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Found 153 results

  1. Whale Ear Bone

    I found this in a creek in the Charleston, South Carolina area where I often find sharks teeth and whale bones. I believe the site is Oligocene/Pliocene. If found anywhere else, I would have assumed it was a piece of gravel and tossed it, but it does look a little strange. Perhaps someone with more experience in the Cenozoic can help with the ID. The item is about 3 inches at its longest dimension. Like I said, I am thinking tumbled gravel on this one, but figured that I would check before throwing it in the garden.
  2. Hi, I'm seeking info. I found this about 15 kilometers inland from the Sea of Cortez and 15 kilometers south of Los Barriles, Baja Sur, Mexico. It was on a steep hillside above a small sandy wash or arroyo which will later flow into another and then the Sea, maybe 75 meters elevation. The person who took me to this gully said he has found Megalodon teeth here. It literally looks like a one kilo stack of tortillas, same size, dimension and layering. It's about 20 centimeters in diameter and 5 centimeters tall. I have found whale discs before but only on fresh skeletons and this does look similar but perhaps it's just a sedimentary deposit. I also found what appeared to be a rib about one meter in length but broken into about 8 pieces along with a few other pieces that didn't look like they belonged. I'm not sure about the geology. Appeared be banded horizontal layers with a surprising amount of some type of crystal that looked like selenite or calcite.
  3. Whale Phalanx

    From the album Calvert Cliffs

    Baleen Whale Phalanx Bone Parvorder Mysticeti Miocene Virginia
  4. Whale vertebra?

    I was in a Texas museum yesterday and was looking at a case of primarily pleistocene fossils. This vertebrae was labeled mastodon, but really doesn't look like any mastodon vertebrae that I've seen. We don't generally find whale vertebrae where i look for fossils, but this hits me and I definitely don't know whale, as possibly whale? Vertical thickness is approximately 4-5 inches, 10-12cm. There is no other labeling other than mastodon. Sorry for the quality of the photos, dark lighting and a hand held camera.
  5. Fossil whale bone (specific bone ID)

    Hello all, So i've recently come into the possession of this chunk of bone, and based on the size, porosity, and locality (York River State Park) I believe it's a whale bone (Miocene-Pleistocene in age, likely a mysticete). My question is, which bone exactly is it? It seems to have some fairly distinctive features that seem to lend towards identification, but after around two days of research i'm stumped. I'm thinking it could be anything but some vertebral element, but i'm not sure. Any help is greatly appreciated.
  6. Hey all, The Calvert Cliffs have been falling left and right recently. Countless cliff slides have led to plenty of new material becoming accessible on the beaches, but the unstable cliffs also call for extra caution. I decided to return to my favorite winter hunting location, Bayfront Park, to try and take advantage of the cliff falls. I thought it would be a good opportunity to film my first YouTube video, which I have been wanting to do for a while, so I brought my new handheld camera mount. Peak low tide was exactly at sunrise, so I woke up at 4 a.m. in order to arrive at the beach before then. Early mornings can be rough, but if you're getting up to do something you love it's a whole lot easier. When I got to the parking lot, it was still very dark and I actually had to use my phone's flashlight to hunt for the first few minutes before the sun began its ascent into the horizon. It was a very cloudy day, so unfortunately I wasn't treated with one of the gorgeous Brownies sunrises. Within 10 or 15 minutes or searching, I found one of the biggest teeth I've ever found at Brownies, a huge 2 inch mako in perfect condition. That's when I knew it was going to be a good day. Not too long after that, I stumbled across a circular object slightly covered by sand. It looked like it could be some kind of vertebra or possible a "cookie" (dolphin epiphysis), but there was only one way to find out. When I tried pulling it out, it didn't budge. I pulled harder. As it still wouldn't come out, I realized it must be much larger than it appeared on the surface. Throwing aside the rock next to it, I finally pulled out a beautiful cetacean vertebra! I've always wanted to find one, especially after running into a guy who found a dozen of them on my last Brownies trip, so I was ecstatic. I continued finding some very nice teeth. I also found another cetacean vertebra, this time a very different shape but in very good condition. Despite the harsh temperature and dangerous cliffs, there were quite a few other hunters out on the beach. At one point I ran into a man who had found two perfects Megs, each one about 2 inches. I hoped to find one for myself, but had no such luck. Regardless, I was extremely content with everything I found and began to make my way back to the car. This trip was one to remember, not only because of the awesome finds, but also the fun experience of filming the video. I kept this trip report rather short, because the video covers the detail I usually go into, and then some. Anyway, I've wanted to become a fossil hunting YouTuber pretty much ever since I began hunting, but I just never really got around to it until now. I love watching YouTubers like @addicted2fossils, and I hope others will find my videos to be entertaining and educational as well. I've posted the link to my video below, and I would really appreciate it if you would take a second to like the video, leave a comment, and subscribe to my channel. I'll be putting out many videos like this in the future. I have some very exciting trips coming up, including hunting at a private creek site and going to the annual Aurora Fossil Festival in NC! Stay tuned. Hoppe hunting!
  7. Large Whale Bone to Stabilize

