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Found 238 results

  1. I have here a 3" piece of bone, found in Calvert Cliffs, Maryland. I'm not well-versed enough with these to narrow it down further from marine mammal, and am hoping that these photographs contain some identifying features that may be useful to one more familiar with these. Can it be narrowed down any further?
  2. Dear Fossil Forum Members, My friend recently found this bone-looking piece on the beach near the St Marys formation at Calvert Cliffs. We have heard that many of the bones washing up are fragments of whale or dolphin bones. Since this piece is so big, we are thinking its some sort of whale bone. Could anyone please help verify this? Sorry there are no proper forms of measurement, for reference the piece is roughy 4.5in (11.5cm) wide and 6.5in (17cm) long. Here are some photos:
  3. A Whale with no name

    My hunting days, during South Florida's rainy season are few and far between. I wait for and really appreciate the opportunities that come my way. I was out with a friend in the sunshine today. We were finding lots of small teeth, plus sand tigers, upper/lower hemis, a few small Makos, and I even picked up a Meg. There also were a number of sting ray teeth, denticles and broken spines. Then , in the 2nd last sieve of the day, I found one of my favorites -- a whale tooth, but not just any whale. I have found a number of Kogiopsis .sp teeth and somewhat fewer Scaldicetus teeth, both of which are know to exist in Florida. This one is neither Kogiopsis or Scaldicetus... Very odd. Is that enamel on the outside with flaking horizontal bands tradition or cementum? A little bit of a "bulb" at the root end, and one of the oddest root terminations I have ever seen on something I think to be whale. Last year I was fortunate to be "gifted" a number of Aulophyseter morrice teeth from a friend who hunts Shark Tooth Hill. I added a photo of this newly found tooth, just to indicate that there are other whales with teeth this size, even though they do not match other characteristics. I had a fantastic day. I found a high quality whale tooth that very likely can not be identified. and finding one gives me hope that I will find more like it.I decided to publish photos just in case others have found similar teeth... Jack
  4. Whale Stuff

    2-3 weeks back, I was digging a hole trying to get down to the clay bottom, finding some nice sized G. cuvier and just on top of the clay, a 2 inch Mako. I also found a little bit of whale, a broken tooth, a small "cookie", and a very flat bone fragment and something that seemed like a rock, but was not.... or at least I thought not... It took me a little while. This really does feel like rock . and the clam bore hole did not help. I found something like it 3 years ago and just had to recall. k Sometimes, it is not just a rock. rIn this case , it is a petro_tympanic of a baleen whale. Here is an example from a Grey whale. So this is an ID thread. What about that flat bone?? Came out of the same hole, nothing similar, once again it feels like a rock, but.... something is saying "bone" to me... I have been wrong before. Opinions appreciated !!!!!
  5. Tooth, Tusk or Bone?

    Found in Green Mill Run creek on 8/21/2020. Unsure if it is whale tooth, some type tusk or Bone. My original assumption was Sperm Whale but some have thought maybe tusk??
  6. Whale vert?

    Hi all! Found this on a beach where late miocene fossils are often exposed or washed up. Im thinking it's a whale vertebrae, but would like the input of the forum members. Whale or something else?
  7. Hey all, I wrote up some more on our recent paper on the giant dolphin Ankylorhiza (formerly Genus Y) from the Oligocene of South Carolina - this is a bit more interesting as it covers the anatomy, adaptations, feeding ecology, and evolutionary implications of the discovery. Hope you can give it a read! https://coastalpaleo.blogspot.com/2020/08/ankylorhiza-tiedemani-giant-dolphin_9.html
  8. Fossil identification

    I found this fossil in Santa Cruz and don’t know what part of whale this is. Thank you all so much. The photos are the one I’m not so sure about.
  9. Bulla Fossil

    East Venice, FL. Pleistocene material. I believe the fossil is a bulla It measures 76 mm x 41 mm at longest points. It is on the red color side. I am attaching a bulla that is black in color for comparison which is a smaller example. Can anyone explain which animal they could have come from?
  10. Hey all, Since COVID began and I've had more free time I've been getting back to blogging, and now I'm regretting taking such a hiatus since I started here in Charleston. I've written the first of a 2 or 3 part series of semi-technical blog articles that most here should understand and appreciate on our new study on the giant dolphin Ankylorhiza tiedemani (formerly known as Genus Y). The first post is about the background to our paper, and the second one will be a bit more on the anatomy, feeding behavior, locomotion, and evolutionary implications of Ankylorhiza. Take a read here: https://coastalpaleo.blogspot.com/2020/08/ankylorhiza-tiedemani-giant-dolphin.html
  11. Whale Bone?

