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Found 9 results

  1. Greetings fellow fossil lovers! Below is an assortment of fossils from the Waurika clay from the Lower Permian that I'm having trouble placing an id on. Scale bar is in millimeters. Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks All! Jacob
  2. Hi everyone I think I just found a new hobby With my latest fossil delivery I recieved quite a lot of microfossils & matrix vials as the world of microfossils was something that I have been long interested in. So a 2 weeks ago I finally ordered my first microfossils for which I reserved a special drawer in my archive cabinet. So here is a recapp of what I all got: 3 vials of permian material from Waurika, Oklahoma 1 vial of permian material from The red beds of Archer County, Texas 1 small vial of Conodont rich Mississippian material from the Chappel Limestone formation, Texas 1 small vial of Cretaceous Lower Gault Clay, East Wear bay, Folkestone, Kent, UK A micropalaeontology slide with Jurassic Blue Lias matrix rich in holothurian material. A thin section of an Ostracods filled Elimia snail from the Green River Formation in Wyoming A thin section from the Rhynie chert of Scotland which should contain preserved parts of the plant Aglaophyton major and perhaps even other species. I also got a lot of Bull Canyon micro fossil teeth and 2 cretaceous mammal teeth from Hell Creek In this topic you will be able to follow my path through this newly discovered hobby as I will post my finds and progress Currently I am only working with a clip-on cellphone microscope, but I do plan on getting a professional microscope in the next few months! (Tips are always welcome) So let's put on our Ant-Man suit and explore the microfossil realm So here are some of the first pictures I made of some of the microfossils Starting with the thin slices! Thin slice with Ostracon filled Elimia tenara snail from the Green River Formation, Wyoming Thin slice with Aglaophyton major from Rhynie Chert in Scotland
  3. Hi! I recently acquired a few new additions to my permian collection, but there are a few pieces of which I am not a 100 % whether they are ID'd correctly, simply because I am not yet knowlegdeable about the material. So I thought it might be a good idea to post the ones I am doubtfull about here, as I know there are a lot of people more knowlegdeable than me who probably could ID them. The first item is a small claw listed as "juvenile dimetrodon limbatus" from the Red Beds, Archer County, Texas, USA I was a bit doubtfull when they said "juvenile" dimetrodon claw, but I got it anyway because it's a very nice permian claw which was an okay price regardless the ID. The second item is a caudal vertebra that was listed as "Edaphosaurus" (from the Archer City Formation, Red Beds, Archer County, Texas, USA) which came as a set along with a piece of sail spine which without doubt belongs to Edaphosaurus. The last items were sold as a collection of "Eryops megacephalus" fossils from the Wellington garbar complex, Waurika, Okhlahoma. From left to right are a piece of skull plate, a toe bone, a piece of dermal armor and a tooth.
  4. Permian and Miocene micros

    Unfortunately I am still waiting to be called back to work. I have been trying to find things to do to occupy my time. Last week was tough due to brutally cold temps. Finally we have hit a warm spell as yesterday and today hit somewhere in the 50's. I tried fishing for a few hours, but the snow melt raised the water levels and made the creeks muddy. Atleast it was a beautiful day to be outdoors. When I got home I decided to finish looking through some Permian micro matrix from Waurika, Oklahoma. I got this from @Fossildude19 who got some from @Jeffrey P . While I did not find a lot of fossils in this batch, I did find a few teeth. I found one very small Orthacanthas tooth, which I was really hoping I would and a few which I am not sure about. Also last night I finished going through the last bit of matrix from Sharktooth Hill, which I got from @caldigger in an auction lot that I won. This matrix was extremely loaded with fossils. First up is a pic of the Permian teeth.
  5. More Permian Waurika Finds

    So, I have some more finds from the Permian matrix. A few coprolites, and some teeth. Scales and bones I may put up in another post. Thanks for looking... Squares are 5mm x 5mm Orthocanthus teeth? Miscellaneous teeth ...
  6. Permian coprolite from Waurika

