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Found 17 results

  1. Ogyginus Corndensis

    From the album Trilobites

    A nice little trilobite I aquired from the United Kingdom. Ogyginus Corndensis, from the Landrindod Wells, Powys, Wales. Ordovician in age. Trilobite is about half an inch.
  2. I found this on the foreshore at Penarth beach (rocky) close to cliffs. I assumed it could be a trace fossil of some kind? Somebody on Reddit suggested perhaps Fusulinids, and they certainly resemble those from what I’ve seen, but it doesn’t look to tie in with the age of the rocks at the site.
  3. I’m a complete beginner so please forgive my ignorance. I found this on my second time deliberately looking for fossils. Honestly, I’ve no idea if it’s a fossil. I did find some other interesting things too but nothing like this. I’ve researched Penarth and it’s suggested that the formation is early Blue Lias? Or Lias Group and dates to Jurassic period. This was found towards the bottom of a cliff and I do not believe it’s been submerged by the sea. Thanks in advance for any pointers, Nathan
  4. Weird fossil

    Hello all I was relooking at a piece I obtained many years ago. It has a beautifel cephalon of Trinucleus fimbriatus, which was the reason I bought it. I noticed this weird, rond fossil in the same piece. I was not a member here then and I didn't found it online. I forgot about the object until today. Now I want to know what it is. Does anyone here has an idea? I thought It might be one of the early development stages of a trilobite. It looked like a protaspis but is way to big (online they say protaspis are less than 1 mm, while this piece is 4mm) It's from the middle Ordovician of Builth Wells, Wales. Thanks already.
  5. What is it?

    Hi I found this at Monknash, South Wales coast, UK. Do you know what it is please.
  6. Id this fossil

    Can you help me identify this please. We found it on a beach in angelsey last year. Thanks
  7. Dinosaur Footprint Cast?

    Hello, I found this last year during a fossil hunting trip in the Bendricks, South-Wales. I know their are several track ways and some 200+ footprints embedded within the rock around the local areas, however I have not seen a footprint cast from this locality either (that I know of). I have tried finding a contact for the geology department at the national museum based in Cardiff, though it has been unsucessful. Any light you can shed on this would be much appreciated! It may be just a conveniently shaped rock, however it is always worth asking. Apologies for the picture, I've had to rely on someone else for the picture - it is slightly larger than than palm size. Local rocks are Triassic - approx 220 million years
  8. Dino flesh and skin fossil?

    Hi all, found this fossil, thought it was tree bark or sediment layers until i turned piece over. Looks to be a skin and soft tissue fossil, has small (approx 1mm) scale like bumps on front face, and what appears to be a meeting point to bones, possibly ribs on rear, with a distint layer between resembling a muscle layer. Any thoughts or input would be greatly appreciated. Many thanks, B.Davies
  9. Palastraea regia

    Formerly often included in Palaeosmilia which is now restricted to solitary forms. A very distinctive colonial coral, astraeoid to aphroid (aphroid in this case, i.e. with septa that do not join between corallites). The calices can be up to 5cm across. In this specimen, many of the voids are lined with quartz crystals, others are filled completely. (Traces of blue are from a polishing paste).
  10. ID Please My few Finds

    Hi a Few finds that i picked up at lavernock wales, Love some Id Please Thanks Bob ive Put the Pics in order, Pics 1 2 and 3 I did a little prep work on it, think it is Fossilised wood. Pics 4 5 and 6 Ive been told that is a vert and sure hope so.. Pics 7 8 and 9 Think its Internal Chambers from a Large Ammonite ? maybe nortilus (hoping) 10, 11 and 12 wow cant believe the size of it and both sizes in amazing condition.... Plecostimus ? Thanks Bob
  11. Please help ID fossil, Wales UK

    Hi, whilst walking the beach at Llantwit Major (Wales) I came across this fossil. It was approx. 30cm wide. I was wondering if anyone could help me identify it? Thanks for your help!
  12. Didymograptus marchioness graptolite

    From the album Various

    Didymograptus marchioness graptolite from Abereiddi Bay, Wales, U.K. Ordovician.
  13. From the album Multi-slabs

    Not sure what these are yet. Carboniferous limestone at Burley Hill near the quarry collected 2015.
  14. 200-Million Year Old Theropod from Wales

    Here is an article from Paleontology News about the new theropod, Dracoraptor http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/01/160120202414.htm A new carnivorous dinosaur species named Dracoraptor hanigani uncovered in the south of Wales is possibly the oldest known Jurassic dinosaur from the UK, according to a study published January 20, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by David Martill from the University of Portsmouth, England, and colleagues from National Museum Wales and University of Manchester. The authors of this study that analyzed the dinosaur skull and bones, discovered in 2014 on a beach near Penarth, Wales, conclude it is a new species that they have named Dracoraptor hanigani. The name Dracoraptor means 'dragon robber.' Draco, meaning dragon, is the national symbol of Wales. The species name honors Nick and Rob Hanigan, who discovered the fossil. From their analysis, the researchers believe this dinosaur was meat-eating, from the theropod group. They also suggested that it may have been a juvenile animal, as most of its bones were not yet fully formed or fused. Compared to its distant relative the T. rex, it appears to be a small, agile animal, probably only about 70 cm tall and about 200 cm long, with a long tail, likely to help it balance. It lived at the beginning of the Jurassic Period (201 million years ago), at the time when south Wales was a coastal region like it is today. However, at the time, the climate was much warmer, and dinosaurs were just starting to diversify. The new specimen represents the most complete theropod from Wales, and may possibly represent one of the oldest known Jurassic dinosaurs in the UK or even in the world. Co-author Mr. Vidovic adds, "The Triassic-Jurassic extinction event is often credited for the later success of dinosaurs through the Jurassic and Cretaceous, but previously we knew very little about dinosaurs at the start of this diversification and rise to dominance. Now we have Dracoraptor, a relatively complete two meter long juvenile theropod from the very earliest days of the Jurassic in Wales."
  15. New Welsh Dinosaur

    Hi Here's a selection of news links to the new Welsh Dinosaur that was found by Nick Hanigan and Rob Hanigan in South Wales, UK There are lots of stories out there. We made all the UK newspapers yesterday, we were trending on Twitter and the BBC website in the top stories. We made most news bulletins throughout the day and appeared on a number of radio and TV shows. The story seems to be slowly filtering overseas as we've had reports from Europe and the US. Cardiff Museum Twitter Feed https://twitter.com/museum_cardiff BBC Website Story http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-south-east-wales-33053184 Independent Newspaper Story http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/the-trex-has-a-welsh-cousin-new-jurassicera-dinosaur-species-discovered-in-wales-10308187.html CNN News http://edition.cnn.com/videos/tv/2015/06/10/dinosaur-discovery-t-rex-cousin-orig.cnn The scientific paper and name will follow shortly Best Regards Nick Hanigan
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