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Found 61 results

  1. Does anyone know of some good fossil sites in the Phoenix area, or within a couple of hours drive? Will be spending a couple of months there. Atrypa
  2. Would anyone have the following paper as a PDF? Miller, H.W. (1967) Cretaceous vertebrates from Phoebus Landing, North Carolina. Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, 119:219-239 Thanks Mike
  3. Florida Pleistocene Sacrum

    I found this sacrum along with some other Pleistocene bones along Peace River. Does anyone know what animal this may be from?
  4. Florida Pleistocene Sacrum

    I found this sacrum along with some other Pleistocene bones along Peace River. Does anyone know what animal this may be from?
  5. Iguanodontidae in space & time

    JIGdinosauiguanodoclassickennethcarpente38807970.pdf Early and “Middle” Cretaceous Iguanodonts in Time and Space K. Carpenter, Y. Ishida Journal of Iberian Geology 36 (2) 2010: 145-164 Proplanicoxa: new genus
  6. On the surface this looks like a feather but i don't know if there are any plants that look like this. Here are the pics. Piece extracted from the cenomanian clay pits. Dated by argon from volcanic crystals on strata to cenomanian age late cretaceous.
  7. discussion and expert opinion

    baronrauhutezcurbrusatnaturedinosauLangerdbnormanat.2017.pdf Nature,november 2017,v.551 Untangling the dinosaur family tree. Max C. Langer, Martín D. Ezcurra, Oliver W. M. Rauhut, Michael J. Benton, Fabien Knoll, Blair W. McPhee, Fernando E. Novas, Diego Pol & Stephen L. Brusatte ARISING FROM M. G. Baron, D. B. Norman & P. M. Barrett Nature 543, 501–506 (2017); doi:10.1038/nature21700 0,470 Mb
  8. A few new Cretaceous fossils in my collection

    Hey everyone Last week I went to a small mineral/fossil market/exhibition near Lille (northern France). The thing lasted the whole weekend (29th and 30th September) - I managed to get to it just a few hours before it closed. There wasn't much diversity in terms of fossils, but I did spot some rather neat stuff - including some cool vertebrate specimens Cephalic 'armour' of a small placoderm (don't really remember from where, tho... ) Well-preserved eurypterid from the Silurian of Ukraine Little array of dinosaur teeth from the Cretaceous of USA (I think the seller mentioned that they were from the Hell Creek Fm.) More dinosaur (and 1 pterosaur, bottom-left corner) teeth; including 2 Bothriospondylus teeth from Madagascar.. I'd have loved to buy them Well-preserved Keichousaurus from the Triassic of Guizhou province (China). I didn't only 'gawk' at the fossils, I also bought a few little things : 2 small ?Lepisosteus fish teeth from the Cenomanian (Cretaceous) of Cap Blanc Nez (coast of northern France) I'm rather pleased I bought this one... Associated cranial remains of a small frog (?Ranidae) from the Maastrichtian (Late Cretaceous) of the Hell Creek Formation (Montana, USA). Seller told me that stuff is fairly uncommon.. Well, that's it Hope you enjoyed this -Christian EDIT: The last item (thanks for pointing this out, @jdp!) is actually a Doleserpeton skull from the Permian of Oklahoma... not a Hell Creek Fm. frog skull -Apologies for any confusion
  9. More ancient specimens found at mammoth recovery site near Cody Mark Davis, Powell Tribune, Wyoming News Exchange, Aug 29, 2018 https://trib.com/news/state-and-regional/more-ancient-specimens-found-at-mammoth-recovery-site-near-cody/article_aedecb6e-d253-57c4-888c-7e4f0240e15e.html More fossil vertebrates recovered from Buffalo Bill Reservoir http://k2radio.com/scientists-several-more-fossils-found-at-wyoming-reservoir/ Unfortunately, with both articles, a person has to deal with annoying pop-ups and / or advertisements. Yours, Paul H.
  10. Good grief, what have you, dung?