    Thanks to my friend @Jeffrey P ! He had given me some matrix that he collected at the Lower Permian Waurika Oklahoma site on his epic road trip this summer. I have spent some time breaking down the clay matrix, and going through the remaining bits to look for fossils. I've found a few teeth so far, but this was pretty cool. I was putting some hunks of matrix into different solutions to try to break down the clay, and came across this larger solid bit. Upon cleaning it, I realized it mus be a coprolite. It has many inclusions, Orthocanthus teeth, what appear to be bone bits, and fish scales. @Carl @GeschWhat may be interested in this. Enjoy! Matrix from the Lower Permian Wellington - Garbar Complex Note: each square on the background is 5mm by 5mm Coprolite is 2 cm long.
  7. My beautiful wife scheduled a three night stay at a cabin in a Thousand Trails campground near Lake Texoma. We were to arrive on Sunday and check out on Wednesday. So, I figured that, since I hadn't been fossil hunting in months, I would schedule a trip to central Texas to follow the Texoma trip. I set up a rendezvous point in Fairfield, Texas to meet my dad on that Wednesday, and head off toward Brownwood and Cisco, Texas. I figured that the fossil hunt would begin then. But that's not quite how things played out... My two oldest daughters and I met my wife and youngest daughter in Salado, Texas on Saturday, October 14th. They had left the previous morning to spend a day with my mother-in-law in Waco and Salado. We spent Saturday night in Salado and then parted ways with my mother-in-law on Sunday morning and headed toward Lake Texoma. As we drove through Waco, my wife asked if we wanted to take a detour. She had never been to Dinosaur Valley State Park in Glen Rose, Texas, and she thought the girls would enjoy seeing the dinosaur tracks in the Paluxy River. I got really excited. I hadn't been there since I was a kid, and at that time, the river was high and the tracks were not visible. So we adjusted our GPS to take us to Glen Rose. We pulled in and stopped off to get a map of the park. We then drove straight to the spot where Roland T. Bird made his first discovery. It was amazing. The water was low and gave us a clear view of the trackways in the river. Above you can see both the sauropod and theropod tracks, They are a little obscured by mud, but they are still very visible. We left the R.T. Bird site and went to another place called the Ballroom Track Site, where so many tracks go in so many directions, it was like the theropods were dancing. It was in slightly deeper water, but it was still beautiful! The rippling water was crystal clear and the girls couldn't help but get into the water, even as a cool front brought chilly winds down the river valley. My wife loved it. She told me that Dinosaur Valley State Park was our next camping destination. Before we left, we stopped off by the iconic Tyrannosaurus Rex and Apatosaurus models built for the 1964-65 World's Fair in New York. They were permanently installed at Dinosaur Valley in 1970 at the park's dedication. We left Dinosaur Valley and drove the rest of the way to our cabin at Lake Texoma, arriving just after dark. We settled in and tried to decide what we wanted to do the next day. It was Monday, and we figured there had to be something for the girls to do nearby. We quickly discovered that our options were limited. It had turned too cold for the pool at the campgrounds. The putt-putt at the campground was okay, but the girls quickly tired of it. And most of the other recreational equipment was not well kept, or available. So, we decided to leave the campground to find something for the girls to do. I had mentioned that I would like to check out the Permian site at Waurika, Oklahoma. It was only two hours away, and this was the closest I had ever been to the site. My wife was a bit miffed by the lack of things for the girls to do, so she said "Let's go." I jumped at the chance. I had done no research on the site, other than what I had read about it on TFF. I wish I had consulted the TFF experts before we left, because I had no idea of the best places to look. We focused mainly on the sandy floor and reddish rocks, and found nothing. When we returned to the cabin, I asked where we should have looked. Jesuslover340 informed me that the gray colored exposures were the places to find the best material. So, we came away empty handed, with only one major discovery. My wife wouldn't let me take it home, though... Continued in next post...
  8. Fish spine in Permian Poo?

    I have been going through a group of tiny coprolites from the Ryan Formation, Waurika, OK. Most of the inclusion I have come across are fish scales. Can anyone identify this ribbed bone? My first thought was part of a fish spine. Thanks in advance for your help!
  9. Looking through Permian microfossil material from Waurika, Oklahoma - Wellington Formation, I found what appears to be a barbed tooth. I cannot find ID on this specimen on the internet and am asking for help on this one. Thank you
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