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Found 46 results

  1. Looks like something

    Hello all. I am no expert, just curious. I visited Greenbrier County West Virginia last July and picked up a few rocks along the banks of the Greenbrier River. After inspecting this one, I found what appears to be scales along its surface and a foot (arrow pointing). I have a lepidodendron root my uncle gave me the 1980s and it made me interested in fossils, just wondering if anyone can tell me what I’m looking at. Either way it’s a pretty neat find for me. If I should post more pictures, let me know. Thanks for any and all help!
  2. New location, still in Eastern Panhandle WV. One picture has the tip of a pencil so you can see size. The circled part...I am not sure. Are the shells brachiopods? I see some crinoid stem in there. Thank you for your insights.
  3. Are these Crinoid Stem?

    These were found in the same place, in black shale, in West Virginia. Are these both crinoid stem? Thank you for your help!
  4. We split open this rock yesterday and it has a mirror image of two things I am not sure of. #1 I see some shell... #2 Vegetation?
  5. Here are a few things I would love to know what they are: #1 Black shale that we used years ago to make a decorative siding for the barn, what are those shallow pits? This rock is about 7 inches long. #2 This came from a different area in the Eastern Panhandle that was near a large creek. #3 Same thing as #2? Thank you for your help!
  6. Black shale find - what is it?

    Hello, I like busting open local black shale to see what is inside. This is from the Eastern Panhandle in West Virginia. That is a pen in the picture to give perspective as to the size. I am finding a lot of Brachiopods in the same shale (you can see some of it in the picture) I am very new to hunting fossils, any groups local to Washington DC area? Thank you for checking out my shale.
  7. South Hills Site

    I moved up to South Hills, a suburb of Charleston, a few years ago and started hunting for fossils in the nearby creeks. The Charleston area is generally not great fossil territory, but I struck gold in Lick Branch. The creek is chock full of sandstone-replaced coal plants, mainly Stigmaria and Lepidodendron. I have pulled about 40 specimens out, the best one being the Stigmaria shown below.
  8. Some finds from a weekend hunt in the Late Pennsylvanian / Early Permian Dunkard Group of West Virginia. Any corrections or identifications are welcome and appreciated. Scale throughout is in mm.
  9. Hey, I am heading down to West Virginia for a family trip and I was wondering if anyone knew of some good local spots near Sutton? The closest place I found is about 2 hours away from there and it might just be too far to convince my family to follow. I know the area is Pennsylvanian formation, but I don't know much other than that.
  10. Novice to identifying fossils, if there's a lower rung on the knowledge scale it would probably be more applicable. Found this about 30cm deep in north central West Virginia about 12 miles south of Cumberland MD. Our yard is about 10cm of topsoil and at least a meter of hard packed shale (that's as far down as I've had the pleasure of digging for my projects). I've found other similar items but this one split to show the interior which caught my interest.
  11. Semi transparent shells?

    I recently bought a smallish "fossil kit" online. Just some fossils in a bag from an outfit in West Virginia. I figured there would be a lot of steinkerns & bad preservation. I wasn't wrong in that. Lots of gastropod steinkerns, mangled urchins & urchin spines & star shaped crinoid stem sections. And some shells that seem sort of crystallized that light shines through. 2 reg pics of one of the better ones + 2 pics of light shining through. Pic #5 is an edge view of one of the broken ones & #6 is what I think may be beekite, which is present on several of them. Not really concerned with shell id for the most part, more curious as to what replaced the shells to make them semi transparent like this. Almost crystallized or agatized.
  12. Mississippian bryozoa?

    Hey all, after a long work-related hiatus I have found myself back in a part of West Virginia that has fossils! Yesterday I found a long bed of unknown material exposed on a ridge in northern Monroe County with a lot of fossils in it. I don't know the formation, but from what I could find out this area should be Mississippian. Am I right in thinking the attached photo is a bryozoa? Also, if I collect more samples, take photos of the outcrop, and give a good description of the material might it be possible to identify the formation? Thanks
  13. Seed Fossil?