    This was found at the same site we recovered a possible manta ray tooth from along the coast of Southern California. It has two to three distinct layers, one very thin layer possibly 1mm thick (on the outter side, displaying some black tar-like markings), a layer about 3-4mm thick (just below that thinnest layer described above), and the last layer being 3/4 of an inch thick (this layer is very porous). Can only provide one photo as I’m limited to the size of the upload, I possibly can upload more images if possible. Looking if we can get an ID on the subject, thank you for all of your help.
  12. White Whale, probably not Moby

    I have a fossil hunting friend, who keeps very little of what he finds. Anything that has serious issues goes back to the fossil gods or into the bone garden at home. To make it into his collection, it must be exceptionally good. I am not like that... I keep almost everything... to analyze and toss later maybe, but initially keep it. He keeps very few fossils, which has its advantages. We sort of have a deal... anything he does not want (in certain categories) he saves for me.. I do what I can to repay the kindness. One of those categories is whale: He gave me this one last week It is a 4.25 inch Florida whale tooth, likely Kogiopsis. My question relates to the composition. The species seems to have no enamel, so originally this was dentine, surrounded by cementum. It is a land find from a construction site in Florida. I have similar teeth with this composition from the Bone Valley phosphate mines. To show a different Kogiopsis tooth, found in the Peace River, with a different composition: It is what I call "hard" composition... So the questions: 1) Is this composition unique to Florida? Do other TFF members who find whole/broken whale teeth (or any other fossil) have this type of composition in their fossil collections? 2) What is the composition and the process that creates it? Thanks, Just driven by curiosity. Jack
  13. Miocene whale jaw or rib?

    I posted in a trip report a few weeks ago that one of my boys found two big fragments--including the joint--of whale jaw in a cliff fall from Calvert cliffs. The assumption of jaw was based on what seemed like a good comparison to a jaw on fossilguy.com plus overall shape. But a commenter suggests that the joint is maybe not flat enough to be from a mandible and that this could really be a rib. So I'm looking for any second opinions. We would really like to get a proper ID, especially as my son wants to fill in the missing segment and make a single piece out of the two pieces for display. Because of the way they came out of the fall, although they were with each other, we aren't 100% sure of what the orientation of the two pieces ought to be with respect to one another. I have put the two pieces in a few different configurations just to show what each might look like. Having a proper ID would really help. Any whale experts, please have a look and let me know what you think.
  14. Help with some whale teeth IDs

    Hi. Does anyone know the identifications for these whale teeth? Thanks for your help. This tooth was found on the Ernst ranch in Bakersfield, California. It is from the Miocene-aged Temblor formation. This tooth was found by a diver near Savannah, Georgia. I unfortunately don't have any more information on it.
  15. Greetings everyone! I'm hoping someone might be able to help ID something that is not in the best of condition/shape. It's quite unusual from what I typically see/find here in Eastern NC - at first I was thinking the root of a whale tooth but it's not like any I've seen/found myself before. So, I'm hoping someone might be able to give direction if this is a tooth root or maybe even a small tusk root, possibly? There is only a tiny bit of enamel present on the tip where the tooth would be and the texture on the "inside" is somewhat similar looking to what I'd see in whale or maybe even a sliver of mastadon tooth but not quite - I tried to get as clear of images as I could but if different angles are needed, just let me know! Any help is greatly apprecaited! Found: Eastern NC - outside of Greenville - in a River- items commonly found in this same area (within the gravel deposit)/around it are large chunks of whale bone (Ear bone, rib, skull and verts), Great White, Giant White and meg shark teeth, and some shell concretions. I've found nothing indicating there is cretaceous within this small area to date and cannot recall finding any other mammal material within this location, either.
  16. Hey all - in discussing my recent research on the new extinct dolphin Ankylorhiza with science journalists, I was reminded of previous frustrations from earlier discussions with students, museum visitors, fossil collectors, journalists, and even other scientists about the meaning of the words whale, dolphin, and porpoise. Some disagreements were on this forum, others were on facebook fossil groups - the whole notion of "that's not a dolphin tooth that's a whale tooth" or vice versa is plagued by the fact that these terms have multiple established meanings and are imprecise, leading to lots of confusion, to the point where I pretty much have to start every discussion off with "there are two groups of cetaceans living today..." - many, for example, are confused about toothed baleen whales existing if only odontocetes have teeth. One thing I tried was to conduct a twitter poll showing four modern species and asking if people thought they were a whale, dolphin, or porpoise - and the majority was right only half the time: a leaping beaked whale was thought to be a dolphin, and a small dolphin was thought to be a porpoise. I've had so many discussions on here and have had to repeat some of these arguments ad nauseam, so I thought I might as well crystallize my thoughts into a blog post. I hope you enjoy it! http://coastalpaleo.blogspot.com/2020/07/whale-dolphin-or-porpoise-meaningful.html
  17. Miocene Big Bones Bonanza!