    I found this beautiful whale vertebra this weekend. It fell out of the cliff face just a few days ago and tumbled into the Potomac River (brackish?) just far enough for the waves at the tide line to gently lapped it clean. Gotta love it! It is currently soaking in clean water to get the salt and anything else out as much as I can, but I've never done anything this big before. I'm used to stabilizing little stuff and blocks of matrix that really just need a thick, hard outer shell. The little bones air dry quickly enough that I don't have to worry about moisture at the center, but this thing is 4 1/2 inches in diameter! I have both Paleobond and Paraloid on hand. Anyone have any practice at this?
  8. Exploring the Virginia Miocene

    Spent a cold, soggy day on a private trip along the Potomac yesterday. The mud was so saturated that we were sinking up to our knees where the sand met the mud at the base of the cliffs. It was totally worth it! Came home with treasures untold until I finish unpacking. I know there are some really nice whale vertebrae in there, including the one below. There are also a couple nice Ephora snails and what looks like maybe an echinoid -- really rare for the area if it is! My daughter found a couple snaggletooth shark teeth that are actually iridescent and blew me away! Here's a video report of the trip: Sorry I can't say specifically where this is. They are having problems with uninvited guests already.
  9. Unknown whale species

    Found out at a land site in Summerville SC so not sure what layer it came from, but was found among Megs and angustidens and a few others. Was wondering if anyone had a better guess at what species of whale this came from, my Google researching didn't really pull up anything that looked terribly close.
  10. Whale Tooth?

    I was looking over some fossils in my collection, and can't remember where the heck I found this. I was thinking it is some type of whale tooth, but ..... it really doesn't look too much like the others I have found. I would greatly appreciate y'alls opinion. It is the lower item in the pictures. Thanks in advance
  11. Sharktooth Hill Cetacean Ear Bone

    I know this is a cetacean ear bone and I know it is from Sharktooth Hill but that is ablut all I know for sure. It is pretty large at 3" long and 1.5'' wide which would seem to rule out of the smaller dolphin-like whales. My first thought was Aulophyseter morreci. It could also be a mysticeti as well. Regardless of species, it is a really nice addition to our STH whale collection.
  12. IMG_0871BVbrownWhale2.jpg

    From the album FloridaWhales

    Order: Artiodactyl Infraorder: Cetecea Family: Physeteridae Genus: Unknown Species: Unknown Whale tooth, Length 10.7 cm, 4.2 Inches One in a box of broken Whale teeth found in Bone Valley Phosphate Mine in the 2000s
  13. IMG_0890BVWhaleTxt.jpg

    From the album FloridaWhales

    Order: Artiodactyl Infraorder: Cetecea Family: Physeteridae Genus: Scaldicetus .sp Whale tooth, Length 10.7 cm, 4.2 Inches One in a box of broken Whale teeth found in Bone Valley Phosphate Mine in the 2000s
  14. Decided to spend a couple minutes searching some of my favourite spots alone Big Bay beach in Cape Town and came away with some megalodon teeth fragments,a mako and a whale eardrum. If anyone wants clearer pictures or wants to see some of my other finds from searching this months feel free to pm. regards Pamar.
  15. Possible whale vertebra? It's huge!

    Hi everyone I found this huge, possible vertebra today and would really like some help with the ID. I'm thinking it might be a whale. I'm not too sure but I think the area is Miocene but I also see references to Cretaceous. This is from the South Island of New Zealand. It's about 10inches wide (25cm). Thanks!
  16. Whale tooth?