    These 2 are part of a many (50 or more) fossils/imprints I found in a creek bed on a visit this summer to our family farm in Ritchie County, WV. Since we're going back for a visit next week, I thought I'd try to ID these now and look for more while I'm there again. The bulk of the fossils/imprints I've ID'd as ferns, and maybe lycophytes (if my research so far is correct) but can't find anything on the imprints in the attached photos. I'm new to plant fossils, so would appreciate some help in ID'ing this set. Here's what I know: All the fossils/imprints I found, including the attached, were in the same 3-4 meter area along a shallow (1-1.5 meter high) creek bank in Ritchie County, WV; They were found in thick sheets of wet, muddy shale; and The 2 imprints in the photos fit into one another as a match/pair. Here are my questions: What are/were the 2 ovals that fit into one another in the photos? Is there anything else of interest I should be noticing in the attached photos and/or in the other similar fossils/imprints I've found? Note that the last photo are the 2 pieces flipped over. Thanks in advance.
  14. Gastropod or Cephalopod?

    Found this (Needmore Formation) at Lost River Site near Wardensville, WV. Size is 40mm, 1.5 inches. Anyone know what this might be? Thank you.
  15. What on earth is this?

    I have a regular collecting spot in Capon Bridge, WV, which is my go-to spot for Eldredgeops Rana trilobites. On my most recent outing I picked up this odd thing, and I have no idea what to make of it. There is a pencil just to the left of the fossil, for scale. The fossil is fairly flat, hardly three-dimensional, so no need for side photos. It appears to be three-pronged and pyritized.. pyritized in the same way that the trilobites often are at this location. The local shale is early to middle Devonian, I *think* Needmore Formation. Any thoughts welcome!
  16. West Virginia fossils

    While backpacking in the Cranberry Wilderness I found this soccer size rock with what appears to be carbonized plant material encased in a sandstone matrix. Can anyone shed further light on this specimen? Thank you
  17. Horn Coral

    Hi folks. I cleaned up the horn coral that I posted a pic of earlier. (was wondering if I could find it easily, then realized all I had to do was look for my watch. The missing Timex was much easier to spot. ) Here is pics of it. It is the largest of the many I have found here. Regards,
  18. Help ID this please

    This was given to me by a retired coal miner a few years ago. He said he found it in a coal mine many years ago in McDowell county West Virginia. Any kind of info would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
  19. Tooth ?

