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  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 165 results

  1. The winner of the January 2020 VFOTM goes to... Bird (Species unknown) - Eocene (52 Ma) - American Fossil Quarry, Wyoming Congratulations to @sseth!!!
  2. Last year's Hell Creek finds

    Here are some of the better finds from my digging trip in South Dakota last year. First up is what is likely an osteoderm from Ankylosaurus. This specimen is gone for research. I've got a "stupid rookie" story to go along with this if anyone is interested. Next is a section of Edmontosaurus rib with the head and part of the main. This still needs final cleaning and consolidation. I'm still debating whether to leave them separate or re-create the missing portion and join them. This is the largest and most complete ossified Edmontosaurus tail tendon I have seen. Most of the time you only find little 1 inch sections. This one is completed prep, retaining some of the matrix and a random BOB, as dug. Nice chunk of turtle shell. I have a love/hate relationship with these. This is one is large and quite thick. Most of them are extremely thin and fragile as egg shell. Still needs final prep and consolidation. Unfortunately its a covered in CA, which is making it so much harder. A very nice Tricerotops tooth that my son recovered. He is like a magnet for these large trike teeth. This is the 3rd big one he's found. All I find are tiny spitters. This is a juvenile T-Rex tooth, found beside the Ed rib. This one is gone for research. There's also a small nano-T tooth missing its tip, and a large BOB which I think could be a bit of Trike frill. No pics of those available at this moment. I'll have to add them later.
  3. Check the entries below carefully and cast your vote! PM me if you notice any errors with the entries. The poll ends February 9th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE 1. Rauisuchian indet. - Late Triassic, Bull Canyon Formation - Quay County, New Mexico 2. Rooted Mosasaur Tooth - Navarro Group, Cretaceous (75-66 Ma) - Northeast Texas 3. Bison priscus vertebra - Pleistocene - Góra Kalwaria, Poland 4. Bird (Species unknown) - Eocene (52 Ma) - American Fossil Quarry, Wyoming 5. Giant Manta (Mobula [Manta] birostris) vestigial tooth - Tamiami Formation?, Plio/Pleistocene? - "Cookiecutter Creek", Florida
  4. 2019 VERTEBRATE FOSSIL OF THE YEAR (VFOTY) Ichthyosaurus sp. (possibly I. communis) - Jurassic (Hettangian) - circa 190 MYA - Preplanobis Beds, Lavernock Point, UK Congratulations to @Welsh Wizard !!!
  5. The winner of the December 2019 VFOTM goes to... Palorchestes sp. (azael?) marsupial - Pleistocene - Queensland, Australia Congratulations to @Jesuslover340!!!
  6. Check the entries below carefully and cast your vote! PM me if you notice any errors with the entries. The poll ends January 9th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE 1. Notorynchus cepedianus shark (upper tooth) - Neogene - Antwerp, Belgium 2. Speonesydrion lungfish prearticular plate - Emsian, Early Devonian - Nikanciai Village, Siauliai District, Northern Lithuania 3. Amioid scale of bowfin relative Caturus - Triassic - Ketvergiai Quarry, Klaipeda District, Western Lithuania 4. Tylosaurus mosasaur tooth - Cretaceous, Ozan Formation - Texas 5. Carcharocles chubutensis shark tooth - Miocene, Burdigalian - Sesimbra, Portugal 6. Chilomycterus sp. (aka. Burrfish lower mouthplate) - Miocene-Pliocene - Savannah River, Savannah, Georgia 7. Cockerelites liops fish - Eocene, Green River Formation - Lincoln County, Wyoming 8. Shark vertebrae - Miocene, Burdigalian - Sesimbra, Portugal 9. Palorchestes sp. (azael?) marsupial - Pleistocene - Queensland, Australia 10. Baleen whale partial skull - Greta Formation, 2.5 million years old (Nukumaruan stage) - North Canterbury, New Zealand 11. Moa tarsometatarsus bone - Pleistocene - North Canterbury, New Zealand
  7. pterosaurs,diet,coprolites

    here size:about 11 MB Filter feeding in Late Jurassic pterosaurs supported by coprolite contents Martin Qvarnström, Erik Elgh, Krzysztof Owocki, Per E. Ahlberg, Grzegorz Niedźwiedzki
  8. The winner of the November 2019 VFOTM goes to... Small Fish jaw with teeth (unknown species) - Jet Rock or Alum Shale Series, Upper Lias, Jurassic - Whitby, North Yorkshire Coast, England Congratulations to @LiamL !!!
  9. ---

