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Found 188 results

  1. The winner of the June 2020 VFOTM goes to... Placoderm fish (Cowralepis mclachlani) - ~385 Ma (Middle Devonian); Merriganowry Shale Member of the Dulladerry Volcanics - Central West NSW, Australia Congratulations to @Paleoworld-101 !!!
  2. Mystery Jawbone

    Found on the Brazos River just southwest of Houston. When I first saw it I almost left it behind as it looked modern at a glance. The jawbone is definitely mineralized, however, but unfortunately its missing the teeth it used to contain as it's only one side of the whole bone. My best guess is that its a fragment of an alligator jaw based on the round tooth cavities and the way they're spaced apart, but if anyone more knowledgable then me could give a suggestion, that would be great.
  3. Shark Tooth Found

    I found this tooth at my normal overburden site, at work, it is the best shark tooth i have even found. Looking at Shark tooth I.D guides my guess is that this is a Auriculatus tooth. What do you all think?
  4. Placoderm material from New York?

    Found this nice slate blue piece in my recent trip to Western New York. What do you guys think? The piece isn’t very big, maybe half an inch - but it looks relatively thick, maybe a centimeter and a half?
  5. Check the entries below carefully and cast your vote! PM me if you notice any errors with the entries. The poll ends July 9th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE 1. Placoderm fish (Cowralepis mclachlani) - ~385 Ma (Middle Devonian); Merriganowry Shale Member of the Dulladerry Volcanics - Central West NSW, Australia 2. Conodont assemblage (possibly articulated) - Excello Shale Member, Carbondale Formation (~310 Ma, Middle Pennsylvanian) - LaSalle County, Illinois 3. Conodont S segment (Gondolella sp?) - Pennsylvanian, Stark Shale Member - Kansas City, Missouri 4. Columbian Mammoth neonatal (possible prenatal) tooth - Pleistocene, Bone Valley - Florida 5. Ptychodus cf. decurrens hybodont shark tooth - Cretaceous, Cenomanian - Cap-Blanc-Nez, France 6. Eugeneodontida (possibly Caseodus sp.) shark teeth (associated teeth with cartilage/skin impressions) - Upper Pennsylvanian, Stark Shale Member - Jackson County, Missouri 7. Bos primigenius (bison) skull - Pleistocene - Góra Kalwaria, Poland
  6. Texas City Dike Bison Tooth?

    One of the only fossils I managed to find at the Texas City dike this weekend, which is well-known as a site for Pleistocene fossils from the Beaumont Clay formation that are pulled to the surface during dredging operations in the nearby shipping channel. I know this tooth isn't Equus, so maybe bison? Any help would be appreciated!
  7. Texas Pleistocene Rib Bones

