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Found 6 results

  1. Shark Tooth ID (meg?)

    Hi guys and gals, Looking through some of my teeth from the past couple of trips and was looking to get an ID on this tooth. Is it a little meg? Thanks!
  2. Hi everyone, I just got back from my morning trip to the beach and am thrilled to have found another nice tooth. Last night I went out and the tide was much too high, I ended up leaving after a few hours with only a few small teeth. As I searched the beach for the first hour this morning, I started to worry that my luck might finally be running out. Thanks to Memorial Day weekend the beach was absolutely packed, which was an unpleasant change of pace from usually having the beach mostly to myself. As I started to lose interest and consider heading back to the car, I decided to check up higher in the dryer shell deposits as opposed to where the waves were reaching. As I walked a few feet up the beach, I almost immediately stumbled across this tooth, lying completely exposed with footsteps surrounding it a few feet in each direction. The tooth was almost fully dried out at this point and must have been sitting there for close to an hour as the tide had receded 10-20 feet down the beach. Tourists looking for shells littered the beach in every direction, I was in shock that nobody had seen this tooth all morning! I have attached a photo of the tooth as it laid in the sand upon finding it. Unfortunately the tip is a little damaged, however the root is probably in better condition than every large tooth I've found here. Additionally, the coloration of the tooth is very different compared to the jet black teeth I am used to finding. Although I didn't end up finding much else in the next hour or so (a few small teeth), I'm really happy I decided to head out this morning. It's funny how when the hunting has been really good, just one bad day can really kill your confidence. At the same time though, just one good tooth brings it all back! I'll be back out there soon... Cheers!
  3. Megalodon Tooth?

    Hi everyone, I just returned from a morning beach hunting trip and found what I'm thinking is a small meg. I'm not entirely sure though, because nearly every other larger tooth I've found here has been identified as angustidens. It was found on Wrightsville Beach/ Wilmington, North Carolina. I'm thinking meg because of the lack of cusps. Anyone?
  4. Pathologic Sharks Tooth

    Hi everyone, I found this tooth yesterday at the beach in Wilmington, NC. I initially thought it was broken, but then saw that it was actually very warped with all of the serration remaining. After some googling I've found that they are known as pathologic teeth. If anyone has any information about pathologic teeth I would be super interested to learn more! Also would be interested to hear opinions on ID. Angy?
  5. So, I've recently been collecting sharks teeth at my local beach in North Carolina. Compared to teeth at most beaches I've hunted growing up, these are quite beat up. Out of the roughly 200 teeth from the past few weeks, I'd estimate that probably 75-90% of them are broken. Nearly every Great White tooth has been vertically fractured, usually cutting corners off of my precious babies. Is this just due to searching in the surf where the teeth are constantly being thrown around? I have been searching for teeth on similar beaches my whole life and have never seen such a high ratio of broken:whole teeth. Would be curious to hear everyone's input on why this might be.
  6. Stumbled on this site and remembered I had an account that I haven't used for a while. Five years later, I thought I'd post an update. Shark Tooth Island is located in Wilmington, NC, just off the shore from River Road Park. If you're standing at the boat ramp facing the river, the island directly in front of you is Keg Island. At low tide, the upriver side of the island can have some specimens to collect, but I never had as good of luck on Keg Island as I did on Shark Tooth Island. The smaller island directly upriver from Keg Island is Shark Tooth Island. When I first joined this site it was suggested that sifting would be the best bet for finding teeth on the island, as it's pretty picked over. The first few times I went out I sifted, but I learned quickly that I would actually have much better luck both in size and number of teeth per hour if I just did surface collecting. Two main issues limit surface collecting. The first is rather obvious: the tide. At high tide there is pretty much no bank to collect on. From my experience, the Campbell Island Tide Chart is the most accurate to rely on for Shark Tooth Island. I found that getting on the island about 1.5 hours before low tide peaked was most effective. Plenty of surface to collect on, and it will be growing for an hour and a half. Also, if you're walking right on the edge of the water, don't forget to look in the water. I found several that were still underwater. The second main issue that limits surface collecting is the kayak tour groups. PaddleNC I think? They would take a dozen or so people to the island and if they got there before you, you're not going to have much luck that day. Unfortunately I don't remember what days/times they would normally do the tours there else I'd let you all know. One thing to keep on your mind when you're out there, if a cargo ship or other large vessel passes by, you're going to want to make sure your kayaks are pulled WAY up before the water returns. If you left your boats only a few feet out of the water and a big vessel goes by, there's a good chance that your kayaks will be floating down the river when you're ready to leave. Anyways, here are the vast majority of my finds from the four years I lived in Wilmington. The only fossil pictured that wasn't found on Shark Tooth Island or Keg Island is the largest tooth. That I found while trying to avoid stepping on anything sharp while walking barefoot on Masonboro Island.
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