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Found 232 results

  1. I have Elrathia kingii, Itagnostus interstrictus, and Acrothele subsidua. Also, rare rock and mineral from California, eclogite and benitoite..
  2. These are very tiny, delicate, fibrous/filamentous structures which are most commonly found within an iron-oxidized (? yellow/orange tinted) hash. They are probably part of something bigger, like maybe the fibrous structure of highly degraded algae. These are really hard to photograph with what I have. Again, 3ach circular shot 9mm+wide.
  3. I need your opinions, please. Burrows, I think.
  4. Don’t know what this is

  5. I just received this "phyllocarid" valve from the Marjum Formation (Middle Cambrian) of Utah. It was sold as Canadaspis perfecta. It measures about 1" long and 3/4" tall. Although I don't have a compass, the angles between the hinge line and both the anterior and posterior margins of the valve look to be less than 100 degrees. Several papers I've read state that these angles are usually closer 120 in Canadaspis. Any thoughts on what this might be?
  6. First of all, apologies for the image quality. I know flash can be pretty horrid but it's all I can do at the moment. Side-views will be found in the following posts! I collected this (probably molted) trilo at Marjum pass in Utah a few weeks ago. The depth of the axial lobe and how the pleurae seem to flare up led me to believe that this specimen is on its back. I only have a pin vise at my disposal and I don't want to ruin a good specimen with the incorrect equipment, but I wondered if anyone has heard of pin-vising Marjum shale. Would you use air abrasion? In that case I will save it for a few years when I can afford it (: Thanks for reading, hope everyone's staying safe!
  7. Insect Wing Fossil

    My 7 year old rockhound son found this rock after I tilled up my garden bed and he’s convinced it has a fossil or two in it. After looking at it with him, I agree but honestly I’m not very knowledgeable in this area. I’m hoping some of you experts might be able to help him ID them if they are fossils. We live in The Uintah Basin, UT where lots of dinosaur bones have been found. Thank you for looking!
  8. Morrison Formation yields remains of predatory insect. Utah State Parks Blog, Vernal, Utah https://stateparks.utah.gov/2020/05/20/famous-dinosaur-producing-rocks-in-utah-yield-fossil-of-large-predatory-insect/ Jurassic bug: Researchers find 151-million-year-old Morrisonnepa Jurassica insect fossil in Utah by Jordan Culver, USA TODAY, May 22, 2020 https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2020/05/21/morrisonnepa-jurassica-151-million-year-old-bug-fossil-utah/5234187002/ the paper is: Lara, M.B., Foster, J.R., Kirkland, J.I. and Howells, T.F., 2020. First fossil true water bugs (Heteroptera, Nepomorpha) from Upper Jurassic strata of North America (Morrison Formation, southeastern Utah). Historical Biology, pp.1-9. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/08912963.2020.1755283 Yours, Paul H.
  9. Some of you may have seen my ammonite donation. If not and you are curious it is linked here: It is an important player in this trip. Anyway I thought I might describe my first trip to this locality and why you might realize it is a little more rare than the normal finds there. Some of this is part of a poster for the now cancelled Rocky Mountain Section of the Geological Society of America so if I ever do get to put my poster online I will post a link here so you guys can look at it too. For now here is a trip report.
  10. I was doing some research on the ordovician cruziana plates I found in Millard Co, Utah a few years ago and noticed something funny. It seems that similar looking specimens from around the world are frequently the same pink color. In my experience pink fossils are rare. But, it seems pink cruziana is not. Google the cruziana found at Penha Garcia park in Portugal for example. Any thoughts as to why? Here are some pictures of mine.
  11. Trilo ID help please?

    Hi Everyone I found this Trilo in the scree on the shoulders of Fossil Mountain in Utah about 7 years ago. I have looked for its source higher up on the mountain the last few times I went there and could never find another. Can anyone ID it? It is the biggest and most intact specimen I have ever found at that site and would be curious to know what it is. Thanks for your help.
  12. Tracking Traces of Permian Coast Life

    Here is a short trip to keep those of us still in quarantine entertained. I collected this before our quarantine started. Something I have wanted for a while ever since seeing one but was not able to collect was in my trip through Utah's Paleozoic (link here: ) is a trace fossil called Skolithos. For those without much experience with trace fossils, Skolithos is a vertical tubelike burrow in sand on a sandy high-energy beach. The little critters would have to dig relatively deep vertical burrows so that they weren't washed away the next time a storm rolled through. A common name for this particular trace fossil is “piperock” because the number burrows could get dense enough in one area that the rock looks a bundle of straws. Just like a lot of trace fossils, it is not certain what made these burrows but it is known that it probably went extinct at the end of the Cretaceous as there are not any specimens after the dinosaurs’ doomsday. My particular specimen is made of calcareous sandstone that has been slightly metamorphosed into a quartzite. It is most likely from the Lower Permian of the Oquirrh Group based on the location and the nearby rock formation it appeared to have fallen out of but I found it in a gravel pile from the shoreline of Lake Bonneville so the exact stratigraphy is unknown.
  13. Uranium Mineralization of Fossil Wood

