Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'white river formation'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 30 results

  1. Hello, this is a small jaw segment from the White River Formation (Poleslide Member of the Brule) from Weld County, CO. This is one of a few jaw segments I cannot white identify. It does not look like the Leptomeryx jaw segments that I have collected (and indeed is even too small to fit that genus), and the shape of the teeth to me do not look like they belong to an Artiodactyl of any kind, so my best guess based on picture browsing is Ischyromys but I could be very very wrong here so I appreciate any help. Thanks!
  2. White River Formation Carnivore Canine

    Hello! This is a canine tooth (that has been split in half) that I collected from the White River Formation (I believe Poleslide Member of the Brule) from Weld County, CO. I think it is a carnivore’s canine rather than simply an Oreodont canine just due to its size, but I could be wrong there I suppose. My best guess is Daphoeneus or similar due to its shape, it does not look like Hyaenodon to me, but again, could be totally off there. Pictured is the tooth’s lateral surface, interior (because it was split when I found it) and the “cutting surface.” Thanks!
  3. Hello! This is a small fossil from the White River Formation of Weld County, Colorado. To me it appears to be a set of front incisors rooted to a small piece of the maxilla or mandible. There are no teeth or tooth sockets next to the two that are there, and so this makes them look like the two incisors characteristic of rodents and lagomorphs. Interested if anyone can tell me anything else about them. Two photos are through a stereo dissecting microscope at 20X magnification, the other two, though blurry, should give a sense of scale. The entire fossil is about 9 mm tall, with the tooth crowns themselves being about 4 mm tall. Thanks!
  4. White River potentially hollow (avian?) bone

    Hello, everyone, Lately this summer I’ve been doing a bit of casual fossil collecting (with explicit permission!) on some land that a very close family friend owns in Weld County, Colorado that has a lot of exposure of the White River Formation, and I’ve collected a sizable amount of material including some pretty awesome finds. Being an amateur, I need some help identifying some of the fossils I’ve collected. Since the forum has a photo upload limit per post, I’ll be making a few threads for different finds, I hope that is ok. This small bone appears to be hollow, which indicates to me it might be avian but that may or may not be the case. It does have a ridge/process on the lateral surface which may aid identification. Location (as stated above) is Weld County, CO, on the Brule Formation. Thanks!
  5. White River Teeth ID

    Hello, everyone, Lately this summer I’ve been doing a bit of casual fossil collecting (with explicit permission!) on some land that a very close family friend owns in Weld County, Colorado that has a lot of exposure of the White River Formation, and I’ve collected a sizable amount of material including some pretty awesome finds. Being an amateur, I need some help identifying some of the fossils I’ve collected. Since the forum has a photo upload limit per post, I’ll be making a few threads for different finds, I hope that is ok. The following are two teeth that I found very near to (but not attached to) a piece of jaw bone. My current hypothesis is that these two teeth are associated with the same jaw. From Weld County, CO. Though hard to tell from the pictures, tooth #1 does have a distinctive ridge at the apex of the crown, though this could just be wear. Tooth #2 appears only to be a fragment, and a small fragment at that, and so may or may not be identifiable unless it turns out they’re from the same animal and the first tooth is identified. #1: #2: Thanks!
  6. White River Small Partial Vertebra ID

    Hello, everyone, Lately this summer I’ve been doing a bit of casual fossil collecting (with explicit permission!) on some land that a very close family friend owns in Weld County, Colorado that has a lot of exposure of the White River Formation, and I’ve collected a sizable amount of material including some pretty awesome finds. Being an amateur, I need some help identifying some of the fossils I’ve collected. Since the forum has a photo upload limit per post, I’ll be making a few threads for different finds, I hope that is ok. This is a small partial vertebra, collected in Weld County, CO on the Brule Formation. The piece next to it is one of the transverse processes, which was barely attached when I collected it but finally unfortunately broke off when in my bag. Any identification appreciated. Thanks!
  7. White River Formation Small (toe?) Bones

