Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'wing'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
    Tags should be keywords or key phrases. e.g. carcharodon, pliocene, cypresshead formation, florida.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Fossil Discussion
    • General Fossil Discussion
    • Fossil Hunting Trips
    • Fossil ID
    • Is It Real? How to Recognize Fossil Fabrications
    • Partners in Paleontology - Member Contributions to Science
    • Questions & Answers
    • Fossil of the Month
    • Member Collections
    • A Trip to the Museum
    • Paleo Re-creations
    • Collecting Gear
    • Fossil Preparation
    • Member Fossil Trades Bulletin Board
    • Member-to-Member Fossil Sales
    • Fossil News
  • Gallery
  • Fossil Sites
    • Africa
    • Asia
    • Australia - New Zealand
    • Canada
    • Europe
    • Middle East
    • South America
    • United States
  • Fossil Media
    • Members Websites
    • Fossils On The Web
    • Fossil Photography
    • Fossil Literature
    • Documents

Blogs

  • Anson's Blog
  • Mudding Around
  • Nicholas' Blog
  • dinosaur50's Blog
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • Seldom's Blog
  • tracer's tidbits
  • Sacredsin's Blog
  • fossilfacetheprospector's Blog
  • jax world
  • echinoman's Blog
  • Ammonoidea
  • Traviscounty's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • brsr0131's Blog
  • Adventures with a Paddle
  • Caveat emptor
  • -------
  • Fig Rocks' Blog
  • placoderms
  • mosasaurs
  • ozzyrules244's Blog
  • Sir Knightia's Blog
  • Terry Dactyll's Blog
  • shakinchevy2008's Blog
  • MaHa's Blog
  • Stratio's Blog
  • ROOKMANDON's Blog
  • Phoenixflood's Blog
  • Brett Breakin' Rocks' Blog
  • Seattleguy's Blog
  • jkfoam's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Erwan's Blog
  • Lindsey's Blog
  • marksfossils' Blog
  • ibanda89's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Liberty's Blog
  • Back of Beyond
  • St. Johns River Shark Teeth/Florida
  • Ameenah's Blog
  • gordon's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • West4me's Blog
  • Pennsylvania Perspectives
  • michigantim's Blog
  • michigantim's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • lauraharp's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • micropterus101's Blog
  • GPeach129's Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • Olenellus' Blog
  • nicciann's Blog
  • maybe a nest fossil?
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • Deep-Thinker's Blog
  • bear-dog's Blog
  • javidal's Blog
  • Digging America
  • John Sun's Blog
  • John Sun's Blog
  • Ravsiden's Blog
  • Jurassic park
  • The Hunt for Fossils
  • The Fury's Grand Blog
  • julie's ??
  • Hunt'n 'odonts!
  • falcondob's Blog
  • Monkeyfuss' Blog
  • cyndy's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • pattyf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • chrisf's Blog
  • nola's Blog
  • mercyrcfans88's Blog
  • Emily's PRI Adventure
  • trilobite guy's Blog
  • xenacanthus' Blog
  • barnes' Blog
  • myfossiltrips.blogspot.com
  • HeritageFossils' Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Fossilefinder's Blog
  • Emily's MotE Adventure
  • farfarawy's Blog
  • Microfossil Mania!
  • A Novice Geologist
  • Southern Comfort
  • Eli's Blog
  • andreas' Blog
  • Recent Collecting Trips
  • retired blog
  • Stocksdale's Blog
  • andreas' Blog test
  • fossilman7's Blog
  • Books I have enjoyed
  • Piranha Blog
  • xonenine's blog
  • xonenine's Blog
  • Fossil collecting and SAFETY
  • Detrius
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • pangeaman's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Jocky's Blog
  • Kehbe's Kwips
  • RomanK's Blog
  • Prehistoric Planet Trilogy
  • mikeymig's Blog
  • Western NY Explorer's Blog
  • Regg Cato's Blog
  • VisionXray23's Blog
  • Carcharodontosaurus' Blog
  • What is the largest dragonfly fossil? What are the top contenders?
  • Hihimanu Hale
  • Test Blog
  • jsnrice's blog
  • Lise MacFadden's Poetry Blog
  • BluffCountryFossils Adventure Blog
  • meadow's Blog
  • Makeing The Unlikley Happen
  • KansasFossilHunter's Blog
  • DarrenElliot's Blog
  • jesus' Blog
  • A Mesozoic Mosaic
  • Dinosaur comic
  • Zookeeperfossils
  • Cameronballislife31's Blog
  • My Blog
  • TomKoss' Blog
  • A guide to calcanea and astragali
  • Group Blog Test
  • Paleo Rantings of a Blockhead
  • Dead Dino is Art
  • The Amber Blog
  • TyrannosaurusRex's Facts
  • PaleoWilliam's Blog
  • The Paleo-Tourist
  • The Community Post
  • Lyndon D Agate Johnson's Blog
  • BRobinson7's Blog
  • Eastern NC Trip Reports
  • Toofuntahh's Blog
  • Pterodactyl's Blog
  • A Beginner's Foray into Fossiling
  • Micropaleontology blog
  • Pondering on Dinosaurs
  • Fossil Preparation Blog
  • On Dinosaurs and Media
  • cheney416's fossil story
  • jpc
  • Red-Headed Red-Neck Rock-Hound w/ My Trusty HellHound Cerberus
  • Red Headed
  • Paleo-Profiles
  • Walt's Blog
  • Between A Rock And A Hard Place
  • Rudist digging at "Point 25", St. Bartholomä, Styria, Austria (Campanian, Gosau-group)
  • Prognathodon saturator 101

