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Found 98 results

  1. Album link: https://imgur.com/a/rEHsb
  2. Fossilized Whale bones?

    Hello everybody, Can't remember where I picked each piece from. I found most along the York and James rivers in Virginia, some may be from the Potomac River in Maryland. Pretty sure these are all Whale Bones??? Curious to know what the names are to each part/piece, if distinguishable from being fossilized pork chops. Also if anyone knows how to clean bones... or leave them as they are?
  3. Whale Verterbra?

    Hello! My older sister just sent me a large fossilized bone. She lives near Raleigh, (Garner, NC) but years ago took her son on various fossil hunting trips with the local club. I know they went hunting around Aurora, NC. The is a vertebra; I know there are whale fossils in the area. She no longer remembers - I do think it is a small whale vertebra! Any other opinions? I am very pleased with it, but would like some input on an identification from a more experienced eye than mine, which is NOT TOO experienced in these matters! Thanks for looking!
  4. Well I was looking at Marcos cool post about coprolites and was scrounging thru some of my Manatee Cnty boxed material and didnt find any coprolites so here's several potential whale/dolphin type frags that I'm not entirely sure about and was wondering if any of you all can confirm. I'm thinking A is a root of a maybe a dolphin tooth, B is a bulla of some sort , C is a fragment of some type of fish jaw--seems like I've seen this somewhere before? D and E appear to be anterior processes/ of dolphin periotics. I added a closeup of the end view of A and a closeup of C. I also found this little guy which is fairly well preserved and has some very distinct symmetry...seems to be a tilly of some sort. Thanks for any help. Regards, Chris
  5. Miocene Whale Recovered From & for Display at Westmoreland State Park in VA This past Saturday, Mrs.SA2, @Daleksec (Trevor), his dad Orlin, @MarcoSr, his 2 sons Marco Jr. and Mel, a couple of other folks and I had the pleasure and privilege to finally finish recovering a whale skull from the cliffs at Westmoreland State Park here in VA. Marco Sr's sons had been working to excavate and recover this skull since June, but due to the unstable cliffs, high water levels, wind / waves, and trespassers / poachers damaging the plaster jackets, they had not been able to finish the task until this past weekend. Given the size and weight of the jacketed skull, a boat was the easiest way to get it off the beach and transported to the boat ramp where the Park's employees used a large tractor to lift it off the boat and set it on a trailer. Once prepped, the skull will be put on display at the Park's Visitors Center along with a photo album and video display chronicling the endeavor in hopes of providing knowledge and context about the geology and fossils of the area. Since Mrs.SA2 is still recovering from her fall back in late September, she was tasked with the photography / videography of the recovery. Combined with photos taken by Marco Jr. and Mel from the beginning of the excavation and several others of the group taking photos / videos on Saturday, the Park visitors will be able to see the step by step excavation and preparation process from start to finish. It is hoped that the skull and other skeletal pieces along with the photo album and video will be ready for display to the public by this spring. Everyone working to recover the whale were volunteers except for the Park employees. For the record, back at the end of June these plaster jackets on the skull and post-cranial bones are the same ones Mrs.SA2 and Trevor caught trespassers / poachers beating on with a large stick in hopes of stealing fossils. By the time they were discovered (caught red handed in the act), the trespassers / poachers had already busted the jackets open and removed multiple vertebrae, flipper bones and ribs from their matrix in the now busted open jackets. Thankfully, Mrs.SA2 & Trevor were able to stop the crime, take possession of the removed bones and then turn them over to the Park for safe keeping. Unfortunately, the Park Rangers were unable to catch the criminals despite the great descriptions provided. Here are a few of the photos taken during the recovery on Saturday. The first task of the day was clearing off the debris and sediment that had recently fallen on the working ledge. Mel is on the left in the red hat. I'm on the right and Marco Sr. is in the middle. (Don't worry folks, there are better photos of Marco Sr. a little later.) You can see the delamination and cracking of the cliff on each side of the working ledge. Here is Trevor taking a break from shoveling. Here is Mrs.SA2 posing in front of the skull. Once the debris and sediment was cleared away, the damaged / wet plaster jackets had to be removed and then the sections re-jacketed for stability during recovery. Aluminum foil was used to provide initial cover for the bones. Mel is putting on the foil while rest of us discuss how much this thing is going to weigh. Marco Jr. is in the bright blue sweatshirt, Marco Sr. is in the blue stocking cap, Orlin is in the gray hoodie closest to the cliff and I've got on the baseball cap turned backwards. Burlap is applied after the foil so the plaster will have a substrate for binding. Here, Marco Jr. is wrapping the skull in burlap while Mel mixes up the fist bucket of plaster. Next comes the plaster jacket. The Potomac River provided free water which was mixed with bags of plaster in a bucket, then hand applied to cover the burlap. Water temperature was 49F on Saturday. Mel is on the left and Marco Jr. is on the right. Didn't take long for their hands to turn blue. An interesting side note for those who don't know, Marco Sr., Marco Jr. and Mel have a website called phatfossils.com. They also have a Facebook page with the same name AND they have M&M Ranch in Nebraska where you can find Oligocene terrestrial animal fossils. You can Google that one if you want. Mrs.SA2, Trevor and I always enjoy fossil hunting and fossil discussions with them because we learn so much! Recovering the skull, we just provided the boat and some manual labor, they did the hard part. A couple of photos showing better views of the cliff. Marco Sr. is on the left in the blue stocking cap. Our buddy Zsolt is in the black coat on the ledge. Zsolt helped with taking photos and videos and is saving himself for the important task of lifting the jacketed skull off the beach. More on that later. Here is the skull with its new plaster jacket and wooden support. We found a 2" X 8" board on the beach and cut it to length in order to provide a rigid support once the jacket is flipped over. It took about 90 mins for the plaster to harden / set. Once the jacket was solid, Marco Jr. and Mel dug out underneath of jacket to separate it from the surrounding matrix. Orlin (on right with gray hoodie and shovel) helped shave off the edge of the ledge so we could roll it over and move it off the ledge and down to the beach. Note the sediment ramp built below the jacket. Once the jacket was free from the surrounding matrix, it was rolled over onto the 2X8 board and slid down the sediment ramp to the beach. It was remarkably easy since Marco Jr and Mel had built such a good jacket and gravity worked with us. (Photo below shows a much better shot of Marco Sr., blue stocking cap, 2nd from left) Next, extra matrix was removed from what was the bottom in order to get rid of weight and lighten the load. Below, Orlin (on left) is calculating the weight. Just for reference, a cubic yard of wet sediment from this location weights roughly 2,200 -2,500 lbs. The 8 of us were going to be picking up at least 1/2 cubic yard of dirt, plus the plaster jacket, 2X8 board and skull. Trevor is on the right helping Mel trim off extra matrix. Mel's tongue only came out a few times. After the load was lightened as much as possible, we used those always handy, ratchet straps to keep the jacket closed and secure during transport. The straps also kept the jacket attached to the wooden boards we used for lifting. Wouldn't want it to slide off and us drop it. You can see one of the boards sticking out the left side near Orlin's knee. We used 3 boards perpendicular to the jacket, plus a person at each end, in order to lift it. (YES, it was heavy.) All the boards were found along the beach. More to come in next post.
  6. It kinda looks like an ear bone?