    LAS HOYAS Citation: Barrios-de Pedro S, Poyato-Ariza FJ, Moratalla JJ, Buscalioni ÁD (2018) Exceptional coprolite association from the Early Cretaceous continental Lagerstätte of Las Hoyas, Cuenca, Spain. PLoS ONE 13(5): e0196982. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0196982 Copyright: © 2018 Barrios-de Pedro et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Data Availability: All relevant data are within the paper and its Supporting Information files. The coprolites studied for the present paper are housed at the Museo de las Ciencias de Castilla-La Mancha (MCCM) in Cuenca, Spain, where they are part of the Las Hoyas (LH) collection. RECOMMENDED note: about 31 Mb I have a fairly average connection, and it took under one minute to download.
  11. Death ray

    Giuseppe Marramà, Kerin M. Claeson, Giorgio Carnevale & Jürgen Kriwet(about 4 Mb) (2018) Revision of Eocene electric rays (Torpediniformes, Batomorphii) from the Bolca Konservat- Lagerstätte, Italy, reveals the first fossil embryo insitu in marine batoids and provides new insights into the origin of trophic novelties in coral reef fishes, Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, 16:14, 1189-1219, DOI: 10.1080/14772019.2017.1371257 Sensitive people should beware of figs. 15 and 16 I resisted the temptation (lover of classic photography) to work Man Ray in there somewhere
  12. Hello, I have been recently shopping around for fossil books that are more image heavy to look around at on my downtime, the few I have so far seem to be generally focused on all fossils and contain hardly any fossil vertebrates from the mesozoic or tertiary periods. Thus I am on the look out for any books that would be good fits, there was one I cannot remember the name for the life of me that I think is a large recent book that I've seen in B&N that goes over all time periods in full color with fossil photos/creature images, if anyone knows maybe which one that could be I was definitely on the lookout for it but any recommendations are awesome.
  13. NALMA, SALMA, GABI

    FLYKOwswish this article has some bearing on the following issues: Mammal biochronology,the precise timing and/or speed of the G(reat)A(merican)B(iotic)I(nterchange),it contains some remarks on mammal taxa(however brief), magnetostratigraphic resolution from the Miocene to the Pleistocene, the closing of the Panama isthmus, and the possible diachroneity of mammal taxon appearances. There are NO taxa illustrated,and the authors' (infrequent)use of "heterochroneity " is unfortunate . If you have Woodburne(2012): this might be up your alley I liked it,but I'm weird that way
  14. Fossils and Beach Volleyball on a Glacier The Bates Club of Antarctica: Fossils and Beach Volleyball on a Glacier By Emily McConville, Bates University, April 20, 2018 http://www.bates.edu/news/2018/04/20/bates-club-of-antarctica-fossils-and-beach-volleyball-on-a-glacier/ Other posts in this series: https://www.bates.edu/news/2018/04/05/bates-club-of-antarctica-if-glaciers-could-talk-what-would-they-say/ https://www.bates.edu/news/2018/04/12/bates-club-of-antarctica-if-you-give-a-seal-a-camera/ Yours, Paul H.
  15. https://us.cnn.com/2018/04/20/us/california-fossil-treasure-trove/index.html
  16. This question just crossed my mind today, seemingly without provocation: What are the oldest known coprolites in the fossil record, whether from vertebrates or invertebrates? I know of Paleozoic coprolites, but is there any evidence of coprolites before that, perhaps from the Ediacaran? And if there are no pre-Cambrian coprolites recorded, what are the oldest known from the Paleozoic? I have a feeling that @GeschWhat might know a thing or two about this subject since, after all, she is the official Queen of Poopiness on TFF.
  17. Triassic Period Emergence of Dinosaurs

    Decade of fossil collecting in Africa gives new perspective on Triassic period, emergence of dinosaurs Michelle Ma, University Of Washington News, http://www.washington.edu/news/2018/03/28/decade-of-fossil-collecting-in-africa-gives-new-perspective-on-triassic-period-emergence-of-dinosaurs/ https://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2018/03/decade-fossil-collecting-africa-gives-new-perspective-triassic-period Memoir 17: Vertebrate and Climatic Evolution in the Triassic Rift Basins of Tanzania and Zambia, Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ujvp20/current Yours, Paul H.
  18. until
    On Friday (4-20-2018) at 7:30 pm, Dr. Ted Daeschler from the Academy of Natrural Sciences at Drexel University, Philadelphia, with conduct a FREE lecture titled - "Great Steps in the History of Life: The Origin of Limbed Vertebrates". The lecture will be held at the College of DuPage in Wheaton, Illinois at the "Health and Science Center (HSC) Room 1234.
  19. Kem kem vertebrae