Calendars

  • Calendar

Categories

  • Annelids
  • Arthropods
    • Crustaceans
    • Insects
    • Trilobites
    • Other Arthropods
  • Brachiopods
  • Cnidarians (Corals, Jellyfish, Conulariids )
    • Corals
    • Jellyfish, Conulariids, etc.
  • Echinoderms
    • Crinoids & Blastoids
    • Echinoids
    • Other Echinoderms
    • Starfish and Brittlestars
  • Forams
  • Graptolites
  • Molluscs
    • Bivalves
    • Cephalopods (Ammonites, Belemnites, Nautiloids)
    • Gastropods
    • Other Molluscs
  • Sponges
  • Bryozoans
  • Other Invertebrates
  • Ichnofossils
  • Plants
  • Chordata
    • Amphibians & Reptiles
    • Birds
    • Dinosaurs
    • Fishes
    • Mammals
    • Sharks & Rays
    • Other Chordates
  • *Pseudofossils ( Inorganic objects , markings, or impressions that resemble fossils.)

Found 25 results

  1. Hello guys and gals! I would like your views on something my best friend and I found some time ago. We were out on a little road trip and stumbled upon a pile of dredged up shells and what not. Always looking for something interesting, we went ahead and took a few scoops worth home. What we found piqued our interest. Something that looked like a wing. It felt like plastic so my friend held a lighter to it. Didn’t do anything, no smoke no smell. We got to searching the net and a number of things came up that looked vaguely familiar. Nothing we could definitively match it to though. Now it’s been a while, it’s been sitting on a bookshelf in my house, and today I picked it up again. Again looking at it, searching the net, and thinking could it be…. I don’t know. Based on what I found on the net and with some imagination I thought it could be part of a small flying dinosaur like Microraptor or Archaeopteryx or something similar. Hopes are high, I must say. Could be something entirely different. I’m not even sure this is an actual fossil or just some dried out wing from a species that still exists. My gut says it’s old, but I’m skeptical at the same time. Most fossils from the Jurassic and before are stone imprints (I'm sure that’s not the correct terminology) whereas this is an actual piece of a creature, perhaps petrified? Anyway, please have a gander at the photos and tell me what you think. https://photos.app.goo.gl/ALryjDDDM2rW84948
  2. Early Cretaceous dragonfly wing?

    Here is a piece from the one of the Early Cretaceous formation in West Beijing. I could not find any clues for ID. I spliced the closeups .
  3. Pteranodon wing display

    From the album Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Pteranodon Sp. Logan County, Kansas Niobrara form. Smokey Hill chalk Santonian-Campanian, late Cretaceous Im not exactly sure which bones they are, and I’d appreciate any input about it, but based on the significant difference between the 2 connecting bones, I’d imagine it’s one of the metacarpals and the connecting 1st phalanx. (I’m very proud of the display/storage box I made for it. Removed box innards and carved tightly fitted slots in padding from an old crystal wine glass box. Who says having random stuff sitting around for decades is a bad thing!?)
  4. Pteranodon wing (reverse side close up)

