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Found 129 results

  1. Venice scuba finds

    Did some diving off Venice, FL over the summer before the red tide got too bad. I got a lot of small teeth but a good number of megs and other fossils. My biggest tooth, a little over 4.5 inches: A nice golden beach tooth: A whale tooth:
  2. Dolphin/Whale Periotic Bone

    From the album Calvert Cliffs

    Choptank Formation Virginia Miocene Photographed exactly as found, with brilliant, polished surface when dry! Collected on private property with permission.
  3. Whale tooth

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Unidentified Eocene whale tooth if anyone has any thoughts on what it's from, please feel free to let me know!
  4. A Jaw Fragment

    I was hunting with a couple of TFF friends doing a ground search in an area that produces 90% marine fossils, Megs, Makos, but no GWs, Whale /Dolphin earbones and vertebrate, ray teeth, fish verts, dugong rib bones with a few mammal bones and teeth, primarily horse. I found this jaw section: My initial take was whale, but then too small for whale and I switched to gator. I have seen no alligator teeth and lots of whale material. Is there anything besides size that would confirm or eliminate one or the other ?. Thanks for comments, suggestions, IDs.
  5. Basilosauridae partial vertebrae

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Side view of vertebra, displaying missing piece see 1st picture for information
  6. Basilosauridae partial vertebrae

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    View of damaged surface see 1st picture for information
  7. Basilosauridae partial vertebrae

    From the album Marine reptiles and mammals

    Vertebrae damaged during or before fossilization, from a basilosauridae. Found in Albany, GA, in the Ocala limestone formation, an Eocene deposit laid down by the swannee current between about 34-56 mya. The exact species is possibly still up in the air, since it is been suggested that it is something other than the original ID. We're still looking into the possibilities. Found in Georgia, so that limits the possibilities, but still leaves open a number of basilosauridae, including some dorudontinae such as Zygorhiza. Zygorhiza, which is what it was originally supposed to be, is iffy since it hasn't officially ever been found in GA, but I don't think that means it hasn't, doesn't that just mean it hasn't been found by scientific authorities, or confirmed by such? it seems however, that the person who ID'd it as Zygorhiza was Professor Mark Uhen, who I guess is an authority on the subject, but as before, they're not supposed to be found in GA. Another possibility from a different authority on the subject has ID'd it as Cynthiacetus, which I personally would prefer, but sadly that doesn't have any impact in the matter:(
  8. A couple of Ws

    I had the pleasure of meeting a Florida Fossil Expert and dealer of 50 years. I went to his home and viewed many amazing treasures including numerous high quality 6 inch Megs . I also picked up 2 fossils for my collection: A whale tooth from a Bone Valley phosphate mine and a Walrus Tusk Tip from SMR Aggregates Quarry west of Sarasota. Both were found in the 1980s. I love whale and previously had no walrus. At first, I thought that this looks a lot like the heavily fossilized Dugong ribs that I find in the Peace River, but in looking closely at the shape, ridges, texture of the fossil, I believe it fits the identification of Walrus. This is a request ID thread. Let me know what you think. Thanks Jack
  9. need an I'd. PETRIFIED whale bone?

    I have property off the central California coast in Monterey County. I have found sharks teeth, hundreds of various shells encased in shale on the property. But this is new to me. I was digging out a new trench for a water line and came across this. Very heavy. to me it definitely seems petrified.Many thanks to you all. -David
  10. What the heck?

    Found this today at Purse State Park, MD. Is this an ichthyosaur tooth? A whale tooth? I have nooooooooo idea.
  11. Basilosaurus? Zygorhiza?

    Any ideas? These are the only 4 pictures. I don't know if the back was lost pre or post fossilization.
  12. Two recent finds from Cooper River SC

    Hello Forum Friends, I've got two recent finds, found during a dive trip to the Cooper river, that I'd like to I.D.. The first is very tiny, 5 ~ 6 mm on the long edge, with an unusual pattern (it's difficult to photograph something so small). The 2nd item, I believe may be a whale tooth frag. it's pretty worn, and split. The inner structure is visible.
  13. Hi! I’m new on here and not super familiar with fossils. However, today I was walking on the beach in Hatteras Village, Hatteras Island, North Carolina (a part of the Outerbanks). I stumbled upon what appears to be an old bone of some sort. For the life of me, I can’t figure out what type of bone it is/which animal it is from. Any ideas?? The photo is posted below. For some reason, the other photos won’t upload, so I will try to upload them in the replies hopefully.
  14. Fossilized Whale Bone?