    Is this a toot, as I suspect. If it is, I would love opinions of what type. I found this, as well as several other specimens, in my yard after buying the house. I always thought they might have some importance, so I just kinda found a spot for them, and they stayed there until I got curious enough to look at them closely. This one photographs better than most of them. Can someone help me? It’s driving me crazy! LOL Thanks
  20. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopod Fossil, with Tentaculites SITE LOCATION: West Virginia TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (over 350 million years ago) Nicely detailed small Devonian brachiopod from West Virginia as well as several tentaculites impressions. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Tentaculites is an extinct genus of conical fossils of uncertain affinity, class Tentaculita, although it is not the only member of the class. It is known from Lower Ordovician to Upper Devonian deposits both as calcitic shells with a brachiopod-like microstructure and carbonaceous 'linings'. The "tentaculites" (i.e. tentaculita) are also referred to as the styliolinids. The taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain, but some group them with pteropods. They may also be related to other conical shells of uncertain affinity including cornulitids, Anticalyptraea, microconchids and trypanoporids. Their shell microstructure has warranted their comparison with the brachiopods and phoronids. Tentaculitids have ribbed, cone-shaped shells which range in length from 5 to 20 mm. Some species septate; their embryonic shell, which is retained, forms a small, sometimes spherical, chamber. Classification below is for both animals, and is split. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda/Mollusca (?) Class: Unknown/†Tentaculita Order: Unknown/†Tentaculitida Family: Unknown/†Tentaculitidae Genus: Unknown/†Tentaculites
  21. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopod Fossil, with Tentaculites SITE LOCATION: West Virginia TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (over 350 million years ago) Nicely detailed small Devonian brachiopod from West Virginia as well as several tentaculites impressions. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Tentaculites is an extinct genus of conical fossils of uncertain affinity, class Tentaculita, although it is not the only member of the class. It is known from Lower Ordovician to Upper Devonian deposits both as calcitic shells with a brachiopod-like microstructure and carbonaceous 'linings'. The "tentaculites" (i.e. tentaculita) are also referred to as the styliolinids. The taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain, but some group them with pteropods. They may also be related to other conical shells of uncertain affinity including cornulitids, Anticalyptraea, microconchids and trypanoporids. Their shell microstructure has warranted their comparison with the brachiopods and phoronids. Tentaculitids have ribbed, cone-shaped shells which range in length from 5 to 20 mm. Some species septate; their embryonic shell, which is retained, forms a small, sometimes spherical, chamber. Classification below is for both animals, and is split. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda/Mollusca (?) Class: Unknown/†Tentaculita Order: Unknown/†Tentaculitida Family: Unknown/†Tentaculitidae Genus: Unknown/†Tentaculites
  22. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopod Fossil, with Tentaculites SITE LOCATION: West Virginia TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (over 350 million years ago) Nicely detailed small Devonian brachiopod from West Virginia as well as several tentaculites impressions. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Tentaculites is an extinct genus of conical fossils of uncertain affinity, class Tentaculita, although it is not the only member of the class. It is known from Lower Ordovician to Upper Devonian deposits both as calcitic shells with a brachiopod-like microstructure and carbonaceous 'linings'. The "tentaculites" (i.e. tentaculita) are also referred to as the styliolinids. The taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain, but some group them with pteropods. They may also be related to other conical shells of uncertain affinity including cornulitids, Anticalyptraea, microconchids and trypanoporids. Their shell microstructure has warranted their comparison with the brachiopods and phoronids. Tentaculitids have ribbed, cone-shaped shells which range in length from 5 to 20 mm. Some species septate; their embryonic shell, which is retained, forms a small, sometimes spherical, chamber. Classification below is for both animals, and is split. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda/Mollusca (?) Class: Unknown/†Tentaculita Order: Unknown/†Tentaculitida Family: Unknown/†Tentaculitidae Genus: Unknown/†Tentaculites
  23. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Brachiopod Fossil, with Tentaculites SITE LOCATION: West Virginia TIME PERIOD: Devonian Period (over 350 million years ago) Nicely detailed small Devonian brachiopod from West Virginia as well as several tentaculites impressions. Brachiopods, phylum Brachiopoda, are a group of lophotrochozoan animals that have hard "valves" on the upper and lower surfaces, unlike the left and right arrangement in bivalve molluscs. Tentaculites is an extinct genus of conical fossils of uncertain affinity, class Tentaculita, although it is not the only member of the class. It is known from Lower Ordovician to Upper Devonian deposits both as calcitic shells with a brachiopod-like microstructure and carbonaceous 'linings'. The "tentaculites" (i.e. tentaculita) are also referred to as the styliolinids. The taxonomic classification of tentaculitids is uncertain, but some group them with pteropods. They may also be related to other conical shells of uncertain affinity including cornulitids, Anticalyptraea, microconchids and trypanoporids. Their shell microstructure has warranted their comparison with the brachiopods and phoronids. Tentaculitids have ribbed, cone-shaped shells which range in length from 5 to 20 mm. Some species septate; their embryonic shell, which is retained, forms a small, sometimes spherical, chamber. Classification below is for both animals, and is split. Kingdom: Animalia/Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda/Mollusca (?) Class: Unknown/†Tentaculita Order: Unknown/†Tentaculitida Family: Unknown/†Tentaculitidae Genus: Unknown/†Tentaculites
  24. I found this fossil around 4 years ago in a creek in West Virginia. I'm curious to know if it is possible to determine the time period when this fossil might have formed, the possible creature it might have been, and just more about it in general. The fossil is composed of a very deeply embedded scale pattern that is about 2.5 inches in diameter. Only about 1/2 of the fossil is very visible, and the fossil is in a layered black rock. The fossil appears as though it is long, like a snake would have been, but unfortunately I only have a small portion of the original fossil, so it's hard to tell. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
  25. Heading to WV This Weekend

    We are heading down to Athens, WV this weekend to visit some friends who just moved there from the midwest. None of the four of us knows the area. Anyone have any suggestions for a reasonably short road trip to do some hunting in their vicinity?
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