    From the album Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Pteranodon Sp. Logan County, Kansas Niobrara form. Smokey Hill chalk Santonian-Campanian, late Cretaceous Sadly this one broke while removing it from packaging, even with great care. Thankfully a beautifully clean break with no fragments or even visible dust! Im not exactly sure which bones they are, and I’d appreciate any input about it, but based on the significant difference between the 2 connecting bones, I’d imagine it’s one of the metacarpals and the connecting 1st phalanx. (I’m very proud of the display/storage box I made for it. Removed box innards and carved tightly fitted slots in padding from an old crystal wine glass box. Who says having random stuff sitting around for decades is a bad thing!?)
  5. Pteranodon wing (closer up)

    From the album Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Pteranodon Sp. Logan County, Kansas Niobrara form. Smokey Hill chalk Santonian-Campanian, late Cretaceous Im not exactly sure which bones they are, and I’d appreciate any input about it, but based on the significant difference between the 2 connecting bones, I’d imagine it’s one of the metacarpals and the connecting 1st phalanx. (I’m very proud of the display/storage box I made for it. Removed box innards and carved tightly fitted slots in padding from an old crystal wine glass box. Who says having random stuff sitting around for decades is a bad thing!?)
  6. Pteranodon wing (reverse sides)

    From the album Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Pteranodon Sp. Logan County, Kansas Niobrara form. Smokey Hill chalk Santonian-Campanian, late Cretaceous Im not exactly sure which bones they are, and I’d appreciate any input about it, but based on the significant difference between the 2 connecting bones, I’d imagine it’s one of the metacarpals and the connecting 1st phalanx. (I’m very proud of the display/storage box I made for it. Removed box innards and carved tightly fitted slots in padding from an old crystal wine glass box. Who says having random stuff sitting around for decades is a bad thing!?)
  7. Pteranodon wing (phalanx close-up)

    From the album Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Pteranodon Sp. Logan County, Kansas Niobrara form. Smokey Hill chalk Santonian-Campanian, late Cretaceous Im not exactly sure which bones they are, and I’d appreciate any input about it, but based on the significant difference between the 2 connecting bones, I’d imagine it’s one of the metacarpals and the connecting 1st phalanx. (I’m very proud of the display/storage box I made for it. Removed box innards and carved tightly fitted slots in padding from an old crystal wine glass box. Who says having random stuff sitting around for decades is a bad thing!?)
  8. pteranodon wing

    From the album Dinosaurs & flying reptiles

    Pteranodon Sp. Logan County, Kansas Niobrara form. Smokey Hill chalk Santonian-Campanian, late Cretaceous Sadly the phalanx(?) broke a bit during unpacking, despite the extreme care. Very happily however, it was all perfectly clean, without a single fragment, or even visible speck of dust! Im not exactly sure which bones they are, and I’d appreciate any input about it, but based on the significant difference between the 2 connecting bones, I’d imagine it’s one of the metacarpals and the connecting 1st phalanx. (I’m very proud of the display/storage box I made for it. Removed box innards and carved tightly fitted slots in padding from an old crystal wine glass box. Who says having random stuff sitting around for decades is a bad thing!?)
  9. Insect Plant Fish or ...?

    Greetings, everyone. I spent the other day on the east side of Ventura County breaking open sedimentary rocks. I'm not experienced enough with that sort of material to positively ID it but I think it was siltstone. There was a leaf and something else on both sides of one of the rocks. I've been having a hard time figuring out what the "something else" is. It measures about 35 by 14 millimeters. I took a few pictures of both sides under different lighting conditions to help bring out some of the finer details. It comes from the Modelo Formation (Miocene). Thanks ahead of time for any help in figuring out what it is. Here are pictures of the first side: Some pictures of the second side:
  10. In Synapses vs Saurapsids, Synapsids get more diverse forelimbs. https://m.phys.org/news/2019-03-mammals-unique-arms-evolving-dinosaurs.html
  11. What do you guys think of this. I’ve never seen one available before.
  12. Dragonfly wing?

    Hi, this fossil was found in the Fur Formation of Denmark, which 55 million years ago was at the bottom of an ocean. Someone claimed that this fossil was part of a dragonfly wing, but what do you think?
  13. Wing in Burmite Amber

    Recently, I went to burmite market in Myitkyina City, Kachin State, Myanmar. I bought a few Burmese amber (burmite) include this little one. It is about 1 and half inches big (roughly square shaped) inside there is a wing. I am not sure about what wing it is and I am guessing a butterfly. What do you guys think what wing it is.
  14. Wing fossil ?

