody have any examples of Cyanobacteria fossils that they'd like to show the world so I can have an idea what I'm looking for? If you know anything extra about localities or examples of the Red Pine Shale fossils and don't want to share with everybody we can PM. I'm just trying to get a feel for them before I head out. Thanks.
  6. A tough one

    Im wondering if its even possible to get species information on this one. Part of the estate that I have posted other fossils from. Possibly at least an i.d on what bone this is anatomically would be better than the information I have now. Written on the fossil says "Utah, Jurassic". Those are your clues. Weight: 2.5 kg Length: 7 inch Width: 5.75 in
  7. Road trip fossil hunting

    Hey everyone! My brother and I are doing a bit of driving today and we're looking for places to stop and stretch out out legs and hunt fossils. Were driving through Moab, Utah, on to Durango, Colorado, through Pagosa Springs, down towards Taos, and towards Red River. Anyone have any suggestions?
  8. Utah dinosaur bone. Further classification?

    So this is a piece of dinosaur bone from Utah USA. Unfortunately thats all that came with it. Is it possible to know any further classification of this bone? It was kinda hard to photograph the microscope, my apologies. Also if you want more pictures just ask cause i can only fit 2 here due to limitations. Thanks -Tom
  9. ATrip to Wyoming

    Hello, I’m a new member and a novice fossil hunter. I’m headed on a trip thru Colorado, to southwest Wyoming, and then down southern Utah. I know about the pay sites in Wyoming, does anyone have any suggestions fossil sites from central thru northwest Colorado, and eastern Utah. Sorry if this is a pretty broad question.
  10. I have a surplus of fossils from Utah and Wyoming. From UT I have a bunch of Elrathia and Asaphiscus trilobites. From Wyoming fossil fish mainly Knightia but I do have one Mioplosus. What I'm looking for are trilobites outside of Utah, ammonites, and shark teeth or any other kind of tooth such as Therapod, Cetacean, crocodile, etc. Here's a picture of some of the fossils. I also have some Chesapecten from Maryland sitting in my desk drawers.
  11. Can someone please help me know if this "dinosaur egg" that I found in Utah is truly a dinosaur egg?
  12. A New Ankylosaurid from Utah

    A partial ankylosaurid skeleton from the upper Campanian Kaiparowits Formation of southern Utah is recognized as a new taxon, Akainacephalus johnsoni. The new taxon documents the first record of an associated ankylosaurid skull and postcranial skeleton from the Kaiparowits Formation. A good reference paper to aid in identification of ankylosaurid bones https://peerj.com/articles/5016/
  13. Go west

    Hey all. Going out to Vernal UT at the end of the week. Spending a couple of days there, doing Dinosaur National Monument, then a week near Boulder CO. Would love any suggestions of places to hunt while I'm out there. Will also be visiting Florissant and Morrison. Trying desperately to squeeze an extra day to get up to Kemmerer WY to find some fishes!
  14. Found this looking for yellow cat redwood last week! It looks like real bark!
  15. Fossil eye!

    Odd looking.... Probably not an eye, but any ideas as to what it is? Found in yellow cat flats utah
  16. Oyster Looking rock

    The person who owned my home before me left quite a rock collection around my yard. I seriously thought this was a cow patty when I first saw it. But upon closer examination it was just a weird, oyster shaped rock in a grey limestone like clay. It has shell casings around a few of the ridges and seems to have an oyster like shape. It also has small clear crystals that crust some of the ridges and crystalline matter mixed into the grey sludge clay its encased in. It weighs a lot, so I didn't think this was a fossil, but a friend who has more experience with fossils thinks its a fossil. I might upload some better pics later after I charge my camera.
  17. Fossilized worms

    I'm new on this site and have a few fossilized rocks that I need to ID. This first rock (from Tooele County Utah) looks to have fossilized worms on it. My town of Tooele sits on the ancient dry remains of Lake Bonneville, so I'm always finding rocks with shells and fossils. The rock has some florescent properties, but I think this maybe due to the saturated caliche in the soil (not sure though).
  18. Fossil or Modern?

