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Found 22 results

  1. Bone ID requested

    Good Afternoon all! I have found what appears to be a bone fossil. I would love some help if possible identifying it. It was found in Austin, TX in a stream bed. I did the lick test, and my tongue stuck to the porousness, (not that it is scientific, but I figured id add it, just something I read online). Along with the pictures of the potential bone, I also included a photo of all fossils I have found in the same area, coral, oysters and other random shells. All have been found on the surface, do digging, including the bone. The round stone is coral from the end Permian extinction, I know that much from my research, but the bone I am guessing is from around the time of the western interior seaway when this area opened up again. Hope I have provided enough information!
  2. Hi again from West KY. Hope these photos are OK. I've wrestled with them for a couple hours now. (LOL) This was found with some others while I was walking a creek in the Jackson Purchase area of KY, Graves County to be exact. This was on the surface, as were the others, all near each other. They look to have been washed out, as the banks of the creek are, in some places, as high as 15 - 20 ft. The other side was cut out in the 1800's to make a railroad track. The ruler didn't come out clearly, but, this measures about 9mm x 7mm x 5mm, weighs 552g. This area is known to have been under water, but most of the fossils I find are the small ones. When I saw this, I wondered if it was possible to have had a creature this large swimming HERE? That led to learning about the Western Interior Seaway, and yes, it DID reach here, (very exciting!). After researching this and another bone found with it, I came to think that it was a possible cetacean with signs of Osedax, during the Cretaceous perhaps. (?) After reading about Osedax, I found that now, the various species usually are separate from each other, but that in the W.I.S., many species would feed off of the same bones. *I added a photo of one of the others found with it. Just the one. I've second-guessed myself 1000 times about this and the other "bones", looked for other things that seemed more plausible, and been through tons of photos, websites, & scientific papers. The University of KY website didn't help to squash my excitement - here's a quote from them: "Cretaceous sediments are almost completely absent in Kentucky; only small areas of Cretaceous deposits occur in and near the Jackson Purchase Region in extreme western Kentucky. During most of the Cretaceous, Kentucky was land. If Cretaceous sediments covered any of this land, they have since been eroded away. However, during latest Cretaceous times, sea level rise coupled with subsidence in the Jackson Purchase Region led to deposition of coastal sediments in environments that included coastal plain, river, delta, and shallow sea. Because of the limited outcrops in the flat Jackson Purchase Region, very little in the way of fossils have been found in the Cretaceous sediments there. The most common fossils are coalified tree limbs. The potential exists for dinosaur fossils to be found in these sediments in Kentucky. Much more new research needs to be done on the Cretaceous in this region." I know some of you all can help, and it's very much appreciated! Even if it IS nothing more than a coral or whatever, at least I will know!
  3. Last summer, on the last day of a long weekend of backcountry fossil hunting around Lake Diefenbaker, Saskatchewan, my friend and I decided to stop our canoe at a beach where on a previous morning I had found a large baculites cuneatus specimen. This beach was an outcropping of a unit of the Bearpaw formation known as the Demaine sand, and dated roughly to the late Campanian. The locality was chock full of golfball to softball-sized nodules, each with a delicate, coalified fossil inside, ranging from crustacean parts, chips of driftwood, to loose vertebrae. It wasn't long before I was looking down at a split nodule containing the symmetrical lines I knew were a skull. So of course, I assembled it together as best as I could, wrapped it in a sock, and we loaded back into the boat to head home. Some typical terrain in the area. The formerly glacial South Saskatchewan River carves deep into the