    Hi I'm Char. I've just joined the forum and have always been interested in paleontology since young, but have a new found interest in it since having children. Ive got a finding I'd like to show/discuss with you. Hope you can help. We recently found this while in the Isle of Wight, at Brighstone Bay. Looks like it's an insect wing (1.5cm) embedded in mud? Would be interested to hear your ideas. Thanks.
  15. Insect wing?

    I found this in a gorge near a Wass go Lake New York. The wing-like shape is composed of quartz - we find lots of horn coral in this area so wasn't sure if this could also be an oblique section through some type of coral.
  16. Insect wing?

    Hi. I found this in South Yorkshire, UK in the Pennine Middle Coal Measures formation (upper Carboniferous.) Is it part of an insect wing or just a plant? I think it may be the negative half of the fossil though I'm not sure. Thanks, Daniel
  17. Hello again to everyone on the forum and can't wait to learn from you. I just joined this week and this will be my first main post. I have always been very interested in fossils and geology and finally went on an official fossil Hunting trip this past week. I went with my family the first time and we scouted out the area. I did a lot of research beforehand and read that Pit 11 was one of the most popular concretion hunting spots at Mazon, but that also means they are harder to find. After more research, I decided we should check out an area to the south called the Mazonia South Unit. I read that this area had been less collected because there is much thicker vegetation. The vegetation was very thick. We hiked for a couple miles into the Forested area and we came to the bottom of a large hill. Me and my brother scaled the cliff and saw a way down the other side. The bottom of the other side of the cliff ended right into a river. After we made it to the bottom, my father found the first fossil, a small leaf, in an open concretion. We then saw concretions everywhere around us and started collecting. We only stayed for about an hour that day because the mosquitoes were relentless. I got home and saw I had some fossils and got so excited, I went back out there by myself the very next day. I scaled the cliffs up and down and got as many concretions as I could. Not satisfied, I just came back from another trip out to Mazon yesterday. I'm still refining my technique, but I spent most of the time going up and down the cliff sides looking and picking for concretions. I had a geologic pick, and a bag as my main tools. The first couple times, I picked everything I saw. After more research, I was more picky yesterday and did a lot of cracking in the field. I am not done processing all my concretions but I will post what I have found so far. Please let me know if you can help identify any of them and if the pictures are good for your viewing. Any general tips for fossil hunting and anything is also welcome I have more than I can post in this one post, but will follow up post with rest of my current photos.
  18. ID - long claws, or wing?

    I have large stone with this image embedded (Fossil imprint?) among many I acquired to form paths in my gardens. As you can see, it looks like a "claw" - maybe with pad at bottom right of my foot - or it was suggested a "wing" portion? . . . I don't think it is an anomaly. As I do not know where exactly from where the stones came - here in the San Antonio, TX area most stones/rock came from quarries in the surrounding county. Any suggestions are welcome.
  19. Insect Wing?

    Am I trying too hard to make this a photo of an insect wing? From Cahaba River area Central Alabama. Have never found any animal/insect life before. OR is it possibly a bivalve? The entire shiny part of the fossil.
  20. Hey everyone! I found this in some limestone I cracked open. It isn't very large, but I'm wondering if someone could help me out. I'm not asking about the shells popping out of the stone, but the small brownish thing next to the penny. Does this look like anything? A wing of something or a fish fin? I have no clue. I got the limestone from the woods today here in central Iowa. Any help is much appreciated! Thanks!
  21. Unknown Secimen--Wing or Fin?

    From the album Laha

    Uknown wing/fin Texas, Yorktown Devonian/Carboniferous?

    © ©

  22. Unknown Secimen--Wing or Fin?

    From the album Laha

    Uknown wing/fin Texas, Yorktown Devonian/Carboniferous?

    © ©

  23. Unknown Secimen--Wing or Fin?

    From the album Laha

    Uknown wing/fin Texas, Yorktown Devoninan/Carboniferous?

    © ©

  24. Fossil Id--Wing Or Fin?

    This specimen was found in a gravel driveway in Texas outside of Yorktown. It is of unknown location. However, gravel isn't imported into Texas, Therefore, it came from somewhere in texas. The rock was already split open and specimen was laying on the ground. Me and my cousin (he's the one that found it) cannot tell if it is a Wing or a Fin? If it was my guess it would be from the Devonian into the Carboniferous Periods.
  25. Wing or Fin?

    From the album Laha

    This specimen was found by my cousin. Location: Texas, Near Yorktown in a gravel driveway. Gravel isn't imported in texas. So the location is somewhere in Texas. Unknown Time frame.

    © ©

×