    I bought this partial vertebrae about a week ago from a moroccan dealer for a very good price (I'm currently trying to identify many vertebrate fossils from Kem Kem, and this is somewhat a pause between two spinosaurid caudal vertebrae and a very big crocodilian mandible articular bone). Since many of you are way more experienced than me regarding moroccan vertebrae, I'm searching for more opinions. This small/medium sized specimen lacks most of the processes, but has some recognizable elements. It is laterally compressed and has a small keel running in its ventral region. I identified It as a caudal vertebrae, and the dealer told me it was a theropod. I don't think he had the skills to seriously identify anything, and I can't understand if It really is a theropod or a crocodile.
  20. Camping in the Campanian

    CAROLI 8.6 Mb Thesis by Crane,lemon,basket etc Area:Elizabethtown
  21. Hi, I recently finished processing 4kg of matrix from a horizon in the Upper Hamstead Mbr. of the Bouldnor Fm. from Bouldnor Cliff and thought I'd share the results! The White Band is definitely the most diverse vertebrate fauna I've collected so far in my short time screen washing, with at least 2/3 genera of fish, 2 genera of reptiles, and 2 genera of mammals, it also has some interesting taphonomy. The White Band refers to a thick Polymesoda shell bed in the Upper Hamstead Mbr. and dates to approximately 33 million years bp during the Rupelian. The Upper Hamstead Member is the youngest strata in the entire paleogene sequence of the Hampshire Basin (Late Palaeocene to Early Oligocene). The horizon was deposited in a shallow freshwater lacustrine environment on the low-lying Solent Group coastal plain of the southern Hampshire Basin. By the time the White Band was deposited average annual temperatures in the region were beginning to warm up again after the sudden and rapid cooling that marked the Eocene-Oligocene transition. Global sea levels were also beginning to rise. The Grande Coupure, the large scale turnover of European mammalian faunas had been and gone, and the endemic Eocene groups such as Palaeotheres, Omomyid primates, and anoplotheres had long vanished. The lake/pond system that deposited the White Band was home to aquatic plants such as Stratiotes and was fringed by patches of open woodlands of Sequoia, Pine, and broadleaf. With the post-grande coupure fauna now established the landscape was home to anthracotheres, hornless rhinos, hyaenodonts, bear-dogs, entelodonts, primitive ruminants, choeropotamids, and a myriad of smaller mammals including bats, adapid primates, rodents, insectivores, marsupials, and the otter-like pantolestids. Not to mention the alligators, birds, and freshwater turtles. 1. Worn fragment of Emys carapace 2. Possible fragment of crocodilian osteoderm? 3. Fragment of Bowfin skull bone 4. Isoptychus sp. cheek tooth. Theridomyid rodents like Isoptychus are the most commonly found micro-mammal throughout the entire Solent Group. This molar has been heavily worn which may suggest an older individual. Theridomyids were bipedal and foraged along the ground and in low trees. They also seem to have fed on the seeds of marginal aquatic plants such as Stratiotes, which may be the reason this individual was in the vicinity of the pond/lake. The Theridomyids were one of only a few Eocene mammal groups to survive the Grande Coupure and seemed to have survived fairly unscathed in terms of diversity etc. showing what hardy and adaptable rodents they probably were. 5. Fragment of M3 from a talpid, most likely Myxomygale sp. (just 1.5mm long!). Talpids (or as we call them today, Moles) were newcomers to Europe with the Grande-Coupure, arriving from Asia. Belonging to the tribe Urotrichini (Shrew-Moles) which are only found in North America and Asia today, Myxomygale may have spent most of the day underground in burrows before emerging at night to feed on invertebrates. Modern Shrew-Moles prefer moist habitats such as swampy areas, a habitat which was abundant on the low-lying coastal plain of the Oligocene Isle Of Wight. The taphonomy of the White Band is also interesting. Some specimens i.e. the Emys fragment and osteoderm are highly 'polished' and worn, suggesting transport prior to deposition. Whereas others such as the mammals and most fish material I've recovered are unworn and 'fresh' looking. I'm not sure what conditions could have caused this, and if anyone has any suggestions I'd be really interested. My take is that the mammals and fish were likely living in the immediate area, in and around the lake/pond, whereas the polished material is from animals living some distance away brought to the pond/lake by floods or streams etc. although I'm no trained geologist or palaeontologist. Thanks for reading, Theo
  22. East Coast fossil road trip