    HI. I'm a rock hunter and found some fossils along the way but it's not my expertise. This may be a rock but I'll let the Forum decide. This piece is about 1 1/4" long by 3/4" wide and is blackish with a rust color interior on the broken end. I found it on the Dunedin Causeway, Florida and it resembles whale bone that I've found in the Venice Beach area, but it doesn't have the ocean tumbled shape. What do you think??? Thanks again, BronzViking
  15. Hawthorne whale bone

    So I've had this guy for almost a year, this being one of the whale bones I've gotten from Summerville, SC. With its odd shape, I've been puzzled as to what bone in the whale it was: Flip side: End with protrusion: Flip:
  16. Hi all! The Mace Brown Museum of Natural History will have a table in the community center this saturday at the Aurora Fossil Festival. I'm currently trying to write up the marine mammal assemblage from Belgrade Quarry, which appears to be transitional between the upper Oligocene Chandler Bridge Formation here in Charleston and the late early Miocene assemblage from the Pungo River Formation in the Lee Creek Mine. Bring your Belgrade marine mammal specimens to our table, I'd like to see them! Several members of this group and the exceedingly generous North Carolina Fossil Club have already donated a bunch of great specimens including earbones and teeth. Also, I just realized I accidentally left @sixgill pete off of this flyer - thanks to him as well!
  17. Rib Fossil

    I found this in grey clay. Thoughts on species?
  18. Bone joint?

    Found this while hunting shark teeth today. It seems like a joint of some sort but the question is, of what?
  19. Blue what vert?

    So, found just the disc part sticking up from the bottom of the marl. I knew what it was and started digging around it and found all three sides to it extending. However, after an hour of digging around it and down 3.5 inches I discovered it was broken apart and pulled just the vert part out. I will be going back to pull the other sides out, but the disc part measures 3" across and 3.5" deep/length. From what I have read up on tonight seems it is from a blue whale. I was 20 miles from the coast of Charleston, Ladson area. Many ripples of Eocene, guessing, possibly Miocene. Along with this there were many scattered rib bones, found great white teeth, and nice verts around 1". Am I correct in guessing Blue Whale dermal vert.?
  20. https://www.upi.com/Science_News/2018/04/18/New-species-of-ancient-whale-found-in-New-Zealand/8111524066374/?utm_source=sec&utm_campaign=sl&utm_medium=2 https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180418100507.htm
  21. We went out fossil hunting and found these two bones in the wash along a beach on the Chesapeake Bay in Calvert County, MD by the Cliffs. Any help with identification is appreciated. Thanks. Below is the first bone.
  22. Easter Suprise

    My best hunt to date: After family events, I had some time to go hunting today (easter), the first warm time I’ve had to hunt when I actually knew what I was doing. The tide was not ideal, but not dangerous. As I walked down the beach, many where there Hunting. I correctly assumed that these were mostly normal beach goers, and I was down south alone with few fresh footprints. I walked the whole length, it took about an hour forty to the end and back. As I walked, I found a nice common thresher and I cracked a grin. I found another and that kept the smile. I then found a complete cow shark tooth and was rather chuffed, and then BANG! MEG! My first after half a year of hunting the cliffs. It’s worn and has been stress fractures, most would not hold it in high esteem but being my first I was ecstatic! This meg will always hold a special place in my heart. I said a quick prayer and continued forth not caring if I found anything else, my trip had already been made. Then I found some decent White sharks, which I have for some reason been missing. Some nice hemis hopped into my view as well. Eventually I decided it was time to go back. On the way back I noticed someone had put a block of a hard clay (actually more of a limestone I think) on a small boulder. I took a look and saw there was a chunk of bone in it! This was a little over 1.75 miles from the entrance, so someone must have picked it up, realized it wasn’t worth the trouble and left it. I’m not so easily detered. So I carried this ungainly 20 pound mass ( I’m in the tennis team so you can infer my strength) the almost two miles through the highish tide which concealed under water boulders. Perhaps stupid, but worth it. I felt pride from the strange looks I got from the beach goers, perhaps they thought I had found something important. Any way I’m going to photograph everything tomorrow but here’s what I have now, enjoy.
  23. Are These Whale?

