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Found 171 results

  1. Possible whale tooth?

    Found this guy yesterday looking for shark teeth. I’m guessing some kind of whale but need help with this one.
  2. Burrowing echinoderm?

    From the album Macro Florida Fossils

    I found this whale vertebrae with a lot of burrowing damage. I'm not sure if these pebbles I found inside are rocks or echinoderms.
  3. whale squamosal

    From the album Macro Florida Fossils

  4. Sharktooth Hill Whale Vertebra

    Earlier this summer I had a chance to dig at Slow Curve at Ernst Quarries. A few teeth were found along with a small dolphin vertebra, but the best find was this large whale(?) vertebra I pulled out as the rain clouds were quickly approaching. From my internet research, I believe it is a whale lumbar vertebra, but that is all I could determine. Whatever it is, I feel lucky to have found it and want to know as much as I can about it! Is there any chance to pin down anything more specific about this piece, such as species? Ideally, I would like to reconstruct the broken processes and make a display. Are there any collections of images for whale vertebrae that could also help with identification? (I couldn't find any good sources while searching) Am I correct in thinking the two parallel broken processes in the second image were the top (dorsal?) of the bone? Is it possible to tell which way the bone faced toward the head and tail originally? I appreciate any help that you guys and gals can provide! Each of the photos has a US quarter, Euro, and centimeter scale for reference. (I first tried photos with lights on both sides, but then the shape of the vertebra was very difficult to see.)
  5. I was fortunate enough to travel to Ernst Quarry near Bakersfield and spend a day digging at Slow Curve. In that day I came away with a LOT of teeth and a promise to return at some point in the future. I have a better idea how to approach the site now, and I want to find that elusive Megalodon tooth that I missed this time around. I went with a family member, and we found a lot of teeth. I did a rough count at over 350 teeth total (that does include partials), with the grand majority being very small. Which was perfect for me because I ended up using 3 gem boxes for everything when I'd originally planned for two haha. Lots of makos (big tooth, hooked, and a couple narrow toothed), tiger shark, basking shark, requiem and black tip sharks, Dasyuris and myliobatiformes rays, 1 porpoise tooth, 1 whale tooth, angel shark teeth, six gill and seven gill shark, and 1 Hemipristis. I found a TON of bone fragments. I couldn't pick them all up of course, but I tried to pick up most of the larger ones with a few smaller pieces to. I have such a hard time leaving any fossil behind. Also found 2 small fish verts and a larger shark (I think) vertebrae. Along with a couple partial whale vertebraes and there might be an astragalus sitting in there to. A couple of my rib pieces have feeding wear on them. No super big teeth, but my biggest guy was a tad over 1.5 inches. The color of all the teeth astounds me. It's like I have a paint pallette of teeth. Whites, beige, tan, orange, pink, blueish, purple, etc. My favorite tooth is a smaller little guy, but he has a mix of purple and white color with white and black lines across him (see below). All in all it was a very productive day, especially since it was my first time out there. It'll probably be a while before I can come back, but I know I will be back again some day.
  6. Hi! I made a small visit to the Natural History Museum in Maastricht today to visit the new small exhibition named "Whale: Locality Maastricht" which centers around some Eocene whale bones from an undescribed whale found in the ENCI quarry in Maastricht. The exhibition explores further into the evolution of whales, it's a small exhibition but worth a visit if you haven't seen the museum or if you are really interested in whale evolution. Should any of our Dutch, Belgian & German members decide to visit (or international members who are in the area), then you should really grab a copy of the exhibition book. It is really cool and informative, it's only €2,50 but 125 pages long (both in dutch & english) and it covers the evolution of whales, the ENCI whale, modern whales & their biology and about whaling and whales in human history & myth. The exhibition book alone is well worth the visit in my opinion, I kinda compare it with the EOS magazine about Iguanodons & the book "Mammoths: ice age giants by Adrian Lister" but then about whales. So here are the photo's I made of the exhibition. The Exhibition Room: left: Metepocetus sp. neurocranium with preserved ear bones from Liessel in the Netherlands (Miocene) Right: Isoluted vertebrae of various whale species from Liessel in the Netherlands (Miocene) Isolated vertebrae of Eocene primordial whales (Archaeoceti) dredged from the buttom of the North Sea, for comparison with those of the "ENCI whale" Isolated vertebrae of Eocene primordial whales (Archaeoceti) dredged from the buttom of the North Sea, for comparison with those of the "ENCI whale" Smallest jaw: possibly Dorudon sp. from the late Eocene of Ad Dakhla in Morocco. Bigger jaw: possibly Pappocetus lugardi, from the middle Eocene of Ben Gueran in Morocco.
  7. St. Marys Scuba diving

    I dove the St. Marys river last weekend. This was my second time diving the river and it did not disappoint. My biggest tooth is a little under 5.5 inches.
  8. Whale vertebrae?