    Found this today, something struck me as odd so I stuck it in my pocket. It’s from the peace river. I’m looking at it, and it kinda looks like an ear bone from a dolphin or manatee, but I don’t know...it’s something, just can’t wrap my head around it. Any ideas?
  7. whale bone

    Heading back to Singapore with hundreds of tiny shark teeth for my fossil-less friends! I found some "whale bones" that someone had unearthed but left behind in the creek. A couple seemed unusual. One, while thick and heavily fossilized had a concave surface suggesting either hollow inside or maybe just a convex/concave bone piece? (Aquatic mammals don't have hollow bones, correct?) The second, also fairly thick and heavy but obvious fibrous "grain" on one side, has a straight v-shaped crease (about 1/8" deep) the length of the piece. Wondering if this is natural or possibly man made? There is also a much weathered piece which had some obvious fibrous grain when wet, not so obvious now. Looks like part of a joint?
  8. Massive vertebra - whale?

    An acquaintance found this in a Marble Falls (TX) thrift store - provenance otherwise unknown. With help from a capable lab assistant, the following pics were provided, with scale in inches. Might this be from a whale? Hoping we can narrow down the possibilities (and age) for the owner. Thanks in advance for your help!
  9. Whale Vertebrae ID Help

    Can someone identify what species of whale this is and how big the whale might have been it is from Aurora, North Carolina. I got it at fossil show the bottom is 6 inches wide 5 inches high the top is broken so I cant get a actuate measurement
  10. Whale bone?