    Hello, Found these at Glenafric, in North Canterbury, New Zealand. These large rocks had only recently dislodged in high seas. They are entirely made up of shell fragments and I assume these 'bones' were deposited on top. Thanks, Allan
  24. I've been wanting to get back to the Peace River since I first ventured out this fossil hunting season back in early February. Back then the water was over a foot higher and much colder--the air temps were in the mid-60s and the water was a chilly 62F. I decided this was a good day to test my new chest-high waders. I ventured into a spot I like to visit when I'm on this section of the Peace as it has some pretty coarse gravel. While it doesn't produce a lot of finds they tend to me more interesting. I waded out to the small patch of gravel at the leading edge of a sandbar but before I could reach the spot I found myself on tippy-toes trying to find a shallow path while the water rose to within an inch or so of the top of my waders. Somehow gathering more than my usual amount of common sense I decided to turn around rather than risk scuttling my new waders with a catastrophic flood. While searching around for another path to this gravel exposure I tried various approached though none were successful in attaining the desired location in the river that was tantalizingly close. While I walk the river I usually have my fiberglass probe (The Probulator 3000TM) in one hand pushing the tip into the sand with each step to test for any gravel crunch. Much to my surprise I was detecting a decent layer of gravel well downstream from the tiny outcrop on the leading upstream edge of the sandbar where I usually hunt. I have probed around this area before and only detected sand save for this one tiny area. Though I had found gravel in water that was a bit shallower I couldn't stay long as I had to be real careful to not bend over much while digging for gravel as it would have meant cold water down the waders. I couldn't lift as much with my legs and my lower back was soon very vocal in its complaint of the shifted workload. My upper body was also getting quite chilled as my long-sleeved shirt (good for solar protection) was getting soaked as usual but the brisk breeze was doing an efficient job at evaporative cooling quickly dropping my core body temp. I could only work for about 15-20 minute blocks before having to sit in the canoe and try to warm up my gradually numbing fingers. Instead, I conceded and made a mental not to return to investigate this increased exposure of gravel next time. I had hoped to get out last weekend but there was a bit of a cold front moving through Florida and the chance for rain shifted from late Saturday and on into Sunday to instead start mid-morning. I've been on the Peace when passing showers have opened up and spilled some precipitation down from above--not so bad on a warm day but not optimal for preserving core body temperature on a cooler day. Saint Patrick's Day weekend looked to have weather much more conducive to standing around half submerged in a river. The water temperature had risen to a relatively balmy 70F and the air temp was forecast to be an unseasonably warm 85F--unexpected as this was still technically winter with the Spring Equinox still two days hence. I had guests visiting and staying over on Friday night so it was not possible to get to the river on Saturday as I usually do but Sunday was clear. The morning started off a bit cool. I was up at 3:30am and out the door by 4:00am. The trip cross-state over the top of Lake Okeechobee and on into Arcadia was quiet (as it usually is that time of morning). I usually monitor the outside air temp on the car thermometer and watch it dip as I leave coastal Florida and cross over through its less populated center. I usually expect the temps to dip several degrees but this time I went from 67F as I left my neighborhood to the usual dip to near 60F. This time it continued even more and bottomed out at the nadir of 49F for a brief moment before rebounding into the 60s as we approached Arcadia. Most of the trip on two lane highway 70 was made more interesting by a thick coat of fog that approached white-out conditions a few times. It can be rather difficult to locate the road when the oncoming headlights of an approaching vehicle light swirling fog in an effect worthy of a Pink Floyd concert from the 1970's. We arrived without issue and went through the normal procedure of checking in at Canoe Outpost and riding the old blue school bus with canoe-laden trailer in tow to Brownville Park where we departed from the boat ramp into a white ethereal mist. For some reason the Earl Scruggs song "Foggy Mountain Breakdown" came to mind. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yQIJuu3N5EY Since we decided not to spend time at our normal spots further upstream, we soon left the rest of the canoes in our group as we headed off downstream into the dreamlike fog. The heavy mist also muffled sounds a bit so it was peacefully quiet and most befitting of its name. For some time we heard nothing more than the sounds of our paddles and a few species of birds calling. It was well worth the effort of the early departure just to experience this quiet time on the river. We saw some ducks who took to flight at our approach and enjoyed seeing some Great Blue Herons, Great Egrets, and Little Blue Herons hunting for a fishy breakfast along the banks of the river. There were lots of Cardinals, Gray Catbirds, and Belted Kingfishers in the trees that we would frequently spot flitting about or calling out to each other. Tammy mentioned that in all of the trips down the Peace that we had never seen an owl and she wished that for once she could see one here. Apparently, the officials at the Wish Granting Department had a light schedule this morning as, within 5 minutes of uttering this desire, she looked up into a tree at the edge of the river to spot a Barred Owl watching from its perch as we floated by. I pulled out the camera and we circled back for the photo. As we were leaving we saw the bird take flight. It is amazing how a bird this size can move on such stealthy wings as to be so utterly silent in flight. Our morning was made and I hadn't even broken out the shovel & sifting screen nor dipped foot into the water yet. I figured if this was a day for wishing that I'd put in my order for a reasonably complete mastodon tooth. These teeth are seemingly as fragile as mammoth teeth and mostly I've only found small but very distinctive (because of their thick pearlescent enamel in cross-section) chunks. I was fortunate enough to find a complete Colombian Mammoth tooth a few years back with John @Sacha but mastodon in anything but tiny fragments has so far eluded me. I made my wish and we continued to our destination. In time we made it down to my favorite sandbar and spent this entire trip focusing on seeing what this gravel had to offer. I couldn't determine if this was a new extended layer of fresh gravel that Hurricane Irma had chosen to spread out more evenly across the top of this sandbar or if the storm (and ensuing raging torrent) had stripped off a thick cap of sand uncovering an older previously-inaccessible gravel layer underneath. The water was lower that last time (and quite a bit warmer). No waders this time and after a few minutes for by legs to acclimate (read this as "becoming numb") I slowly worked my way into deeper water probing around with the Probulator and mapping out the extend of this newly expanded gravel. Tammy (being the wiser of the two) decided the morning was still too chilly for direct skin contact chose to sit in the canoe at the side of the river and drink from her thermos of hot tea. The river flow at this point in the river was nearly imperceptible (my tethered sifting screen occasionally floating slowly upstream rather than downstream). Being creative, Tammy decided that she could paddle out and position the canoe nearby and see what I was doing without the discomfort of standing in a river on a chilly morning before the sun was able to warm things up sufficiently. The sun finally burned off the morning fog and before long the sun's rays were counteracting the chilly water making the environmental conditions near optimal for standing around in a river. I got to work scouting out the extents of the gravel and picking some novel spots that I'd not dug before to see if I could detect some virgin gravel with worthy finds (nothing is worse than digging in spoil pile gravel with all of the work and none of the payoff). Before long some nice finds started appearing in the sifting screen. Because of the chunkiness of the gravel at this spot I choose to use my sifting screen with the 1/2" mesh rather than the finer 1/4" mesh screen. As a result, I found almost no smaller shark teeth (just a few larger ones that were not small enough to slip between the mesh back into the Peace). The gravel in this extended area was just as chunky as the former minor occurrence at the leading edge of the sandbar. It can bit a bit difficult to get a shovel into and a lot of wiggling around of the handle is necessary to slowly work the tip of the spade down between the stony chunks. Every now and then a shovel size chunk of matrix comes up on the shovel and threatens to sink the sifting screen with its bulk. I've learned to toss these behind me with reasonable care so as not to spray myself with the resultant depth-charge splash of chucking these bowling ball size chunks with too much vigor. There are some days on the Peace when even somewhat common items like horse teeth can be elusive. Today was not one of those days. The first horse tooth was a nice specimen of an upper Equus molar. It was soon followed by a nice lower Equus (the lowers are more thin and elongate to fit into the more narrow mandible). You can see the comparison of the two below.
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