    I was searching the gravel bars in the Brazos River just southeast of Houston almost every day last week before the storm hit this weekend. Now the water's too high to look, but I found a pretty good assortment of fossilized Pleistocene aged bones during my trips. Most of what I've found have been fragments that are totally unidentifiable, but a handful still have some significant features that could lead to an ID. These two are both rib bones, but that's about all I know. The first one I initially thought was from a modern cow due to how clean it was, but after picking it up it was clear that it's definitely a fossil - it's mineralized all the way through and has a decent weight to it. The only animals of that size that could produce such a large rib that I can think of off the top of my head would be either bison or hoses. The second bone also looks like a rib, but a lot smaller than the first. It has two deep grooves on either side that seem to match up with pictures I've seen of the origin point in deer and horse ribs where the bone begins to branch away from the vertebral column. As always, any help would be appreciated!
  8. Below are some online PDF files of the now defunct, but still famous, the Leisey Shell Pit in southwest florida. Leisey Shell Pit 1A, University of Florida Vertebrate Fossil Locality HI007 https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/florida-vertebrate-fossils/sites/leisey-shell-pit-1a/ https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/100years/leisey-shell-pit-fossils/ Hulbert, Jr., R.C., Morgan, G.S. and Webb S.D., eds., 1995. Paleontology and Geology of the Leisey Shell Pits, Early Pleistocene of Florida. Bulletin Florida Museum of Natural History, 37 (Part I). https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/bulletin/publications/ https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095791/00001 https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095791/00002/allvolumes Hulbert, Jr., R.C., Morgan, G.S. and Webb S.D., eds., 1995. Paleontology and Geology of the Leisey Shell Pits, Early Pleistocene of Florida. Bulletin Florida Museum of Natural History, 37 (Part II). https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/bulletin/publications/ https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095791/00002 https://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00095791/00002/allvolumes Hulbert, R.C. and Morgan, G., 1989. Stratigraphy, paleoecology, and vertebrate fauna of the Leisey Shell Pit Local Fauna, early Pleistocene (Irvingtonian) of southwestern Florida. Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/313657536_Stratigraphy_paleoecology_and_vertebrate_fauna_of_the_Leisey_Shell_Pit_Local_Fauna_early_Pleistocene_Irvingtonian_of_southwestern_Florida http://floridapaleosociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/Papers-in-Florida-Paleontology-2-July-1989.pdf Portell, R.W. and Kittle, B., 2010. Mollusca: Bermont Formation (middle Pleistocene). Florida Fossil Invertebrates, 13, pp.1-40. http://floridapaleosociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/02/FFI-13.pdf Kittle, B., and Portell, R.W., 2010. Mollusca: Fort Thompson Formation (middle Pleistocene). Florida Fossil Invertebrates, 13, pp.1-40. http://floridapaleosociety.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/FFI-12.pdf Morgan, G.S. and Hulbert Jr, R.C., 1995. Overview of the geology and vertebrate biochronology of the Leisey Shell Pit local fauna, Hillsborough County, Florida. Bulletin of the Florida Museum of Natural History, 37(1), pp.1-92. https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/files/7114/7180/9327/Vol-37-Part_1-No-1.pdf https://www.researchgate.net/publication/257620521_Overview_of_the_geology_and_vertebrate_biochronology_of_the_Leisey_Shell_Pit_Local_Fauna_Hillsborough_County_Florida https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Richard_Hulbert Taphonomy of the terrestrial mammals of Leisey Shell Pit 1A, Hillsborough County, Florida https://www.researchgate.net/publication/306429620_Taphonomy_of_the_terrestrial_mammals_of_Leisey_Shell_Pit_1A_Hillsborough_County_Florida https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Richard_Hulbert As lagniappe, there is also an online PDF of a guidebook to Cretaceous-Cenozoic Floras and Landscapes of Southeastern Australia. It is: First International Palaeontological Congress: Pre-Congress Fieldtrip 1: Cretaceous-Cenozoic Floras and Landscapes of Southeastern Australia https://www.researchgate.net/publication/233747871_Cretaceous-Cenozoic_Floras_and_Landscapes_of_Southeastern_Australia https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Stephen_Mcloughlin/2 https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Stephen_Mcloughlin/ Yours, Paul H.
  9. Jurassic toe claw

    Bony core present. Much of keratin sheath preserved as creamy green. Bottom has distinct flattened profile and the keratin is heavily fractured (see picture - toe2 left edge, toe3 right edge) Top profile exhibits clockwise curve. Jurassic, Morrison, Four Corners.
  10. Unknown fossil (tooth?)

    This is a post hurricane beach find. I picked up a number of mammal teeth, bone, scute, and stone artifacts on the trip. Assumed this was a tooth when I picked it up but unlike any I have ever seen before.
  11. The winner of the May 2020 VFOTM goes to... Triceratops prorsus right dentary - Upper Hell Creek Formation, Upper Cretaceous - Powder River County, Montana Congratulations to @Troodon !!!
  12. Found in an outcrop of the Dino Park Formation in Alberta. 1. First 4 pics - not sure what this is? It's thick and dense though 2. Next 3 pics - maybe an atlas or axial vertebrae of something? 3. Next 1 pic - scute or turtle shell plate? 4. Next 3 pics - Ceratopsian brow horn?
  13. Mudstones?

