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Found 252 results

  1. Ichthyosaur vertebra

    From the album Holzmaden

    A 2.5 cm long Ichthyosaur vertebra from the quarry Kromer near Holzmaden (Lower Jurassic, Posidonia Shale). Here is a picture of the unprepped cross section: It took about 3 hours to prep this one. Some more pictures:
  2. Hop 5 03/02/19

    1. Isurus desori: Awesome Mako, just shy of two inches. One of my largest teeth from Bayfront Park. Found within 10 or 15 minutes of stepping foot on the beach. 2. Notorynchus primigenius: Very nice cow shark tooth. Small ding on the first cusp, but mostly complete and a decent size. 3. Cetacean Vertebra: My first whale vert! This lumbar vertebra was completely buried in the sand, with only the very top exposed. 4. Hemipristis serra: Really cool snaggletooth with nice colors and perfect serrations. Could be either an upper or lower, hard to tell. Most likely upper. 5. Cetacean Vertebra: Another whale vert! This one is an atlas vert, and like the first was found almost completely buried. Very much intact, maybe even museum quality. Please cast your vote! The poll ends at 1:00 p.m. EST. Also, if you haven't already, be sure to check out my YouTube video so you can see these fossils as they were found! The link to the video is in my most recent trip report, titled "Bayfront Park 03/02/19: First YouTube Video"
  3. Found vertebra(?)

    Hi guys, I joined so I could identify what I found! I was walking on the beach in southern Maine when I stumbled upon this circular disk. I think it’s a vertebra, but I was wondering if someone could tell me the difference between shark and fish vertebra. Any info is helpful!! It’s so interesting. thumb nail for size!
  4. Mastodonsaurus sp. (Jaeger 1828)

    From the album Vertebrates (other than fish)

    Vertebra. 2cm. long Middle Triassic Ladinian Grenz Bonebed Upper Muschelkalk Found at Zwingelhausen
  5. Mini Miocene Marine Mammal

    I found this a few days ago along the Virginia side of the Potomac River along a miocene cliff. It's mostly if not all Choptank formation. Any ideas about a genus? Grid is in inches. Looks like maybe mature dolphin tailbone, but it's so small???
  6. Large Whale Bone to Stabilize

    I found this beautiful whale vertebra this weekend. It fell out of the cliff face just a few days ago and tumbled into the Potomac River (brackish?) just far enough for the waves at the tide line to gently lapped it clean. Gotta love it! It is currently soaking in clean water to get the salt and anything else out as much as I can, but I've never done anything this big before. I'm used to stabilizing little stuff and blocks of matrix that really just need a thick, hard outer shell. The little bones air dry quickly enough that I don't have to worry about moisture at the center, but this thing is 4 1/2 inches in diameter! I have both Paleobond and Paraloid on hand. Anyone have any practice at this?
  7. Hi everyone, Im looking at a bunch of stuff that someone got from the big fossil expo this month, but I want to be sure of what is what before I do anything. There's a few things way beyond what I could potentially get, but I'm just curious about in general. These are all Moroccan, and most, if not all, are Kem Kem. are these first 4 pics spinosaur? With the teeth I know the 2 on the top&left are probably carchar teeth, but I'm wondering about the other 2. In the 2nd picture, I'm guessing the right one is a spinosaur vert, right? What about the other one? I'm sure it would probably be very hard to tell with just a single rib, but could the rib be spinosaurus? It seems to match some museum spino skeleton ribs, but that's the best I can figure out:/
  8. Mammal vert

    This may be a long shot. Can anyone I’d this vert I found on the Brazos River in Texas?
  9. Hell Creek Vertebra ID

    Looking for a little help identifying this Hell Creek vertebra I purchased a few years ago. I bought it off an individual with lots of experience hunting in Hell Creek, but unfortunately he had no idea what it might be from. Any help would be much appreciated!
  10. Nothosaur vertebra

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A 3.5 cm long Nothosaur vertebra from a triassic "Bonebed" in a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg). The prep work was kinda hard, because the stone is extremely hard and the fossil is very fragile. So I think it took about 3 hours. Here is a picture of the unprepped fossil: And finished: As you can see I decided to restore a bit, but nevertheless I am satisfied with the result
  11. When I first set out to collect Dinosaur fossils, a fossil dealer with a long history in the industry and from whom I had purchased shark fossils from had this listed for sale. It was sold as a Troodon formosus ( I am aware it is an invalid taxon). When I committed to purchasing this, i was unaware that only Troodontid teeth had been found in Hell Creek and I tended to believe dealer ID's. I do not regret the purchase. It is a great little bone to have in our education program and it was not expensive. We want to cover Troodontids in our education program which is why I bought this. It was cheaper than a tooth. It was also a good lesson to learn early on and without a significant financial investment. I do my homework know before purchasing a dinosaur fossil and if I have questions, I put it here. It seems unlikely that that the dealer ID is correct just based on the lack of Troodontid bones that come from Hell Creek. I want to know we have and be accurate in what we present to kids so I have put some effort into figuring this out. It is a very small vertebra as you can see in the pictures. I did find some small theropod caudal vertebrae that look similar including a Troodontid. I have done some homework on this and tried to figure it out but I can not get much further on my own. All I can say for sure is that is does not appear to be a fish or mammal and I do not think it is a crocodilian either. Any thoughts or information would be helpful !!
  12. Rapp Creek hunting