    Hey everybody, prepare for a series of ID requests as I've had a number of fossils from my collection piling up on my desk waiting to be posted. Here's what I believe is an odontocete tooth from the spoil pits across the street from the aurora fossil museum. It appears to be pretty worn and only has a small patch of enamel left on the end. The piece is about 4 cm long from tip to tip.
  17. Florida Whale Jaw

    When you have a lot of fossil friends, you get involved in fossil stuff, which is a joy. So, I have a friend who found in 2004, a Baleen Whale Jaw 20-25 feet below current land in a lake bed for housing development. Sounds like Miocene to me. I love Whale. He knows that and offered to sell me the jaw. It is out of my price range for fossil acquisitions. I told him that I would try to get the jaw identified or at least get some options. The jaw seems complete and is a tad over 6 feet in length. He and friends performed a LOT of work to retrieve it from the muck with as few breaks as possible, stabilize the pieces, mount it for display. There is value for me just to have the photos. So, I will tell you that in the Plaster Jacket Newsletter, Sept 1978 , Gary Morgan for the Florida Paleontology Society, stated ".. a nearly complete mandible of Baleanoptera floridana, more than 6 feet in length was found near Pierce, in Polk County, Florida..." and if this fossil is from an adult, it is not the equivalent of Blue, Grey, Fin, or Sei whales today. A 6 foot mandible is relatively small for a Baleen Whale. I guess it could be a juvenile. B. Floridana has been merged into B. Cortesii . That is as much as I know/guess and hoping a whale expert can add something to the identification. @siteseer @Boesse
  18. What am I

    I picked this up in a box of junk from an auction. I believe its a whale vertebrae its quite heavy it measures 20cm x 11cm does anybody know is it a fossil and what is it from if its not a whale. If it is a whale do you know what kind it could be
  19. Mammal Tooth

    Found this tooth/tusk in South Carolina off the coast of Tybee Island. We went with a guide and she said it was the tooth of a Jaguar, but she said to check on here to be sure!I think it looks like a whale tooth but it is much thicker than many I have seen.
  20. A fossil named after Burke Museum curator tells whale of a tale about evolution By Alan Boyle, GreekWire, November 30, 2018 https://www.geekwire.com/2018/fossil-named-burke-museum-curator-tells-whale-tale-evolution/ Ancient whale named for UW paleontologist Elizabeth Nesbitt Hannah Hickey, University of Washington News https://www.washington.edu/news/2018/12/10/ancient-whale-named-for-uw-paleontologist-elizabeth-nesbitt/ Newly-Described Fossil Whale Named After Burke Curator Burke Museum Public Relation http://www.burkemuseum.org/press/newly-described-fossil-whale-named-after-burke-curator The paper is: Peredo, C.M., Pyenson, N.D., Marshall, C.D. and Uhen, M.D., 2018. Tooth Loss Precedes the Origin of Baleen in Whales. Current Biology. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0960982218314143 Happy New Year, Paul H.
  21. Found this today in Parrish, Fl. 1.5” long. Dolphin tooth?
  22. Unknown Cetacean Fossil

    This is a fossil of unknown origin, it was allegedly found burried in sand near the shore of the Chesapeake Bay in Virginia; or possibly on the banks of the James River. The previous owner believed it to be an intervertebral disc of some kind of whale. It is clearly fossilized and has some areas encrusted with a sand like mineral. It also has a few spots where a shiny black mineral has been deposited. Can anyone provide an identification and possible an estimated age?
  23. Unusual Miocene Odontocete Tooth

    Hi, This tooth was found at Bayfront Park/Brownies Beach, which is Calvert Formation (~18-22 MYA). It is clearly from an odontocete, but it is unlike any other I've found from this location, or anywhere for that matter. The crown is not perfectly conical, instead having a rather wide appearance. But what really makes this tooth so odd is the root. It is flattened and bumpy, while most odontocete teeth have long, smooth roots like those of human teeth (this obviously makes sense, as they are both mammals). The fossil is about 3/4" from the tip of the crown to the bottom of the root. If you look closely (it may be difficult to see in the pictures provided), it almost looks like the tooth is encased within the root, and could be pulled out. This at first led me to consider the possibility that the strange flat part may actually just be matrix and the fossil is just a typical odontocete tooth not fully uncovered. However, after further inspection I am confident that everything is fossilized and the entire fossil is a single tooth. So now the only questions are what animal did this tooth belong to and why is it so unusual in appearance? I am certainly hoping that it may be a small Squalodon tooth because I've never found one and I think they're just awesome. Any information is appreciated, as always. Thank you!
  24. Venice scuba finds

    Did some diving off Venice, FL over the summer before the red tide got too bad. I got a lot of small teeth but a good number of megs and other fossils. My biggest tooth, a little over 4.5 inches: A nice golden beach tooth: A whale tooth:
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