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  10. cretaceous,USA,Pisces

    A new large Late Cretaceous lamniform shark from North America, with comments on the taxonomy, paleoecology, and evolution of the genus Cretodus Kenshu Shimada &Michael J. Everhart Article: e1673399 | Received 30 Nov 2018, Accepted 09 Sep 2019, Published online: 18 Nov 2019 LINK (description of Cretodus houghtonorum n.sp) edit:5,30 MB,or thereabouts relevant: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Containing Papers of a Biological Character Vol. 210 (1921), pp. 311-407 V I I I .— On the Calcification o f the Vertebral Centra in Sharks and Rays. B y W . G. R id e w o o d, D.Sc. 18 MB!!
  11. Check the entries below carefully and cast your vote! PM me if you notice any errors with the entries. The poll ends December 9th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE 1. Ptyktoptychion sp. chimaeroid right vomerine tooth - Cretaceous, Toolebuc Formation - Central Queensland, Australia 2. Abelisauridae indet tooth and partial Onchopristis numbais rostral barb - Aoufous Formation, Kem Kem Beds, Cenomanian, Cretaceous - Morocco 3. Carcharodon carcharias (Great White Shark) tooth - Beach Find Likely Pliocene/Late Miocene - North Myrtle Beach, South Carolina 4. Small Fish jaw with teeth (unknown species) - Jet Rock or Alum Shale Series, Upper Lias, Jurassic - Whitby, North Yorkshire Coast, England 5. cf. Cimolodon sp. (multituberculate mammal tooth) - Late Cretaceous, Maastrichtian (~66 Ma), Lance Fm - Wyoming
  12. The winner of the October 2019 IPFOTM goes to... Mammuthus primigenius, woolly mammoth molar - Weichselian, late Pleistocene (40 Ka) - Zandmotor, Netherlands (dredged from North Sea) Congratulations to @Max-fossils !!!
  13. ID Request Vertebrate

    Hello, can anyone tell me which species this vertebrate belongs to? I'm sorry I don't have much information other than it came from the 2009 Tucson Gem & Mineral Show.
  14. Check the entries below carefully and cast your vote! PM me if you notice any errors with the entries. The poll ends November 9th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE 1. Cymatodus oblongus chondrichthyan tooth - LaSalle Limestone Member of the Bond Formation (Pennsylvanian) - Oglesby, Illinois 2. Knightia eocaena fish multi-plate - Green River Formation, Eocene - Lincoln County, Wyoming 3. Great White Shark (Carcharodon carcharias) tooth - Miocene - Charleston County, South Carolina 4. Giant ground sloth, family Mylodontidae - Pleistocene - Southeast Texas 5. Petalodus ohioensis chondrichthyan tooth - LaSalle Limestone member of the Pennsylvanian Bond Formation - Oglesby, LaSalle County, Illinois 6. Mammuthus primigenius, woolly mammoth molar - Weichselian, late Pleistocene (40 Ka) - Zandmotor, Netherlands (dredged from North Sea) 7. Ichthyosaur vertebrae (2 fused one single) - Whitby Mudstone Formation, Lower Jurassic - Yorkshire Coast, Whitby, England 8. Ichthyosaurus sp. pterygoid bone - Lower Jurassic, Hettangian (200 Ma) - Penarth, South Glamorgan, Wales, UK 9. Ichthyosaur rostrum - Blue Lias Formation, Jurassic - Lavernock, South Wales, UK
  15. New Study on Tully Monster