    Got out last week with my boys for a late afternoon trip to Calvert Cliffs to try a new spot. The beach was not very productive, yielding just a few smallish bull and tiger shark teeth. It seemed to have been worked over pretty hard before us. So we quickly turned our attention to a very sizable cliff fall at the tide line. Just looking over the surface, it didn't take long before boy #1 spotted what turned out to be a complete rib fully exposed. (Not 100% sure exactly what from but, I think, porpoise.) It was fragile and ended up coming out in three pieces, but we got the whole thing. On close inspection, it seems it also might have some predation marks. Then, while we were still working on that, just around the corner boy #2 yells out about something big. On the next chunk of cliff fall, also down low, he spotted a really nice piece of whale jaw also totally exposed! We got that out and also recovered the joint, although there is a missing piece in between. Still an awesome find! (The jaw is very solid, so we'll have to learn how to reconstruct the gap and make it one big piece.) We couldn't find any other part of it, unfortunately--we were all hoping for the skull. Just a little while later, on the next big chunk over, another collector pointed out a tiny surface of bone that he generously offered to my boys if they wanted to do the work to get it out. It turned out to be a really cool atlas vert from a porpoise (I think). It was extremely fragile, too, and in a couple of pieces that we'll have to glue together (any tips?), but another neat find. Then, just for good measure, boy #2 digs out a really nice tuna vert. (We added a 2nd, smaller one later.) This was all in maybe a 30-foot stretch. How no other collectors saw any of this stuff--and it was clear many had walked right by it all day--is a mystery. And to top it all off, on the way out with our bone haul, boy #1 spots a sweet croc tooth in the wash. It's funny that we set out to find some big shark teeth, and found almost none, but still ended up with maybe our best fossil trip ever! Enjoy the pics. And if anybody wants to confirm or correct ID's, please feel free.
  18. Florida Pliocene Whale Skull

    My good friend Rob in Florida, not a Forum member, suggested that I post pics of the odontocete whale skull he found at an undisclosed location in the Pliocene of FL. He has sent pics to Smithsonian and they believe it to be Kogiopsis floridanum, a form of sperm whale described from a jaw section. He's enjoying the prep work, most of which can be accomplished without his scribe, and it appears that there are predation marks on what is left of the snout. Great find.
  19. Whale Vertebra ?

    I believe it is possibly a whale vertebra. It is light for it's size. Found inland Venice, FL in a dirt pile. Image 7414 shows flat surface of fossil. The remaining images are lateral views.
  20. I need help identifying this Bone I found after a storm at OBX. The sandal in the picture is a mans size 10.
  21. Bite marked bone?

    I found this in Polk county, Florida a couple months ago and while looking through bones recently I found a couple things I hadn’t noticed and one of them was this small bone fragment that I think has a bite mark in it. It is almost exactly 3/4 inches.
  22. Hi all - I did not have time in January when I normally write these up, but thanks to Covid quarantine I managed to get some time last month and write up a comprehensive review on my blog of every single 2019 paper in marine mammal paleontology. Enjoy! https://coastalpaleo.blogspot.com/2020/05/2019-in-review-advances-in-marine.html
  23. Charleston, SC - Possible Whale Bones?

    Hi everyone, These are from Charleston, SC. I'm thinking whale bones. Anyone know for sure?
  24. Just wanting to figure what these barnacles are attached to. I'm guessing a whale bone, but kinda want to be for certain. It's pretty damaged and large. It's pretty cool though. Found in nokomis Florida on a construction site.
  25. Fossil whale rostrum in large concretion at oregon coast. Mid miocene in age.
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