    Hello! Later this year I'm planning on moving from Florida back to New England. I was hoping to make the voyage into an interesting road trip... I've heard of several places in the Eastern half of the US where you can dig your own fossils. I know that there are some places in Georgia and the Carolinas that are good to find Megalodon teeth, and some places in the northern US that are good for finding trilobites... I'm up for anything interesting and was looking for suggestions on exact places, tour companies, people, anything that you can offer that might extend my collection on the trip!
  23. Unknown Gainesville Creek Fossils

    Hello everyone, I recently went fossil hunting in Rattlesnake Creek of Gainesville, Florida (Late Miocene) and uncovered many different fossils but three of them I am unsure of the identity of them. I believe one may be a type of vertebrae, but the others I can not place. The creek is shallow, relatively fast moving with a sandy bottom but many areas where gravel, fossils and stones accumulate. The first 4 pictures are of the same fossil, the next 3 of the the second, and the last 3 pictures of the last fossil. I would appreciate any attempts to help identify. Thank you very much!
  24. Hi, I've recently fully processed some matrix from the Lower Hamstead Mbr. that I collected back in November, and I thought I'd share some of my finds in a similar way to my Bembridge Marls Mbr. material. The matrix originates from a 'shelly' horizon in the Lower Hamstead Mbr. and was collected from fallen blocks at the base of a low cliff exposure at Bouldnor Cliff. The Lower Hamstead Mbr. overlays the late Eocene Bembridge Marls and dates from the very earliest Oligocene epoch, approximately 33.75 - 33.5 million years ago. To put the finds into an environmental context the Lower Hamstead Mbr. was deposited during a period of rapid global cooling and drop in sea levels associated with the onset of antarctic glaciation (Oi-1). The cooling and eustatic change had begun in the late Eocene, with the palaeo-environments of the Bembridge Marls becoming increasingly terrestrial towards the Eocene/Oligocene boundary. By the Lower Hamstead Member the southern Hampshire Basin was a low lying coastal plain with extensive wetlands, lakes, ponds and sluggish rivers flowing south east towards the early channel (at this time the channel was more a large embayment with only occasional connection to the North Sea). The dense sub-tropical forests of the late Eocene had disappeared and the landscape was dominated by open woodlands of pine, sequoia, and oak. The environment was much cooler and annual rainfall had significantly dropped since the Eocene, although temperatures would begin to rise again further into the rupelian and Hamstead Mbrs. The basin was surrounded by areas of chalk upland (still existing today) with forests of sequoia and broadleaf species. This dramatic climate change is likely what triggered the Grande Coupure, in which endemic Eocene mammals like the palaeotheres disappeared and were replaced with Asian groups such as carnivorans, rhinocerotids, anthracotheres, and a variety of other artiodactyls. The mammals of the dense tropical Eocene forests simply couldn't adapt fast enough to the new open environments of the Oligocene and ultimately failed to compete against the better adapted migrants. By the Upper Hamstead Member the mammals on the Hampshire Basin coastal plain are almost entirely of Asian origin. Therefore the micro-vertebrates lived in an environment of large scale climatic and ecological change, which I think adds another level of interest to collecting from this member of the Bouldnor Fm. The material I've collected so far is a lot more varied than the Bembridge Marls, but overall is less abundant. So far it's produced at least 3 fish taxa, 2 mammals, and an indeterminate piece of jaw which may be reptilian or mammal. 1. A skull element from a Bowfin (Amia sp.), these fish are very common in most horizons of the Bouldnor Fm. 2. A vertebra from a Bowfin (Amia sp.) 3. A damaged lateral scute from a Sturgeon (Acipenser sp.) showing the transition to a freshwater environment 4. An indeterminate piece of a tiny jaw, may be crocodilian although I'm not sure. 5. The nicest find of the lot, a lower incisor from the theridomyid rodent Isoptychus (ID'd by Jerry hooker from the NHM). These rodents looked similar to modern kangaroo rats, hopping along the ground on large rear legs. Bite marks on Isoptychus bones collected from Thorness Bay suggest that they were common prey for the bear-dog Cynodictis. 6. Finally 2 images of an unidentified mammal tooth. I'm unsure as to whether this is part of the tooth or the entire crown, but it doesn't appear to be from a rodent. Hope you all enjoyed the finds, Theo
  25. FotY gallery?

    Hey! Is there a winners gallery for FotY? If there is, is there any way to sticky it to the top?
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