    Found this while fishing a pond in SW Florida. Do you think this is a whale bone? Thanks for any comments. I thought it was a hub of an old wheel and threw it away. Thought about it all day and when I got home today, I dug it out of garbage can already on the curb.
  11. Megs and more

    We went to a new spot and It paid off! My girlfriend found some great megs. The pics should fill in the rest.
  12. Todays find

    So as Bosse quoted on the last one of these I found it seems that this would be the same thing. And I quote " atympanic bulla of a balaenopterid baleen whale." I just thought this one was unique to do the inner striations were. Found in a deep ditch, Miocene Im assuming (could be wrong), measurements shown on picture. Found in South Carolina, US
  13. Whale and dolphin ear bone?

    Hi everyone, I just recently got into fossil/shark tooth hunting a few months back. These are just a few of my finds. I think one is a whale ear bone, and another from a dolphin? I just wanted someone to correct me if I am wrong. Thanks in advance
  14. Hello gang! So we are being mildly inconvenienced at the moment while hurricane Irma comes/goes by so I'll try to post a few photos from my phone while we still have backup power and lights. Sorry for the lack of scale on some shots..editing capabilities are limited. First up..a worn Sarasota cnty Fl plio'pleistocene whale bulla that really has that human ear look to it that called me. Edit....guess I have got a file size limit prob so this may be embarassing...uggh
  15. tooth in coral?

    My family and I usually visit the Frio River in Leakey, Tx every summer. A few years ago we were all set to go swimming but upon arriving we saw that the part of the river we usually frequent had dried up. I decided to make the best of it and explored the dried river bed looking for anything interesting when this isolated chunk of rock caught my eye. I picked it up off the ground, took it home with me, put it in a drawer and forgot about it. A few months ago I found it while doing some cleaning and realized it had to be something more than just an oddly shaped rock. I cleaned it with water and a toothbrush after reading online that that's a simple way to clean fossils. A friend of mine with limited knowledge of fossils suspected it was some kind of fossilized coral or sponge. What I originally thought was matrix does look a lot like syringopora, but I can't find pictures of any prehistoric coral fossils that match the appearance of that hot dog in the center! I saw a sperm whale tooth on this forum that looks similar but I'm not sure if what I found feels like a tooth. It feels way too smooth to me. I love fossils and I own some shark teeth, coprolite, and a little trilobite, but those were all bought. If whatever this is turns out to be something, then it would be the first fossil I've ever acutally found myself. I'm still really new to this so please forgive me if I am asking silly questions or submitting this incorrectly. Any insight would be greatly appreciated!
  16. This, a possible whale rib...any clue on the "markings" or groves on the side of the bone
  17. Hi! I found this in a beach in the Savannah River. Its 3.5 inches long and 1.5 inches thick on the middle. It has a weird curveness that you can appreciate better on the Side 4 pictures. It made me think of where the other jaw tooth fits?! I looks like a sperm whale tooth but I'm not sure. Any input is greatly appreciated!!!
  18. Miocene Bone or Just a Rock..

    So, I found this last week in Southern MD. The question before my esteemed miocene experts is.. Did I find the ear drum of a whale..? or am I being fooled by a cleverly shaped rock? ( Also, this is before the specimen fully dried out. ) Thanks for any assistance!
  19. My mother and I were visiting a pawn shop that I frequently visit for it's impressive taxidermy collection, and next to a ratty old elk's head and a vintage fur coat I spotted something I recognized immediately as a fossil. And not just any fossil, but a fossil from something very large indeed. The second I spotted the price tag, $49, I knew this was too good of an opportunity to be passed up and purchased it. I have no idea whereabouts the vertebrae came from, but there appears to be some moss and organic matter packed into a few of the openings that make me think it might have been found in a forest. There's even an old spider egg sac attached to the underside. My first (relatively) educated guess was of course that it came from a whale, due to it's sheer size. And after some quick research I do find many similarities between it and the vertebrae of toothed whales. But I'm no expert, I'd appreciate some second opinions and help before I positively identify it! I also spotted what look like tooth-scrape marks around the spinal cord opening, but I can't personally say for sure.
  20. cetacean phylogeny

    Jmartin
  21. ID help please

    I have no idea. Found in North Charleston, SC in a recently dug pond. Any ideas?
  22. Not sure if this is man made or some type of vertebra fossil
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