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Found 8 results

  1. Second guessing a concretion

    Had a pretty good day out at my Thedford area spot today with some nice finds. I usually can pick out - and pitch aside - the infrequent concretions in the Widder Formation, but this one gave me pause. Perhaps I was out in the heat far too long, but this looks like it could be more than just a concretion, but unsure of what (giant ammonoid?). There's some faint ribbing, and a thin pyritized crust. I kept the impression pieces in case. Details: Mid-Devonian, Widder Fm (Thedford/Arkona, Ontario). Object at widest is 11 cm (or about 5"). Any assistance would be very welcome. If it is just a concretion, I'll practice some shot-put.
  2. The missus and I spent a good part of the day at our spot in the middle Devonian. I chopped out several large slabs while Deb split some of the smaller chunks and managed some overburden duty. The split in the wall may seem promising, but there are a lot of interlocking pieces that have to be removed in sequence, something like taking apart a jigsaw puzzle, but needing to locate the key stones first.
  3. A group of us spent several days at a spot near Thedford, Ontario working an exposure in the Widder Formation. Rather than roll out a long backstory, I thought I would go straight for showing the finds. I'll kick it off with the trilobites. 1. A coveted multi-plate containing three Greenops widderensis. The picture is blurry because it was starting to rain that day and we had to move fast. As one of them had its lappets hovering precariously outside the matrix, I had to coat them in cyanoacrylate fast so that it would survive the trip home. This one is in the hands of a preparator friend as it may be a bit more advanced than my current skills could handle.
  4. Greenops widderensis

    From the album Trilobites

    Widder Formation Arkona, Ontario, Canada

    © 2018 by Jay A. Wollin

  5. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Brachiopod - Mucrospirifer thedfordensis (Front and back views) Widder Formation, Ontario, Canada Middle Devonian 383-393 Million Years ago Mucrospirifer is a genus of extinct brachiopods in the class Rhynchonellata (Articulata) and the order Spiriferida. They are sometimes known as "butterfly shells". Like other brachiopods, they were filter feeders. These fossils occur mainly in Middle Devonian strata. The biconvex shell was typically 2.5 cm long, but sometimes grew to 4 cm. The shell of Mucrospirifer has a fold, sulcus and costae. It is greatly elongated along the hinge line, which extends outward to form sharp points. This gives them a fin- or wing-like appearance. The apex area (umbo) of the pedicle valve contains a small fold for the pedicle. Mucrospirifer lived in muddy marine sediments, and were attached to the sea floor via the pedicle. The shell sometimes looks like two seashells stuck together. Brachiopods, sometimes called lamp shells, are filter feeders and are attached to the sea floor by a fibrous pedicle that extends from a hole in the pedicle valve. The “wings” of the spirifers possibly stabilized the shell in the sea floor sediments. In order to feed, brachiopod shells had to be open. The lophophore, a combination of a feeding and respiratory organ, had a number of tiny tentacles that created a current to allow filter feeding. It was supported by two arms attached to the interior of the brachial valve. This was an evolutionary disadvantage when compared to bivalve molluscs, which could feed through siphons with the shells tightly closed. The first brachiopods appeared in the early Cambrian. Some brachiopods have survived competition from molluscs, today generally living in very deep or cold water. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Spiriferida Family: †Mucrospiriferidae Genus: †Mucrospirifer Species: †thedfordensis
  6. From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Fossil Brachiopod - Mucrospirifer thedfordensis (Front and back views) Widder Formation, Ontario, Canada Middle Devonian 383-393 Million Years ago Mucrospirifer is a genus of extinct brachiopods in the class Rhynchonellata (Articulata) and the order Spiriferida. They are sometimes known as "butterfly shells". Like other brachiopods, they were filter feeders. These fossils occur mainly in Middle Devonian strata. The biconvex shell was typically 2.5 cm long, but sometimes grew to 4 cm. The shell of Mucrospirifer has a fold, sulcus and costae. It is greatly elongated along the hinge line, which extends outward to form sharp points. This gives them a fin- or wing-like appearance. The apex area (umbo) of the pedicle valve contains a small fold for the pedicle. Mucrospirifer lived in muddy marine sediments, and were attached to the sea floor via the pedicle. The shell sometimes looks like two seashells stuck together. Brachiopods, sometimes called lamp shells, are filter feeders and are attached to the sea floor by a fibrous pedicle that extends from a hole in the pedicle valve. The “wings” of the spirifers possibly stabilized the shell in the sea floor sediments. In order to feed, brachiopod shells had to be open. The lophophore, a combination of a feeding and respiratory organ, had a number of tiny tentacles that created a current to allow filter feeding. It was supported by two arms attached to the interior of the brachial valve. This was an evolutionary disadvantage when compared to bivalve molluscs, which could feed through siphons with the shells tightly closed. The first brachiopods appeared in the early Cambrian. Some brachiopods have survived competition from molluscs, today generally living in very deep or cold water. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Brachiopoda Class: Rhynchonellata Order: †Spiriferida Family: †Mucrospiriferidae Genus: †Mucrospirifer Species: †thedfordensis
  7. Good day, this is a fossil collected from the Widder Formation at Hungry Hollow. I was wondering if someone might know what this is? It is 3.8 cm x 4 cm and appears to have dimples across its surface, what I believe to have been spines. THANK YOU, Corey Lablans
  8. Arkona Ids

    Let me begin this topic by saying that I am notoriously bad for posting pictures. Perhaps it's one of those little jobs that always feels like it will take a lot more time and effort than it actually does, so it gets avoided constantly. Perhaps it's because I don't actually have photographs (decent quality ones) of most of my collection. But regardless, I'm terrible for posting pictures. So, this evening, with a bit of free time on my hands, I decided to take advantage of the knowledgeable folks here who have experience with the Arkona fauna and try and pin down some IDs on a few specimens. Going through my photo collections I came across a few photos of things that might be useful for identification purposes. So here's the first one (2011.4.18), currently identified as Platyaxum frondosum.
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