Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'vertebrates'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 79 results

  1. Cretaceous vertebrates of North America

    here A new microvertebrate assemblage from the Mussentuchit Member, Cedar Mountain Formation: insights into the paleobiodiversity and paleobiogeography of early Late Cretaceous ecosystems in western North America Haviv M. Avrahami, Terry A. Gates, Andrew B. Heckert, Peter J. Makovicky, Lindsay E. Zanno PeerJ 6:e5883 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.5883 about 11 MB
  2. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. Attached is what I've got so far, but I can clearly use help with corals, mollusks, plants, vertebrates, ichnofossils, and the post-Paleozoic In the attached file, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like “conspicuous horn corals,” purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential, low recognizability, etc. Got additions/amendments, especially for the groups mentioned above? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you..... https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1tVm_u6v573V4NACrdebb_1OsBEAz60dS1m4pCTckgyA
  3. Hello! Long story short, my fossil collection perished in a house fire when I was a kid. I realized a few years ago that I was a Real Adult™ who didn't have to ask for parental permission to buy stuff and could rebuild what I'd lost, so after acquiring my first piece of amber – a big fat spider in Dominican Amber – I was hooked. Researching and buying fossils has been so fun and informative; I've been burned a few times with fakes, I've celebrated rarities, and I love having a little museum in my apartment. This past weekend I did the Museum of Natural History Sleepover in NYC and had a blast talking to an expert in the dinosaur wing, something I couldn't have done without this forum and a total crush on fossil trading, learning along the way. My current stash is focused mainly on claws, teeth, bones, plates, and anything encased in amber. Here's my main collection, with detailed photos and labeled descriptions to follow. Also, if anyone has further identification, feel free to chime in. You're the experts. Detailed pics and labels to come.
  4. Hi All. I was unsure where to put this message so hopefully this place is okay. I teach 7th grade Life Science and we are soon starting our coverage of major animal types (arthropods, echinoderms, molluscs, chordtates, etc). I am hoping to put together a teaching collection that can be used each year as we do this. If there are members here who are willing to donate any/all types of durable specimens (harder for young teens to destroy) that could be used to teach students the key features of these phyla. If you are willing and able to share can you please PM me directly. I do appreciate it :-)
  5. Help request! I am putting together a tool for judging rock age based on very crude, whole-rock, hand-sample observations of fossil faunas/floras -- the types of observations a child or beginner could successfully make. I view this as a complement to the very fine, species-level identifications commonly employed as index fossils for individual stages, biozones, etc. In this initial framework, vibrant orange indicates times in earth history to commonly observe the item of interest; paler orange indicates times in earth history to less commonly observe the item of interest. White indicates very little to no practical probability of observing the item of interest. Please keep in mind that the listed indicators are things like "conspicuous horn corals," purposefully declining to address rare encounters with groups of low preservation potential etc. Got additions/amendments? Toss them in the comments below! Thank you for your insight and assistance.....
  6. Here is a thread to share some of your rarest partials that if whole would've been incredible specimens, but you know how it is sometimes... Yet they still amazing to own a piece of. I will start off by sharing a piece of the tail of a Probolichas Kristiae, an incredibly unique looking rare lichid trilobite from Oklahoma that would've of been incredible if whole of course yet this piece still has amazing detail and I am more that happy to own
  7. hadrosaurid,2.0