    New study on Tully Monster "the findings suggest Tullimonstrum could have been an invertebrate" https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2019/10/300-million-year-old-tully-monster-may-not-be-creature-scientists-thought-it-was
  16. The winner of the September 2019 VFOTM goes to... Upper and lower peccary jaw section - Miocene, opal bearing bentonite clay layer - Royal Peacock Opal Mine, Humboldt County, Nevada Congratulations to @JBMugu !!!
  17. A few weeks back the Paleontological Society of Austin went out on one of our monthly field trips. The weather was still quite warm and we decided to keep it closer to home so no one would be to wrung out when we were done. We are hopefully at the tail end of a rather brutal drought with constant triple digit temps that started back in June. We picked three sites within 90 minutes of Austin that took us up thru the Glen Rose Formation, bottom to top. We started at a site in the Lower Member known as the micro zone. Fossils big enough to see from a standing position are few but if you get down and crawl around you can be rewarded with a crazy variety of tiny echinoids, starfish and crinoids and other odd bits in amongst the usual molluscs. The second site was at the very top of the Lower Member in the Salenia texana zone and folks found their share. But it was the last stop way up in Unit 7 of the Upper Member that I found my keeper* for the day. I had collected this site over the years and knew it as good for small echinoids and on occasion ammonites. But I was going back with some fresh information provided by the local researcher William Rader. Bill Rader had informed me that the site produced vertebrate material including many years before a crocodile scute. When we got there I spent time in the ammonite zone and helping others find fossils but it was at the tail end of the afternoon as I was thinking about the drive home that I moved to some lower layers that generally just produce common molluscs. AND BAM! Bones... Now I just assumed they were turtle which isn't uncommon in the Glen Rose but always a good find. I found two of the pieces within inches and they fit together. Jamie Shelton was there and I called her over to help me scan the spot with an extra set of eyes. I found a third piece before we quit. The next day was Identification Day at Texas Memorial Museum and PSA was manning the invertebrate table. But I knew there would be a few vertebrate specialists as well. As the day wound down I found a moment to show them to Chris Sagebiel of UT. He wasn't quite sure at first but when I mentioned that croc material was known from the site he immediately thought that it was a match. * Chris asked what I was planning on doing with the specimen (nudge nudge) and I agreed it should go to the Vertebrate lab here at UT. Here are some pics of the bones and a few from the day.
  18. Bull Canyon Formation

    Here are some of my Bull Canyon Formation fossils from New Mexico.
  19. Check the entries below carefully and cast your vote! PM me if you notice any errors with the entries. The poll ends October 9th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE 1. Upper and lower peccary jaw section - Miocene, opal bearing bentonite clay layer - Royal Peacock Opal Mine, Humboldt County, Nevada 2. Lungfish scale (Dipnoi indet.) - Late Emsian-Eifelian (Middle Devonian) - Juodikiai Quarry, Klaipeda District, Western Lithuania 3. Glyptopomus tetrapodomorph fish skull fragment - Late Famennian (Uppermost Devonian) - Juodikiai Quarry, Klaipeda District, Western Lithuania 4. Diplomystus dentatus and Knightia eocaena - Eocene, Green River Formation, 18" Layer - Lincoln County, Wyoming 5. Protostega gigas sea turtle costal bone with partial rib head - Late Cretaceous - North Sulphur River, Texas 6. Unidentified fish jaw and scattering - Whitby Mudstone Formation - Yorkshire coast, near Whitby England 7. 12 unidentified associated dolphin teeth - Miocene - Sarasota county, Florida
  20. Mystery bone

