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Found 11 results

  1. It was a glorious day to fossil hunt. Warm with a soft breeze and still slightly chilly water. See, I had gotten incredibly lucky. I had gotten a connection to Dr Stephen Godfrey and he invited me to hunt today at a classified location (sorry I am not allowed to spill the beans). Our friend Mr Eric came along as well as MomAnonymous. As soon as we had gotten there, interesting things began to appear. Dr Godfrey began to point out things i'd never had understood without being told. At the bottom of the cliff face, Dr Godfrey pointed to a strange indentation and then told us a story about he and other paleontologists finding completely intact fish skulls at the cliffs, which are nigh on impossible to find. Then he told us that the skulls were a type of tilefish, which as some may know burrow through mud. These tilefish buried themselves in these burrows and they became a kind of tomb, which is why they stayed intact and weren't destroyed. At this time, the Hobbit (movie) had just came out and when Dr Godfrey was given the ok to name the species, he went from something from the Hobbit. Dwarves tunneled, and their mountain was named the Lonely Mountain, and Erebor in the elvish language, and the species became Eraborensis.
  2. Would anyone happen to have contact info for anyone in the fossil field at the Smithsonian/Museum of Natural History? Actually, any museum, or "official"(?) expert of the field--Prehistoric whales/Cetus. Ive tried contacting anyone from the smithsonian website contact form, and through email, but haven't had any luck yet. I know they would be very busy, but as my attempts have only gone to the most general direction, I'm thinking that if the messages even end up getting to the correct people at all, they may not even get the messages for some time.
  3. https://gizmodo.com/toothless-33-million-year-old-whale-could-be-an-evolut-1830739126 https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-11/cp-3wf112118.php https://phys.org/news/2018-11-whales-lost-teeth-evolving-hair-like.html
  4. I've found a couple of listings of archaeocete teeth frags from Harleyville, South Carolina on a fossil seller. I know that Basilosaurus cetoides, Zygorhiza kochii, and Dorudon serratus all exist in this area, with a couple of examples of all three having been found there (now in Charleston Museum collection). However, is there a way to differentiate between them when it comes to teeth, specifically incisors? Some images of the listings are below. First tooth measures 2.6 inches. Second tooth measures 2.2 inches, but is a frag so I imagine that it may be much bigger if restored. Third tooth measures 3.75 inches.
  5. http://www.newsweek.com/fossils-prehistoric-mammals-unearthed-during-subway-construction-los-angeles-859032?piano_t=1
  6. As request by WhodamanHD, here is a post of my recent sperm whale tooth find from Brownies Beach over the weekend and some other cetacean teeth. I also included a very cool red squalodon tooth I found at Stratford hall along with another tooth which I believe is also Squalodon. I like how the Squalodon tooth is split in half, I wouldn't have found it if I didn't notice what looked like a root of a tooth underwater. I also included a cool dolphin vertebrae I found at Stratford Hall
  7. Hey all, Our collections manager and I have had a pretty busy week, and finished the first phase of the installation of the "Cone Whale" - a baleen whale skeleton collected from the Lee Creek Mine by Lee Cone (President of the Special Friends of the Aurora Museum). The specimen is the most complete whale skeleton ever collected from the mine, and was hauled out a few bones at a time over a two week period in Spring 2007. It includes a partial disarticulated cranium with an earbone (petrosal/periotic), left and right mandibles, all cervical vertebrae, most of the thoracics, and possibly a couple of lumbar vertebrae - and about a dozen ribs. The skeleton also has numerous shark bite marks, which just yesterday we marked with a series of red triangular markers. The new exhibit features artwork by yours truly, shark-bitten ribs in a magnifying box, and in the future will also include a number of specimens that the "Cone Whale" was preserved with. The "Cone Whale" shares a number of features in common with rorquals (family Balaenopteridae - the pleat-throated whales, e.g. humpback, fin, blue, minke) and gray whales (family Eschrichtiidae). The two families are closely related, with gray whales possibly being included within the rorquals based on DNA. Fossils like this hold promise to shed light on the early diversification of this group. The "Cone Whale" is a new species and was not represented amongst the fossils described in the Whitmore and Kaltenbach chapter of the Lee Creek IV volume - I've only seen a couple of other earbones of this taxon, so it is safe to say that this is the rarest baleen whale from the mine (and hence, a very lucky find). Lee Cone graciously donated this specimen to our museum in October 2016 and we've been painstakingly caring for it, and attempting to further reassemble fragments of the specimen. Turns out, Lee was nearly exhaustive in his efforts, and we've only been able to match perhaps 10% of the isolated fragments. The entire skeleton is highly fractured because it went through a dragline and was dumped - yet all the bones stayed in approximate position. Many parts were found by bulk screening of sediment. Come see the "Cone Whale" at College of Charleston soon - it opens to the public today for the first time ever! "Like" our page on Facebook or follow us on twitter for more frequent museum news and updates! -Bobby Boessenecker, Ph.D. College of Charleston Charleston, SC
  8. Whales Only "Recently" Evolved Into Giants

    Interesting..... https://www.seeker.com/earth/animals/whales-only-recently-evolved-into-giants
  9. Hi All, I recently came across what I believe to be quite a large collection of fossils while walking along a sandy coast in Manado, North Sulawesi (Indonesia), which was undergoing development. Judging by some of the fossils and the Cenozoic geology of the region, I was leaning towards them being whale and turtle remains but would very much appreciate any advice anyone may have on individual fossils or the collection as a whole. Once the most likely creatures are established, I plan to focus my research to try to identify and categorise as many of the fossils as I can. Thanks in advance for your input, and I'm happy to send through further shots/angles as required. This appears to be a partial whale caudal vertabrae with marks (teeth/wear?) on one side. Some on the top row resemble sperm whale teeth while the last few on the bottom row could be parts of ribs or other bones. Here are close-ups of some of the teeth-like forms. The fossils in the top row appear to be the femurs of sea turtles and the one on the bottom right the end of a sea turtle rib. The very small fossil is of similar shape to the larger ones, and I'm not yet sure about the whiter fossil at the bottom left. Some larger fossils (including the suspected vertabrae). The rounded one at the top may be from a femur. Could these be from a pelvis or sternum? Some of these (particularly the third from the left on the second row from the top and the ones on the row beneath it) resemble jaw fragments. The second from the left on the bottom row has almost a tripod appearance. Some of these could be from leg bones or ribs, while there appears to be a couple of hand bones to the lower left. Some very femur-like ends. The one third from the left on the bottom row resembles a bone from a dugong's sternum. Some rib fragments and other pieces. And finally some smaller fragments, some with triangular cross-sections, and perhaps some hand and finger bones.
  10. Whale vertebrae from the Calvert Cliffs

    From the album Tertiary

    Whale vertebrae Miocene Calvert Formation Anonymous beach/Chesapeake Bay Found by anonymous collector and generously donated to this writer
  11. Multi Teeth Id's

    Does anyone know what creature these teeth belonged to? I found the first one about a year ago and I found the second one two days ago, and I think they came from the same animal. I am pretty sure a whale but I have no idea what kind. These are the first teeth of this kind I have found, Im pretty sure mammal k-9. maybe seal? Last, could someone confirm that this is a hubble meg tooth.
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