    Hello, everyone, Lately this summer I’ve been doing a bit of casual fossil collecting (with explicit permission!) on some land that a very close family friend owns in Weld County, Colorado that has a lot of exposure of the White River Formation, and I’ve collected a sizable amount of material including some pretty awesome finds. Being an amateur, I need some help identifying some of the fossils I’ve collected. Since the forum has a photo upload limit per post, I’ll be making a few threads for different finds, I hope that is ok. These are two small bones that look very similar, from Weld County Colorado. To me they look a lot like the toe bones of ruminants like deer, but I’m wondering if anyone has any better or specific guesses. #1: #2: Thanks!
  8. I've spent the last three days in Wyoming hunting fossils with Paleoprospectors. Monday was spent on the Lance fm, Tuesday on the White River fm and Wednesday was back on the Lance. The first half of Monday was spent prospecting for new sites along a wide open space. The best find happened early on when a younger guy found an Anzu claw, I was not so lucky for a while as I found only a few bone bits in a mostly scarce area. I continued walking along a ridge overlooking the open grassland until I noticed an outcropping of a light brown/orange colored rock. I decide to test my luck and hit it with my rock hammer and to my pleasure, there were abundant snail, bivalve and plant fossils inside this conglomerate. This little channel deposit raised my spirits, but I was still hungry for dinosaur and other vertebrate fossils. My little hunting buddy, a horned lizard. Some shots of the conglomerate containing the snails and other fossils: My best find from this conglomerate channel deposit was this nice bivalve Although I absolutely enjoy and appreciate finding invertebrate fossils, dinosaurs and other reptiles have my heart. The second half of Monday consisted of the group spending time hunting at a microsite. This spot was where I was most successful. Top Left: Worn alligator tooth Top Right: Paronychodon tooh (the first in my collection) Bottom: A piece of crocodilian osteoderm A section of Champsosaurus jaw A nice coprolite, maybe fish or small reptile A partial small theropod or bird toe bone A hadrosaur spit tooth A croc tooth still lying in the sand
  9. Unknown Maxilla from Oligocene

    Hey everyone, I was digging in the White River Formation when I found this amazing maxilla of some creature. Through some questioning and conversations with various paleontologists, many people have different opinions of what this is. The responses I’ve had are all different, being Oreodont, Dire Wolf, or a species from the family of Brontotheriidae. The w shaped teeth might suggest Brontotheriidae... What are your guy’s opinions? The maxilla is about 6 inches long.
  10. Fossil Id Confirmation - White River Skull

    This has been in the family for probably 60+ years. I have handled it and seen it countless times, prior to this it has sat in the bottom of a garage cabinet drawer for the longest time, and now I'm bringing it to you! This skull was caked in matrix on one side and mostly exposed on the other before I started working on it (first picture is the exposed side). I think I have the ID correct, I believe it's a Hyracodon skull, I'm looking for confirmation and I'm also curious as to which "sub member" these are found in... Brule, Chadron, or another layer of the White River Formation (I'm new to this and the majority of my research has been more geared toward the Cretaceous period of my state, thanks in part to the Jurassic Park movies ... ) . Forgive me as I haven't done a ton of research on the White River area, or ever stepped foot there... I know it's tough to believe as I live right here in South Dakota, but I continue to tell myself every time I drive by on I90 "next time", so maybe soon I'll put my boots on that ground. (I know that it's illegal to collect bone fossils in the National Park, but its an absolutely beautiful area that I have yet to check out). Anyway, here are the most recent preparation photos. (I have a decent amount of progress photos if anyone is interested). I'm not quite done with prep yet and I'm happy to take more detailed photos of anything someone might find interesting.
  11. Long Bone ID

    Looking for some help with the ID. Mineralized, large and heavy, about 10 lbs. from the white River formation in SD. Distal end of a femur perhaps? Thanks for any help with the ID.
  12. White River Jaw

    Looking for help. Found near Lusk Wyoming in the White River Formation. Someones mandible but not sure. Horse ? Rhino? other Thanks for any help.
  13. White River Formation Atlas

    Hello People Looking for help with identifying the owner of this Atlas bone found in the White River Formation in Wyoming.
  14. "Bingo", Oreodont!