    So, this is my first post here, and I have what I imagine might be an unusual case for this forum. I work for a travelling dinosaur exhibit, setting up a display of real fossils. Within the last year, our owners purchased a number of dinosaur fossils from a dealer (ie, an acquaintance of theirs) and shipped them to our CEO's home, who later sent them to our company's repair shop to have travel cases built, before shipping them to our show on the road. Somewhere in all of that, some of the fossils' original information was lost. I reached out to our executives who promised to look into it and get back to me, but naturally, they would forget, I would remind them, they would never get back to me, and I spent multiple months in that cycle. So, here's everything I know: I originally assumed it was a Triceratops scapula, because it had been offhandedly mentioned to me that was one of the purchases. However, I learned that the scapula was sent to our second show, and after comparing it to images of skeletons, I ruled that out. I changed my guess to Triceratops Ulna. A very well known paleontologist (whose name I won't reveal here) visited our show as part of a media promotion this summer, and when asked, took a look. He initially didn't disagree with my assessment, but a few days later emailed me, saying that after additional analysis of the pictures he took, he had changed his mind to Triceratops tibia, and later, after consulting a colleague who specializes in Ceratopsians, he asserted it was a Triceratops Fibula. Some time later, I finally talked to someone in accounting, who was able to get me the various invoices, which was somehow less helpful than you'd think it would be. But it did let me get in touch with our dealer, who is notoriously secretive and doesn't share much in terms of sourcing. She did reply to me, however, telling me it is an... Edmontosaurus humerus. Or at least that was the highlighted bone in the diagram she sent me, which is the closest piece of "official" documentation that I've seen since it was purchased. However, this looks different to the same bone on mounted skeletons of Edmontosaurus as well, at least to my eyes. tl;dr: I no longer trust anybody. Multiple conflicting identifications, I don't know where it came from, other than a mention in the dealer's email that it's from the Hell Creek formation. Company is restructuring, so getting responses from anyone is a miracle. I can upload better pictures of the fossil later if necessary. I no longer put this piece on display because I simply don't know what to call it. Help.
  21. The winner of the August 2019 VFOTM goes to... Ichthyosaurus sp. (possibly I. communis) - Jurassic (Hettangian) - circa 190 MYA - Preplanobis Beds, Lavernock Point, UK Congratulations to @Welsh Wizard !!!
  22. Check the entries below carefully and cast your vote! PM me if you notice any errors with the entries. The poll ends September 9th. Be sure to vote in our other FOTM poll, HERE 1. Iguanodon or Mantellisaurus indeterminate bone section - Early Cretaceous - Compton Bay, Isle of Wight, England. Wessex Formation 2. Ptyctodontid placoderm tooth - Famennian, Late Devonian - Ketvergiai Quarry, Klaipeda District, Western Lithuania 3. Dipteridae fossil dental plate - Famennian, Late Devonian - Ketvergiai Quarry, Klaipeda District, Western Lithuania 4. Enchodus petrosus Saber-Tooth Salmon jaw section with 2 partial and 1 complete tooth - Late Cretaceous, Navesink Formation - Big Brook, Colts Neck, New Jersey 5. Plesiosaurid cf Plesiosaurus dolichodeirus paddle digits and ribs - Jurassic, Charmouth Mudstone Formation - Charmouth, Dorset, England 6. Orodus sp., early shark tooth - LaSalle Limestone Member of the Bond Formation, Pennsylvanian - Oglesby, Illinois 7. Ichthyosaurus sp. (possibly I. communis) - Jurassic (Hettangian) - circa 190 MYA - Preplanobis Beds, Lavernock Point, UK 8. Listracanthus hystrix (4 associated shark dermal denticles) - Pennsylvanian, Mecca Quarry Shale - Starved Rock Clay Products Pit, Utica, Illinois 9. Two acanthodian fish spines - Pennsylvanian, Mecca Quarry Shale - Starved Rock Clay Products Pit, Utica, Illinois 10. Holosteus sp. fish - Oligocene - Rogi, Poland 11. Allopleuron hofmanni (Sea-turtle) 4 verts in association with the back of the shield - Maastrichtian, Emael Formation - Eben-Emael, Belgium 12. Carcharocles aksuaticus shark tooth - Woodstock Member, Nanjemoy FM, Ypresian, Eocene - Maryland 13. Hybodont tooth, likely central cusp - Jurassic - Lyme Regis, Dorset, UK 14. cf. Saurornitholestes langstoni (Dromaeosaurid) tooth - Campanian, Judith River formation - Valley County, Montana
  23. May be a long shot

    Hi, i know this may be a long shot, but i found this fossil in the cliffs of Hunstanton, Norfolk, UK It is in a red stone, and was originally in a much larger boulder Any ideas as to what it could belong to would be greatly helpful The rock is about 9cm at its longest point, and the fossil is roughly 7cm as it goes into the rock, and would be longer if not broken.
  24. Calvert Cliffs vertebra id

  25. The winner of the July 2019 VFOTM goes to... Articulated ichthyosaur vertebrae with rib, paddle bone and belemnites - Jurassic - Yorkshire Coast, UK Congratulations to @Crann!!!
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