    Hello all- I live in NC, the far Western part, but spend a lot of time in TN, at a man-made lake that was constructed as part of the TVA project, beginning in the 30s. The rocks and scenery around there have been stirred up and relocated with the construction of the lake, so it’s kind of difficult to say what ought to be where. That said, they consist mostly of rather uninteresting dolomite and quartzite in the forested areas, and then huge beach expanses of orange-tan to red to purple and even bluish clay-type slate or shale material that has hardened in spots to near-rock consistency. There are beautiful agates to be found in some banks of red clay, however, and there are also enormous, opaque, gray mudstones with intriguing shapes. I thought at first that the mudstones were some of the most boring-looking things I’d ever seen, with the utter lack of variation in their color, as if painted in dull, chalky gray, but that has changed. After attending several summers of lake recreation, I noticed that the rocks were becoming much more interesting, and paid more attention to them. It seemed that the mudstone was sloughing off of itself at a considerable rate, and that the materials that formed the center of the nodules were becoming exposed! The mudstone is gritty and slips off with repeated exposure to bioturbation, (I believe this is the correct term for tumbling by elements, no?), and as time passes, more and more fascinating things are turning up. Not all of the nodules contain a center item, but many do. Following a bit of research, I located this article: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/0031018281900572 ...and some others that also describe fossils being found in the middle of such mudstone formations. What really surprised me was how identical to my setting the soils and rocks sounded in the article... Here are some photos of things that have come from the mudstones... Anyone have any thoughts on what these could be?
  14. Check the entries below carefully and cast your vote! PM me if you notice any errors with the entries. The poll ends June 9th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE 1. Triceratops prorsus right dentary - Upper Hell Creek Formation, Upper Cretaceous - Powder River County, Montana 2. Pseudotertrasauropus footprint - Late Triassic, Redonda Formation - Quay County, New Mexico 3. cf. Nemacanthus hybodont shark spine - Rhaetian, Triassic, Westbury Formation - Somerset, UK 4. Gondolella sp. conodont replacement toothlets (pokal cell cones) - Stark Shale Member, Pennsylvanian - Kansas City, Missouri 5. Cretodus sp. shark tooth - Eagle Ford Group/Atco Formation, Late Cretaceous (86-92 Ma) - North Texas
  15. The winner of the April 2020 VFOTM goes to... Platecarpus mosasaur - Cretaceous, Taylor Group, Ozan Formation - North Sulphur River, Texas Congratulations to @Searcher !!!
  16. Check the entries below carefully and cast your vote! PM me if you notice any errors with the entries. The poll ends May 9th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE 1. Petalodus ohioensis shark tooth - Carboniferous, Conemaugh Group, Glenshaw Formation, Brush Creek Limestone - Pennsylvania 2. Platecarpus mosasaur - Cretaceous, Taylor Group, Ozan Formation - North Sulphur River, Texas 3. Peripristis semicircularis petalodont shark tooth - Pennsylvanian - Coleman County, Texas 4. Carcharocles angustidens shark tooth - Oglocene (35-22 Ma) - Jacksonville, North Carolina 5. Carcharocles megalodon shark tooth - Miocene, Round Mountain Silt - Bakersfield, California 6. Glikmanius occidentalis shark tooth - Geologic Age or Geologic Formation: Carboniferous, La Salle Limestone Member of the Bond Formation - La Salle County, Illinois
  17. fossil,legality,regulations