marine clays and sands of the Bearpaw formation: The nodule, rather unceremoniously wrapped in a wool sock: And unwrapped. Note the cervical vertebra just above the posterior end of the skull, and how part of the end of the snout is missing (sorry about the lack of scale bar, there's a photo further down the post with proper scale): I sent a photo to a paleontologist friend, and was quickly referred to the Royal Saskatchewan Museum, who of course were eager to accept the fossil (not to mention that I was technically legally obliged to hand it over, per the Saskatchewan Heritage Property Act... But it's what I wanted to do anyway!). About a month later, my friend and I met with two other paleontologists down at Lake Diefenbaker to deliver the fossil (this time more carefully wrapped in a shoebox...) and to show them the site where we had found it. One long and wet trip in the zodiac raft later, we were there. We assisted in the collection of more samples, this time coming up with an even broader variety of flora and fauna, including a small crinoid, some wood chips with amber, and some more decapods. One of the two paleontologists was excited to suggest that the locality probably represented a near-shore lagoon environment, and that the museum would likely be back to do some more work there at a later date. Unfortunately, we were unable to do so that summer because of the seasonally rising water levels of the lake, which flooded the site, but I've been told that my friend and I will be invited to assist with the operation again this following season. As for the fossil, it has since been delivered to McGill University to be CT scanned. Apparently, distinguishing the bone from the matrix has been long and tedious work, and not much news has reached us since the specimen was delivered some time last September. Here is an individual slice from the CT scan, from near the back of the braincase - notice how porous the bone material is, which is apparently another indicator that this skull belonged to a juvenile: I have been in close correspondence with the paleontologist from the Royal Sask. Museum who will be writing the paper to describe the find, but everything is more or less at a standstill until the work on the CT scan is finished. It's been a rather long wait, but I'm looking forward to its publication - I have been told that the museum intends to hold a press conference after the specimen has been described, and that my friend and I will be credited and involved in the reveal. So far, the museum has kept everything about the discovery deliberately vague, aside from a brief mention in a press conference, which informed an article that circulated around the Canadian media late last summer: https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/scientists-in-saskatchewan-discover-new-multimillion-year-old-fossils It's been an exciting and fulfilling experience overall, and I can't wait to get back into the field, this time with a more meticulous and careful attitude, knowing that there's scientific potential to be had from my future contributions. Anyway, here are some more photos from the lab at the RSM, with scale bar: Decapod claw: Crinoid crown: Thanks for your attention.
  4. I appreciate all the feed back on my handful of Sulfur River finds and im enjoying being on here and being able to share my love for fossils with y'all. Here is a very special find for me I found it the day after being in a major car accident that I was very lucky to be able to walk away from with only bruises. The Flight museum I use to work for was not to far away from a secret creek that I use to hunt during lunch break, It had earlier formation's of the Western Interior Seaway, Austin Chalk, Kamp Branch etc. I've found several good Ginsu shark teeth aswell as Ptychodus Whip, and other good sharks teeth along with some fish verts and a snout from a baby Mosasaur. So the day after the accident I decided to take my mind off the ordeal by hitting the creek during lunch and feeling blessed I was alive and able to walk so just as im heading out of the creek after finding some teeth I stumbled upon fish scales sticking out of the gravel and picked up this Pycnodont and is a pretty good specimen. So It is a very sentimental piece giving what I was going through when I found it.
  5. Western Interior Sea way finds