    morphological_innovation_and_the_evolution_of_hadrosaurid_dinosaurs.pdf Morphological innovation and the evolution of hadrosaurid dinosaurs Thomas L. Stubbs , Michael J. Benton, Armin Elsler , and Albert Prieto-Márquez Paleobiology, 45(2), 2019, pp. 347–362 DOI: 10.1017/pab.2019.9 Given the source publication,the emphasis is perhaps not where you'd expect it to be Those who grimace at cladistics might not want to read this RECOMMENDED! rating:
  8. Part 1 Scientific Integrity in Education; Part 2: “The Great Dying” – end Permian extinction John Geissman, University of Texas at Dallas Geologists of Jackson Hole https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nYTuDP54ZI Yours, Paul H.
  9. Researchers discover more male than female mammalian fossils in museum collections by Bob Yirka , Phys.org https://phys.org/news/2019-09-male-female-mammalian-fossils-museum.html The Quirk of Collecting That Skews Museum Specimens Male. Only two orders of mammals—containing bats, anteaters, and sloths—are biased toward females. Rachel Gutman, The Atlantic, Sept. 11, 2019 https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/09/research-specimens-are-mostly-male/597832/ The paper is: Gower, G., Fenderson, L.E., Salis, A.T., Helgen, K.M., van Loenen, A.L., Heiniger, H., Hofman-Kamińska, E., Kowalczyk, R., Mitchell, K.J., Llamas, B. and Cooper, A., 2019. Widespread male sex bias in mammal fossil and museum collections. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 116(38), pp.19019-19024. https://www.pnas.org/content/116/38/19019.short Yours, Paul H.
  10. Hi everyone, I haven't been able to post much lately as I've been ill for a few months so haven't been getting out hunting as much as I'd like but I've had some good luck when I have been able to get out so wanted to share some finds! All are from the Carboniferous of the Midland Valley of Scotland from several formations, I haven't gotten round to photographing everything yet so I'll post some more stuff over the next few days. First some finds from the Lower Carboniferous/Mississippian marine Blackhall Limestone. Undescribed jellyfish, Fife Coast, 3cm across. Apparently a paper describing these is about to be published very soon. I'm told this ones a male, the bumps in the center being the male reproductive organs. This is by far the more common form, there is a second spotty form known from this formation which I found a specimen of a few weeks back and will post shortly.
  11. Quick question, I am aware it is illegal to export vertebrate fossils from China to other countries. Is it legal to ship them to the U.S. from Hong Kong, and Thailand?
  12. Fossils found in Fairmead landfill in Madera County, California https://abc30.com/science/fossils-found-in-madera-county-landfill/5431221/ Fossil Discovery Center of Madera County, in partnership with the San Joaquin Valley Paleontology Foundation https://www.maderamammoths.org/about.html McDonald, H.G., Dundas, R.G. and Chatters, J.C., 2013. Taxonomy, paleoecology and taphonomy of ground sloths (Xenarthra) from the Fairmead Landfill locality (Pleistocene: Irvingtonian) of Madera County, California. Quaternary Research, 79(2), pp.215-227. PDF file at: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/235921980_Taxonomy_paleoecology_and_taphonomy_of_ground_sloths_Xenarthra_from_the_Fairmead_Landfill_locality_Pleistocene_Irvingtonian_of_Madera_County_California https://www.researchgate.net/profile/H_McDonald Yours, Paul H.
  13. 310 million-year-old tree fossils to reveal new ancient animals by Hillary Maddin, The Conversation, July 16, 2019 https://theconversation.com/310-million-year-old-tree-fossils-to-reveal-new-ancient-animals-120195 https://phys.org/news/2019-07-million-year-old-tree-fossils-reveal-ancient.html Old science, new technology combine to unlock mysteries of Joggins Fossil Cliffs by Scott Doherty, Amherst News, April 18, 2019 https://www.cumberlandnewsnow.com/news/local/old-science-new-technology-combine-to-unlock-mysteries-of-joggins-fossil-cliffs-303536/ Yours, Paul H.
  14. Bones from Sharktooth Hill