    So we found this vertebra(?) among a few coral and shell fossils (including a tiny starfish!) and we weren't sure whether this was actually a fossil or not (or even a vertebra). It was all in some exposed shale. I don't know much about fossil identification, but I can't seem to find anything that matches this. Here is a link to the location of the site: https://goo.gl/maps/qCGeKFBv85z I googled different animals currently in the region and there is nothing that I can find that matches. It's roughly 1 x 1 x 2 inches (sorry for no scale).
  19. Weird reptile-like mammal species discovered amid ancient Utah dinosaur bones by David DeMille, USA Today, The Spectrum, May 30, 2018 https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2018/05/30/reptile-mammal-species-fossil-utah-pangea/654547002/ Scientists discover the fossilized skull of a mammal-like critter under a dinosaur’s foot in Utah — and then it gets even weirder, The Salt Lake Tribune, May 30, 2018 https://www.sltrib.com/news/education/2018/05/29/scientists-discover-the-fossilized-skull-of-a-mammal-like-critter-under-a-dinosaurs-foot-in-utah-and-then-it-gets-even-weirder/ Why you should care about this 130-million-year-old fossil The ancient find, unearthed in Utah, bridges the transition from reptiles to the beginning of mammals and changes our view of continental drift, too By Zen Vuong, USC News, May 23, 2018 https://news.usc.edu/143411/why-you-should-care-about-this-130-million-year-old-fossil/ The this paper is: Adam K. Huttenlocker; David M. Grossnickle; James I. Kirkland; Julia A. Schultz; Zhe-Xi Luo (2018). "Late-surviving stem mammal links the lowermost Cretaceous of North America and Gondwana". Nature. in press. doi:10.1038/s41586-018-0126-y. Yours, Paul H.
  20. Some years ago I found this among the red rocks just beyond Zion National Park. I thought it was a stone with erosion and wore it around my neck until someone told me it was a petrified bone. I took it to a place in NYC that specializes in fossils and they told me to go to the Museum of Natural History because they could not identify it but definitely thought it was something. I thought I should let you guys take a crack at it. Photos are of two sides with the second side showing a distinct darkness around the putative foramen. I have additional photos. I am new at this and appreciate any insights or thoughts. Thank-you! Dimensions: Length: 3.25" (8.5 cm) Width: 1.25" (3.0 cm) Thickness: 0.25" (app. 0.5 cm) Foramen: 0.25" (app. 0.5cm)
  21. https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/23/science/haramiyid-skull-utah.html https://phys.org/news/2018-05-utah-fossil-reveals-global-exodus.html
  22. gastrolith 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Gastrolith Utah Jurassic Period (199.6 to 145.5 million years ago) A gastrolith, also called a stomach stone or gizzard stones, is a rock held inside a gastrointestinal tract. Gastroliths in some species are retained in the muscular gizzard and used to grind food in animals lacking suitable grinding teeth. In other species the rocks are ingested and pass through the digestive system and are frequently replaced. The grain size depends upon the size of the animal and the gastrolith's role in digestion. Other species use gastroliths as ballast. Particles ranging in size from sand to cobbles have been documented. Some extinct animals such as sauropod dinosaurs appear to have used stones to grind tough plant matter. A rare example of this is the Early Cretaceous theropod Caudipteryx zoui from northeastern China, which was discovered with a series of small stones, interpreted as gastroliths, in the area of its skeleton that would have corresponded with its abdominal region. Aquatic animals, such as plesiosaurs, may have used them as ballast, to help balance themselves or to decrease their buoyancy, as crocodiles do.
  23. gastrolith 1.jpg

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Gastrolith Utah Jurassic Period (199.6 to 145.5 million years ago) A gastrolith, also called a stomach stone or gizzard stones, is a rock held inside a gastrointestinal tract. Gastroliths in some species are retained in the muscular gizzard and used to grind food in animals lacking suitable grinding teeth. In other species the rocks are ingested and pass through the digestive system and are frequently replaced. The grain size depends upon the size of the animal and the gastrolith's role in digestion. Other species use gastroliths as ballast. Particles ranging in size from sand to cobbles have been documented. Some extinct animals such as sauropod dinosaurs appear to have used stones to grind tough plant matter. A rare example of this is the Early Cretaceous theropod Caudipteryx zoui from northeastern China, which was discovered with a series of small stones, interpreted as gastroliths, in the area of its skeleton that would have corresponded with its abdominal region. Aquatic animals, such as plesiosaurs, may have used them as ballast, to help balance themselves or to decrease their buoyancy, as crocodiles do.
  24. Odd shaped rock in my garden

    Hello! first post here. I know very little about fossils but I found this peculiar rock in my garden and thought it looked like an old vertebrae. Location is Salt Lake City, although it could have been put in the garden by the previous owners. It’s a heavy rock, about 7x7 inches. I apologize if I am leaving out any important details! Cheers, m
  25. SALT LAKE CITY — Visitors at a Utah state park have been dislodging dinosaur tracks imprinted in sandstone and throwing the pieces into a nearby lake, officials said. https://www.rgj.com/story/life/outdoors/2018/05/08/dinosaur-tracks-utah-park-dislodged-thrown-into-lake/590535002/
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