    Mustoe, G.E., 2020. Uranium Mineralization of Fossil Wood. Geosciences (Switzerland) 10(4):1-25 https://www.researchgate.net/publication/340609903_Uranium_Mineralization_of_Fossil_Wood https://www.mdpi.com/2076-3263/10/4/133 Yours, Paul H.
  14. Good afternoon folks. I have what was identified as a Sauropod coprolite (1 of 5) from the Morrison Formation, Henry Mountains, Wayne County, Hanksville, Utah. Jurassic period (Per the seller's description). I purchased this back in 2000 and am requesting a verification so I can ensure my ID card is correct. All help is appreciated. Measurements are 8.5Cm W, 6.0Cm H, 4.5Cm D.
  15. A new Eocene bird species has been discovered in the Uinta Formation in the Uinta Basin of Utah. Dubbed informally as the Uintan paraortygid (yet to be formally named), this bird species lived about 44 mya and belongs to a family of extinct birds known as Paraortygidae that are related to living Galliformes (like chickens, turkeys & quails) and fossils from this group have been found in Europe, Asia, Africa & North America. The species is know from a coracoid bone. The authors state that these small ground-dwelling birds may have been competing with early mammals for resources http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/uintan-paraortygid-08189.html https://www.mdpi.com/1424-2818/12/3/90 (Stidham, Townsend & Holroyd., 2020)
  16. Two of my weeks formation trilobites, will show more in a few days. Order.: PTYCHOPARIIDA Family.: LLANOASPIDIDAE Gen.: Genevievella, LOCHMAN, 1936 Rare trilobite with a large characteristic spine starting from the 7th axial ring. LINK: http://www.backtothepast.com.mx/ebonino/html/weeks_trilobites_1.html#Genevievella
  17. I'll start by saying I'm not looking for anyone's honey hole, but if you want to share please private message me. I'll be in Florida (Tampa/Venice mostly) with my family (coming from Utah) in late July/early August. Had hoped to hit up the Peace but I've heard it's no good because the water is high. I have 3 kids who love to fossil hunt and dig around for treasures so I'm disappointed that the Peace won't work out. What I want to know is if there are any safe spots in smaller creeks that I can access (legally) during that time of year and bring my kids for a few hours? Rather not do any guided trips, but would be ok to pay to access someone's land. We did the beach stuff (caspersen, manasota) last year and now looking to try our hand on a creek. Would be happy to give some tips on Utah spots in exchange for any info. Thanks.
  18. Never would’ve thought that geiger counter (or some other machine like one) would be used when collecting fossil! Anyway, here’s the link: https://www.livescience.com/amp/new-allosaurus-dinosaur.html Enjoy!
  19. Strange 'martian' mineral mounds rise up from Utah's Great Salt Lake By Tom Metcalfe https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/energy-environment/rare-salt-formations-appear-along-the-great-salt-lake/2020/01/10/5b581e9c-33e5-11ea-971b-43bec3ff9860_story.html https://www.space.com/martian-mineral-mounds-rise-utah-salt-lake.html https://www.lite1065.com/2020/01/16/rare-martian-mineral-mounds-appear-in-utahs-great-salt-lake/ What rare environmental mounds at Great Salt Lake could teach us about Mars. Utah geologists document spring mounds for first time By Amy Joi O'Donoghue, Deseret News, January 7, 2020 https://www.deseret.com/utah/2020/1/7/21055472/great-salt-lake-rare-environmental-mounds-could-teach-us-about-mars Other publications: Schubert, B.A., Lowenstein, T.K. and Timofeeff, M.N., 2009. Microscopic identification of prokaryotes in modern and ancient halite, Saline Valley and Death Valley, California. Astrobiology, 9(5), pp.467-482. http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.714.5959&rep=rep1&type=pdf https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/14ac/33a1fb626040f3019947bfe95903ebe46d99.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  20. I just received confirmation from Professor Steven R. Manchester, Curator of Paleobotany Florida Museum of Natural History, that I do in fact have Bonanzacarpum sprungerorum! Special thanks to doushantuo's post (additions to paleocarpological knowledge:The Eocene) that restarted my identification quest and Paleoflor for encouraging me to pursue it. And TTF for giving me the venue to request identification assistance.
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