    Spent extra time looking for a spot, wandered the creek trying holes (not so deep). A few spots that looked spectacular and virtually a wall of shells yielded nothing. Most spots where there were loose shells in the creek also had small teeth (mostly broken sand tiger, nothing spectacular or big). Overall lots of teeth, but quality was not great. My "best" spots required a lot of digging. But the weather was nice, Spring-like and it was a pleasant hunt. Found ten or so drum teeth, three ecphora (one small one is complete), four angel shark teeth, a tooth in matrix (I don't see many of those, fine serrations), badly broken cowshark, four vertebra-- all different. Most of the triangular bull shark/ dusky/ gray shark teeth I find have fine serrations, two today had pronounced (including the biggest tooth), but not as striking as the usual hemipristis(?). Found a tiger shark tooth, much more common on the beaches. So still looking for a good spot, lot of digging ahead, but a good problem to have.
  13. A friend of mine spotted this on the beach at Belmar, NJ yesterday February 2nd. This is kind of an unusual locale, adjacent to the jetty at Shark River Inlet where the Shark River meets the Atlantic. In the past my buddy and I have found small beachworn fossil shark teeth at this spot, so we thought for old time's sake we'd take a quick look again. We didn't find any teeth (there's much less fine gravel there now than in the past) but he did find this, which is way bigger than anything we've found here before. I have some guesses but I would like other eyes on this too in case I'm missing something obvious. Thanks in advance
  14. Nothosaur vertebra

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A 4 cm long Nothosaur vertebra from a triassic "Bonebed" in a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg): A picture of the unprepped vertebra: After a bit of prep: And finished:
  15. Kem Kem vert ID

    Can anyone ID this please? The groove on the side has me puzzled.
  16. Nothosaur vertebra

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A Nothosaur vertebra from a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg). Its from a thin layer where you can find many bones and teeth from various animals (a triassic Bonebed). I found this one in 2018 but I finished prepping in this month. Its my biggest Nothosaur vertebra until now with a length of a little bit more than 6 cm. Overall the prep work took about 4 hours. A picture of the unprepped fossil: And prepped:
  17. Big vertebra

    My friend has found a lot of fossils, but he doesn't know what they are. This one is some sort of vertebra. My friend found it in south africa. (Scale in cm)
  18. Found on Myrtle Beach. No idea what it is or whether it's worth keeping! Ideas?
  19. Identification and age of Vertebra

    This bone was found at Isla Blanca Park on South Padre Island about 2 months ago. Could you please help me identify what it is and age? I am a sheller and I am finding some fossils lately and I don't know anything about them, so I really appreciate any help. Thanks so much. (I am calling this a caudal because that is the guess my brother made)
  20. Nothosaur vertebra

    From the album Triassic vertebrate fossils

    A 5 cm long Nothosaur vertebra from a triassic "Bonebed" in a quarry in southern Germany (Baden-Württemberg). This one is kinda fragile so the prep work was hard. I often give up and tried it another time again. Here is an older state: And another picture of the current state:
  21. My girlfriend recently found this vertebra at the Duck Creek Formation in North Texas. Was a bit of a surprise, didn't expect to find a vert at this locality, which is known more for ammonites, echinoids, and bivalves. One side of the vert has been prepped. Any help with an ID would be greatly appreciated. Thanks! And for those that have kindly enhanced the brightness on my previous pics, no worries! I did it myself this time.
  22. Reindeer vertebra

    From the album @Max-fossils 's Zandmotor Finds

    A reindeer, Rangifer tarandus, vertebra found on the Zandmotor, about 40'000 years old ("Mammoth-steppe" period, in the Late Pleistocene). It seems to have been bleached by the sun (most bones on the Zandmotor are darker than this).
  23. Thescelosaurus Caudal (?) Vertebra (pt.1)

    From the album Lance fm. Microsite Finds

    Thescelosaurus neglectus Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian~ 66 mya) Lance formation
  24. NSR Shark Vertebra reverse

    From the album North Sulfur River

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