    I’m pretty sure this is a whale vertebrae but would love if someone with more experience could give a positive I’d on what it is I would truly appreciate it !! The fossils dimensions are 5’height 4’wide and 3.5 thick found in Summerville South Carolina sawmill creek
  9. Looking to get an ID on this little guy...is it just an extremely worn sharks tooth stripped of its enamel? Whale tooth? Porpoise tooth? Found on the beaches of Wilmington, NC, in dredged material. It was definitely something at some point in time!
  10. Fish teeth? Whale teeth?

    Found a few of these teeth on the beach (dredged material) in Wilmington, NC. They seem awfully small to be whale teeth. Anyone?
  11. Whale Tooth Info

    On Tuesday I was at a site near Sara’s, Florida collecting shark teeth and dugong bones. I met a nice older woman at the site who collects at 3 different counties around Sarasota. When I was leaving, I gave her some Mazon Creek fossils and a few Mississippian fossils that I collected from Anna and Vienna, Illinois. As I was about to drive away, she called me over and gave me this whale tooth that she stated was collected at a different site. I am just looking for and other info on this tooth. @Boesse can you help? Thanks
  12. "Mammal Tooth" Shark-tooth Hill

    Mammals make up the bulk of my knowledge, but for this specimen I'm clueless. I'm thinking from the locality and the general look of the tooth it could be whale of some sort, possibly a dolphin? Allegedly it was found in Bakersfield California, Shark-tooth hill. I don't own this fossil so these pictures are the best I can get unless I purchase it, what do you guys think it is?
  13. ID help

    I’m in need of some help on some old finds from Aurora. I thought shark nose, crocodile, whale tooth, what do you think.
  14. Whale inner ear?

    Hey all! I was visiting a friend who owns a local rock and gem shop here in Edmonton. I guess he had purchased a small storage locker of Canadian minerals from a couple who bought a shop in the 70’s. In one one of the boxes was this weird thing. I asked him if he knew what it was and he had no information for it. No idea where it came from or what it even was. I asked if he would sell it to me and he said sure. I have a feeling it’s a whale’s inner ear bone?? Any help?
  15. Hi all I purchased this cetacean skull fragment from a person who collected it in South Carolina many, many years ago. She said that she found it specifically in the ACE basin (Ashepoo, Combahee, Edisto Basin) while diving. I want to see if anyone can help me identify the species. I figure it's a cetacean skull, likely from an odontocete (?sperm whale or relative), and possibly consists of the premaxillary bones (with the large fossa for the melon) and others. I've included a number of photos. It measures 16 in long, 8 in wide, and 7 in tall and weighs over 13 lbs. Any information would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  16. Big Fossil from Denmark

    Imagine to pull this out from a block of clay, in a warm day in may. After just 30 minutes, i pulled this thing out from the clay in Gram claypit. This whale vertebrae is very rare in Denmark, and only few are found every year in the claypit I was so lucky! The clay is from miocene, and snails, shells are common. Also shark teeth can be found. What do you think?
  17. Whale Bone Trade

    I've been trying to put together a collection of state fossils. Two states claim Basilosaurus and Vermont claims Delphinapterus . I have Miocene whale bones from VA and MD - broken vertebrae, ribs, and skull fragments and a complete dolphin periodic I'm willing to part with. Still working on the more complete vert pictures, but PM me if you want to see them. Don't need anything in perfect condition, fragments are fine. Anyone have anything to spare?
  18. Whale Ear Bone