    The Confuciusornis Sanctus_ An Examination of Chinese Cultural Pr.pdf The Confuciusornis Sanctus: An Examination of Chinese Cultural Property Law and Policy in Action Anne Carlisle Schmidt Recommended Citation Anne C. Schmidt, The Confuciusornis Sanctus: An Examination of Chinese Cultural Property Law and Policy in Action , 23 B.C. Int'l & Comp. L. Rev. 185 (2000), for those who wonder: Boston Comparative International and Comparative LAw Review
  18. The winner of the March 2020 VFOTM goes to... Primate jaw with teeth - Bridgerian, Middle Eocene - Blue Rim, Wyoming Congratulations to @jpc !!!
  19. Check the entries below carefully and cast your vote! PM me if you notice any errors with the entries. The poll ends April 9th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE 1. Articulated prearticular dentition of undetermined pycnodont (bony fish) - Turonian, Late Cretaceous - Seine-Maritime, France 2. Thecachampsa sp. (crocodylian) vertebra - Chesapeake Group, Choptank FM? - Calvert County, Maryland 3. Hybodont shark tooth (cf. Hybodus or Planohybodus) - Bathonian, Jurassic, Forest Marble Formation - Watton Cliff, Dorset, England 4. Hadrosaur (Edmontosaurus annectens) juvenile right dentary - Hell Creek Formation, Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) - Harding County, South Dakota 5. Ichthyosaur tail section, with femur and scattered paddle bones - Mulgrave Shale (Bituminous Shales), Toarcian, Jurassic - Whitby, North Yorkshire, England 6. Unknown Cretaceous fish - Late Cretaceous - North Sulphur River, Texas 7. Ichthyosaurus communis two articulated vertebrae - Charmouth Mudstone Formation, Jurassic - Dorset, England 8. Primate jaw with teeth - Bridgerian, Middle Eocene - Blue Rim, Wyoming
  20. This nifty little gem turned up in my sifter yesterday (Peace River, Bone Valley formation, Hawthorn group, Hardee county, Gardner Florida). I have no idea what it is. All of these little mammal teeth look the same to me. I tried to take the best photos of it that I could, but it's small and tough to get the crown in focus, but I think I managed it...maybe. Does anyone know what animal this comes from? Thanks in advance!
  21. The winner of the February 2020 VFOTM goes to... Diprotodontid pelvis (likely Zygomaturus trilobus) - Pleistocene - Queensland, Australia Congratulations to @Ash !!!
  22. I found this today in the Ripley Formation (Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) of ne Mississippi. Am I right in thinking it’s a fish vertebral element? Which one? and if so, why the mushroom top? Coin is 19 mm in diameter.
  23. Check the entries below carefully and cast your vote! PM me if you notice any errors with the entries. The poll ends March 9th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE 1. Tylosaurus proriger jaw section with replacement tooth - Upper Cretaceous, Ozan Formation - North Sulphur River, Texas 2. Diprotodontid pelvis (likely Zygomaturus trilobus) - Pleistocene - Queensland, Australia 3. Unknown fish with seven visible vertebrae and covered in scales - Upper Cretaceous, Ozan Formation - North Sulphur River, Texas
  24. The winner of the January 2020 VFOTM goes to... Bird (Species unknown) - Eocene (52 Ma) - American Fossil Quarry, Wyoming Congratulations to @sseth!!!
  25. Last year's Hell Creek finds

    Here are some of the better finds from my digging trip in South Dakota last year. First up is what is likely an osteoderm from Ankylosaurus. This specimen is gone for research. I've got a "stupid rookie" story to go along with this if anyone is interested. Next is a section of Edmontosaurus rib with the head and part of the main. This still needs final cleaning and consolidation. I'm still debating whether to leave them separate or re-create the missing portion and join them. This is the largest and most complete ossified Edmontosaurus tail tendon I have seen. Most of the time you only find little 1 inch sections. This one is completed prep, retaining some of the matrix and a random BOB, as dug. Nice chunk of turtle shell. I have a love/hate relationship with these. This is one is large and quite thick. Most of them are extremely thin and fragile as egg shell. Still needs final prep and consolidation. Unfortunately its a covered in CA, which is making it so much harder. A very nice Tricerotops tooth that my son recovered. He is like a magnet for these large trike teeth. This is the 3rd big one he's found. All I find are tiny spitters. This is a juvenile T-Rex tooth, found beside the Ed rib. This one is gone for research. There's also a small nano-T tooth missing its tip, and a large BOB which I think could be a bit of Trike frill. No pics of those available at this moment. I'll have to add them later.
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