    Hello, I returned from Sharktooth Hill (Bakersfield) with a bunch of bone fragments that seem to be mostly whale ribs and unidentifiable fragments. But I did have a few pieces that seemed distinctive enough that I thought someone more knowledgeable than me might be able to recognize. The third one from the top looks very similar to something another member posted (though not identified) - one side looks exactly like driftwood (is this known form STH?) but the other side very different, as shown in the pics. Someday I hope to be on the help-delivering side of the equation in this forum. Until then, much gratitude!
  15. Hey everyone - It's Christian. For the past few months, I was inactive on TFF as I had a lot of schoolwork.. But now, I've got a lot more time on my hands - which means that I can get back to all things fossil related This of course includes making preparations for my 3rd Møns Klint Fossil Excavation (MKFE - the fieldwork aspect of my Møns Klint Fossil Research Program). I'll be going for 2 weeks, in mid-August - I'm really excited! As I said in a post from a few months ago, the collection policy of this MKFE is essentially the same as last time's (cephalopod, crustacean, echinoderm and vertebrate material). This time, though, there'll be a bigger focus on articulated and/or associated material - eroded sea urchin spines and belemnite fragments are getting too numerous... On the first days of the field trip, I'll have to do quite a bit of prospecting for new sites to work at, because there's a chance that the landslide spoil heap from last year has most likely been washed away by the waves. I'm already having some ideas of particular projects for this field trip, which include a comprehensive collection of washout microfossils - to determine relative abundances of various faunal groups. Another project is the in-depth analysis of fossil material from different layers of chalk - which I hope will yield some zone fossils. Of course, I'm still hoping to find a lil' mosasaur tooth I'll also use this field trip as an opportunity to donate to the GeoCenter Møns Klint some of the fossils I found during the 2nd MKFE. I'll keep you guys posted! Stay tuned I'm so excited to getting back there! -Christian
  16. Hello Fossil Forum community, This is my first post. My name is Ben and I recently learned about the Peace River. After getting my fossil collecting permit, decided to try my hand at it! I loved collecting trilobites and sea animals in upstate NY, so to know there is a place in FL with abundant, remarkable and unusual fossils, makes me so happy! I live about 45min away from Paynes Creek Historic State Park; here the creek and river join. I collected these fossils just past the border of the park. I would like your help to try to ID them, please! Where Paynes Creek (right) meets lazy Peace River (left) Here are some fossils I think I know, but I am still unsure. Horse tooth? Dugong rib bone? (very dense feeling, like lead): Left: barracuda tooth? Right: claw? Back of "claw": Front: Front, zoomed: Side: Many thanks for any help, I love this River! Thanks for your time, Ben
  17. Great talk about the vertebrate paleontology of Kyrgyzstan. Changing Landscapes in the Tien Shan Mountains of Kyrgyzstan Royal Tyrrell Museum of Palaeontology Dr. Win McLaughlin (Oberlin College) Published on Mar 11, 2019 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IuoJi8rpPxA Yours, Paul H.
  18. Bored? Read a book! here you can download books about fossils for free. On this web site https://epdf.tips/ you can download many interesting books about fossils.Search for "fossils", "cambrian" or other keywords and you can get a whole bunch of pdfs (just as an example these titles): Evolution of Fossil Ecosystems Paleogene Fossil Birds Fossil Atlas Fishes Chinese Fossil Vertebrates Discovering Fossil Fishes Fossil Behavior Compendium Trace Fossil Analysis Fossil Sharks, a pictorial review Paleobiology and the Fossil record Paleobotany Dinosaur Tracks and other Fossil Fossil Horses, Systematics Jehol Fossils The Crato Fossil Beds of Brazil The Cambrian Fossils of Chengjiang China Oregon Fossils …….. and many more! Have fun Thomas
  19. Does anyone know of some good fossil sites in the Phoenix area, or within a couple of hours drive? Will be spending a couple of months there. Atrypa
  20. Would anyone have the following paper as a PDF? Miller, H.W. (1967) Cretaceous vertebrates from Phoebus Landing, North Carolina. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, 119:219-239 Thanks Mike
  21. Florida Pleistocene Sacrum

    I found this sacrum along with some other Pleistocene bones along Peace River. Does anyone know what animal this may be from?
  22. Florida Pleistocene Sacrum

    I found this sacrum along with some other Pleistocene bones along Peace River. Does anyone know what animal this may be from?
  23. Iguanodontidae in space & time

    JIGdinosauiguanodoclassickennethcarpente38807970.pdf Early and “Middle” Cretaceous Iguanodonts in Time and Space K. Carpenter, Y. Ishida Journal of Iberian Geology 36 (2) 2010: 145-164 Proplanicoxa: new genus
  24. On the surface this looks like a feather but i don't know if there are any plants that look like this. Here are the pics. Piece extracted from the cenomanian clay pits. Dated by argon from volcanic crystals on strata to cenomanian age late cretaceous.
  25. discussion and expert opinion

    baronrauhutezcurbrusatnaturedinosauLangerdbnormanat.2017.pdf Nature,november 2017,v.551 Untangling the dinosaur family tree. Max C. Langer, Martín D. Ezcurra, Oliver W. M. Rauhut, Michael J. Benton, Fabien Knoll, Blair W. McPhee, Fernando E. Novas, Diego Pol & Stephen L. Brusatte ARISING FROM M. G. Baron, D. B. Norman & P. M. Barrett Nature 543, 501–506 (2017); doi:10.1038/nature21700 0,470 Mb
×