    Ive been hunting the Sulfur River for 10 years and here is a small handful of the Sulfur River finds of mine including the partial Toxochelid I found sticking out of the shale and the 35 pieces of shell and a couple pieces of bone I recovered.
  6. Mancos Shale Ammonite: Help Wanted!

    I've been looking for an ID for this big boy. So far I've found this site (http://www.ammonoid.com/Prionocyclus.htm) but I'm not sure what I'm looking for to differentiate between them. Could anybody more knowledgeable help me out?
  7. Coniacian Glyptoxoceras?

    Is anyone aware of any Glyptoxoceras sp. in the Coniacian? @doushantuo, I know that you are good at digging up information like this. Can you find anything?
  8. I have been finding a lot of inclusions in a batch of coprolites from the Smoky Hill Chalk that assumed were bits of cartilage. One of the newer specimens from that batch had a piece of the material in question on the surface; enabling me to view it from the side. They look like little teeth, so now I don't know what I have. I have one other specimen that has a couple of the little tooth-like structures intact (one that I posted a while back that has possible Ptychodus tooth fragments). Is this skin with denticles, cartilage, a skull part or some sort of tooth plate? As always, any help is greatly appreciated.
  9. Possible Goblin Shark?

    It's been a good week for fossiling in New Mexico...found this one in a dry wash in west-central NM. The nearest upstream units were (from nearest to far) kmf-Menefee, kpl-Point Lookout Sandstone and the Satan tongue of the Mancos shale (kms). I've always thought of the Western Interior Seaway as fairly shallow and the shark a deep variety, but the lit says the extant cousin patrols 100m to 1,300m and the WIS was as deep as 750, so there's habitat, I would think. Thoughts? Thanks!
  10. Scientists Are Putting Tens of Thousands of Sea Fossils Online The Western Interior Seaway is gone, but not forgotten Erin Blakemore, Smithsonian Magazine, June 22, 2017 http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/scientists-are-putting-tens-thousands-sea-fossils-online-180963792/ Award Abstract #1645520 Digitization TCN: Collaborative Research: The Cretaceous World: Digitizing Fossils to Reconstruct Evolving Ecosystems in the Western Interior Seaway, National Science Foundation https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1645520&HistoricalAwards=false Yours, Paul H.
  11. From rocks in Colorado, evidence of a 'chaotic solar system' University of Wisconsin-Madison, February 22, 2017 http://news.wisc.edu/from-rocks-in-colorado-evidence-of-a-chaotic-solar-system/ https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/02/170222131512.htm http://www.astrobio.net/also-in-news/rocks-colorado-evidence-chaotic-solar-system/ The paper is: Ma, C., S. R. Meyers, and B. B. Sageman. Theory of chaotic orbital variations confirmed by Cretaceous geological evidence. Nature, 2017; 542 (7642): 468-470 DOI: 10.1038/nature21402 http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v542/n7642/full/nature21402.html Related paper: Sageman, B. B., J. Rich, M. A. Arthur, G. E. Birchfield, and W. E. Dean, 1997, Evidence for Milankovitch Periodicities in Cenomanian-Turonian Lithologic and Geochemical Cycles, Western Interior U.S.A. Journal of Sedimentary Research, Section B: Stratigraphy and Global Studies Vol. 67 (1997) No. 2. (March), Pages 286-302 http://www.earth.northwestern.edu/research/sageman/PDF/97.Sageman.etal.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  12. A news article regarding a newly discovered ceratopsian tooth from Mississippi is available at the following link: http://www.wdam.com/story/32562654/paleontologists-make-big-dinosaur-discovery-in-mississippi The ceratopsian tooth from Mississippi is the second discovery of a Late Cretaceous horned dinosaur from Appalachia. We can't be sure if we didn't put enough effort into finding ceratopsian fossils in marine sediments in the former landmass of Appalachia, or if the ceratopsian discoveries in North Carolina and Mississippi could be reflective of ceratopsian carcasses floating out to sea after they died. Nevertheless, the ceratopsian tooth from Mississippi indicates that some North American horned dinosaurs immigrated to Appalachia from the western interior during the middle Cretaceous.
  13. The Rio Puerco Valley

    The Rio Puerco Valley was my introduction to fossils...it immediately caught my attention...lit a match...became a place I am always eager to revisit...search...learn about... ...and in roaming it, have learned about myself. Many of my adventures in the Puerco are posted here, here...here and here...and here. From here on out, my excursions will be shared here. May you find happiness in your hunting. -P.
  14. While doing a search at Paleobiology Database, I was curious to see if I might find records of marine vertebrates from the Cenomanian-Santonian of the Utah, Montana, Idaho, and Arizona because most tetrapods found in the Cenomanian-Santonian of Nebraska, Kansas, and the Dakotas are primarily mosasaurs, plesiosaurs, pterosaurs, marine turtles, and seagoing birds (e.g. Ichthyornis, Hesperornis) and terrestrial vertebrates have been found in the Western Interior dating from the Cenomanian-Santonian interval (e.g. Oryctodromeus, Eolambia, Sonorasaurus, Albanerpeton cifellii, Nothronychus graffmani, various species of mammals like Ameribataar, and terrestrial lizards). Given the paleogeography of North America during the Cenomanian, would it reasonable to assume that Cenomanian terrestrial tetrapods retreated farther west into areas of Utah, Arizona, Idaho, and Montana that were not covered by the Western Interior Seaway to escape rising sea levels?
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