    I took a trip to Nebraska to collect the White River Formations for the very first time this past summer. I had two goals: recover a Stylemys and an Oreodont skull. I found both! I reported on the prep of the Stylemys in an earlier post on the prep sub-forum. When I saw the Oreodont, I yelled "Bingo, Oreodont!". So that's the name I gave the animal. This post will summarize the discovery, preparation, and reconstruction of the specimen. The skull was not complete, and only about 25-30% of the animal was present, so with apologies to the "Palaeo Police" , I decided that this specimen would have a greater contribution as a display piece than sitting in a drawer with other oreodont remains (which are common and numerous). Also, if any of these bones were later found to be of scientific importance, the procedures used in this reconstruction are reversible THE DISCOVERY Bingo was spotted on the side of a relatively steep butte. The first thing I saw was the partial skull. Here it is: After exclaiming (proclaiming) "Bingo!", I left the skull and immediately went to the base of the butte and started probing and digging in the two washouts that originated in the vicinity of the skull. These re-worked deposits were yielding lots of bone elements from the posterior to the anterior of the skeleton. I even managed to recover the brain cast and pieces of the skull that had washed down. Once the re-worked deposits had been thoroughly searched, I climbed up to the skull and began excavating. The top of the snout was crushed (predation?). The brain case area was also fragmented as well as the rear of the jaw. Some of this was pieced together later from elements found in the spoil at the base of the butte. I removed the skull via a "soft jacket". Here is what was recovered:
  15. From Butte to Beaut

    Thought I'd share a few photos of a tortoise prep I just completed. This is from the white river group of Chadron, NE (circa 33 mya). Here is a series of photos from discovery to excavation to restoration and preparation. The discovery: broken shell (As usual, I forgot to take a true "before photo". I've already probed a bit here). After some digging, it was discovered that this individual is upside-down. Here, the plastron is being revealed.
  16. Merycoidodon?

    I got this a while back, it's an oreodont haw section. I am seeking more information on it. My guess was Merycoidodon just based on pictures. Here's a bunch of pictures, I'm hoping to get as specific on taxon as possible, it says on the label it's from Chadron deposits, white river formation, 20 miles northeast of lush, Wyoming.
  17. Oreodont jaw section

    From the album WhodamanHD's Fossil collection.

    Bought online, label reads "OREODONT JAW SECTION oligicene period 30 million years old Lusk,Wyoming....20 miles northeast of lusk....White river formation...Chardonnay deposites"
  18. Unknown Jaw Fragment

    This was a recent find on private land near Lusk Wyoming. It is an area with lots of oreodonts and lots of turtles. Always anxious to find anything different. I think that is likely a long shot because there is not much to go on ..... but there is plenty of brain power on this site. What struck me the most was how thick and heavy this bone feels. THe teeth are all broken off and both ends are gone. The ventral aspect is also broken off so its full depth in that direction is not appreciated either. Thanks in advance if any one has any ideas.
  19. Tortoise Prep

    I've just received a massive tortoise prep job, which will be my summer project. It measures nearly 14 inches long, and somewhere around 12 inches wide. At its peak it's six inches tall. This will be quite the project (though after I clean and replace the broken side, it'll be a breeze compared to some other preps) I'm still in the planning proccess of this prep but I'll start by assembling the smalles peices togethor, and work up to larger chunks. I'm glad to actually be on the forum again.
  20. I picked up these white river formation teeth in bucket labelled rhino. I doubt that label. One is partial tooth and the other is a jaw section.
  21. Hi all, I have a Ogliocene-aged partial fossil jaw from the White Rivers Badlands. The seller identified this as a Hyracodon nebraskensis. It measures 2.8 inches across. However, two other friends with White Rivers fossils protested this ID. One said it's Subhyracodon instead. The other believes it could be Oreodont. Can anyone tell if this is a rhino? Thank you.
  22. Vertebra ID Assistance

    Would love to have a definitive ID on this small vertebra from the White River Formation Jackson County South Dakota.
  23. Small jaw secton with teeth

    From White River formation South Dakota. Has some appearance of Oreodont but it seems small.
  24. Stylemys turtle restoration

    Any ideas on how to remove the green lichen staining from this partially weathered turtle without doing damage?
  25. Hesperocyon jaw

    From the album Badlands, Nebraska megafauna.

    Hesperocyon (Early Dog) jaw from the Miocene of Nebraska (Arner Ranch). White River Formation.
×