    I found this in a creek in the Charleston, South Carolina area where I often find sharks teeth and whale bones. I believe the site is Oligocene/Pliocene. If found anywhere else, I would have assumed it was a piece of gravel and tossed it, but it does look a little strange. Perhaps someone with more experience in the Cenozoic can help with the ID. The item is about 3 inches at its longest dimension. Like I said, I am thinking tumbled gravel on this one, but figured that I would check before throwing it in the garden.
  19. Hi, I'm seeking info. I found this about 15 kilometers inland from the Sea of Cortez and 15 kilometers south of Los Barriles, Baja Sur, Mexico. It was on a steep hillside above a small sandy wash or arroyo which will later flow into another and then the Sea, maybe 75 meters elevation. The person who took me to this gully said he has found Megalodon teeth here. It literally looks like a one kilo stack of tortillas, same size, dimension and layering. It's about 20 centimeters in diameter and 5 centimeters tall. I have found whale discs before but only on fresh skeletons and this does look similar but perhaps it's just a sedimentary deposit. I also found what appeared to be a rib about one meter in length but broken into about 8 pieces along with a few other pieces that didn't look like they belonged. I'm not sure about the geology. Appeared be banded horizontal layers with a surprising amount of some type of crystal that looked like selenite or calcite.
  20. Whale Phalanx

    From the album Calvert Cliffs

    Baleen Whale Phalanx Bone Parvorder Mysticeti Miocene Virginia
  21. Whale vertebra?

    I was in a Texas museum yesterday and was looking at a case of primarily pleistocene fossils. This vertebrae was labeled mastodon, but really doesn't look like any mastodon vertebrae that I've seen. We don't generally find whale vertebrae where i look for fossils, but this hits me and I definitely don't know whale, as possibly whale? Vertical thickness is approximately 4-5 inches, 10-12cm. There is no other labeling other than mastodon. Sorry for the quality of the photos, dark lighting and a hand held camera.
  22. Fossil whale bone (specific bone ID)

    Hello all, So i've recently come into the possession of this chunk of bone, and based on the size, porosity, and locality (York River State Park) I believe it's a whale bone (Miocene-Pleistocene in age, likely a mysticete). My question is, which bone exactly is it? It seems to have some fairly distinctive features that seem to lend towards identification, but after around two days of research i'm stumped. I'm thinking it could be anything but some vertebral element, but i'm not sure. Any help is greatly appreciated.
  23. Hey all, The Calvert Cliffs have been falling left and right recently. Countless cliff slides have led to plenty of new material becoming accessible on the beaches, but the unstable cliffs also call for extra caution. I decided to return to my favorite winter hunting location, Bayfront Park, to try and take advantage of the cliff falls. I thought it would be a good opportunity to film my first YouTube video, which I have been wanting to do for a while, so I brought my new handheld camera mount. Peak low tide was exactly at sunrise, so I woke up at 4 a.m. in order to arrive at the beach before then. Early mornings can be rough, but if you're getting up to do something you love it's a whole lot easier. When I got to the parking lot, it was still very dark and I actually had to use my phone's flashlight to hunt for the first few minutes before the sun began its ascent into the horizon. It was a very cloudy day, so unfortunately I wasn't treated with one of the gorgeous Brownies sunrises. Within 10 or 15 minutes or searching, I found one of the biggest teeth I've ever found at Brownies, a huge 2 inch mako in perfect condition. That's when I knew it was going to be a good day. Not too long after that, I stumbled across a circular object slightly covered by sand. It looked like it could be some kind of vertebra or possible a "cookie" (dolphin epiphysis), but there was only one way to find out. When I tried pulling it out, it didn't budge. I pulled harder. As it still wouldn't come out, I realized it must be much larger than it appeared on the surface. Throwing aside the rock next to it, I finally pulled out a beautiful cetacean vertebra! I've always wanted to find one, especially after running into a guy who found a dozen of them on my last Brownies trip, so I was ecstatic. I continued finding some very nice teeth. I also found another cetacean vertebra, this time a very different shape but in very good condition. Despite the harsh temperature and dangerous cliffs, there were quite a few other hunters out on the beach. At one point I ran into a man who had found two perfects Megs, each one about 2 inches. I hoped to find one for myself, but had no such luck. Regardless, I was extremely content with everything I found and began to make my way back to the car. This trip was one to remember, not only because of the awesome finds, but also the fun experience of filming the video. I kept this trip report rather short, because the video covers the detail I usually go into, and then some. Anyway, I've wanted to become a fossil hunting YouTuber pretty much ever since I began hunting, but I just never really got around to it until now. I love watching YouTubers like @addicted2fossils, and I hope others will find my videos to be entertaining and educational as well. I've posted the link to my video below, and I would really appreciate it if you would take a second to like the video, leave a comment, and subscribe to my channel. I'll be putting out many videos like this in the future. I have some very exciting trips coming up, including hunting at a private creek site and going to the annual Aurora Fossil Festival in NC! Stay tuned. Hoppe hunting!
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