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Found 72 results

  1. Unknown Ordovician Fossil

    This fossil is from the Platteville formation in southern Wisconsin, which is Ordovician in age. It does not seem to be a compress spiral, but rather composed of separate pieces or plates that alternate on either side. At the tip there are two sections that are positioned in the middle rather than on either side like the rest of the sections seem to be. I put it under the microscope but there is not much finer detail besides the individual grains, so it does not seem to be a Bryozoan or Coral. If anyone has any leads they would be much appreciated. The scale is in centimeters.
  2. Unusual Mollusk Shell?

    I found this on the Wisconsin shore of Lake Michigan near Racine. It appears to be a hollowed section of a mollusk shell. I have never ran across such a large cavity (about 1-1/4" across and almost 3" long). Also there is a unusual formation inside. Anyone help? Should I grind it down to expose cross section?
  3. Found in SW Wisconsin around a small creek bed while metal detecting. If you need any additional pictures let me know. Definitely want to go back and find more.
  4. Rockhounding Wisconsin

    In late spring the book Rockhounding Wisconsin was released. I had pre ordered it as I was excited they were making one of these books for my home state. I have several of the other ones for other states and love them. I waited several months and when I finally received it, read it cover to cover over 2 days. From a fossil hunter viewpoint I was seriously disappointed. From a fossil standpoint, almost every single site listed can be found on here. There are maybe a couple locales at most I wasn't familiar with, and only 1 of which might allow collecting. The author also is not very knowledgeable as to the laws of collecting as almost every site he said he wasn't sure about collecting status. From a responsible collectors point of view, this is one of the most pertinent parts of information. This information should have been sought out more so than the random filler commentary in the book. From someone seeking out gems and other shiny or fun rocks like agates, it's ok as Wisconsin isn't really known much for that. The sections on those are also quite vague saying things like, you should be able to find this even though I didn't because of the time of year. From a geology standpoint, I thought there was a lot of information on the various formations throughout Wisconsin. If you just want to find a bunch of rocks from different formations, time periods, etc, then this is a great book. There are tons of sites where you can find things like various limestones, banded rocks, etc. Overall I would give it 3 stars mainly because of the geology aspect. I understand it's a rockhounding book, and not a fossils and shiny object book, the latter of which my kids and I enjoy collecting. To me the book just feels forced, like the author just drove the major freeway through the state and picked locales that were close to the road. He even says many times about his family being with him so this undoubtedly influenced him going off the beaten path to find some real good places. His commentary also will rub some Wisconsinites the wrong way talking about poisoning our country with lead producing past and cheese producing now(obesity). Personally unless you're a geology student or someone who just really likes different looking random rocks, I wouldn't recommend purchasing this book. Stick to the advice of the fossil forum and save yourself 20 bucks.
  5. Rockhounding Wisconsin Review

    In late spring the book Rockhounding Wisconsin was released. I had pre ordered it as I was excited they were making one of these books for my home state. I have several of the other ones for other states and love them. I waited several months and when I finally received it, read it cover to cover over 2 days. From a fossil hunter viewpoint I was seriously disappointed. From a fossil standpoint, almost every single site listed is listed here on this site somewhere. There are many a couple locales at most I wasn't familiar with, and only 1 of which might allow collecting. The author also is not very knowledgeable as to the laws of collecting as almost every site he said he wasn't sure about collecting status. From a responsible collectors point of view, this is one of the most pertinent parts of information. This information should have been sought out more so than the random filler commentary in the book. From someone seeking out gems and other shiny or fun rocks like agates, it's ok as Wisconsin isn't really known much for that. The sections on those are also quite vague saying things like, you should be able to find this even though I didn't because of the time of year. From a geology standpoint, I thought there was a lot of information on the various formations throughout Wisconsin. If you just want to find a bunch of rocks from different formations, time periods, etc, then this is a great book. There are tons of sites where you can find things like various limestones, banded rocks, etc. Overall I would give it 3 stars only because the geology aspect. I understand it's a rockhounding book, and not a fossils and shiny object book, the latter of which my kids and I enjoy collecting. To me the book just feels forced, like the author just drove the major freeway through the state and picked locales that were close to the road. He even says many times about his family being with him so this undoubtedly influenced him going off the beaten path to find some real good places. His commentary also will rub some Wisconsinites the wrong way talking about poisoning our country with lead producing past and cheese producing now(obesity). Personally unless you're a geology student or someone who just really different looking random rocks, I wouldn't recommend purchasing this book. Stick to the advice of the forum and save yourself 20 bucks.
  6. Hi everyone. Haven't posted in a long long time. Been trying to get back out there to some sites in the upper Midwest. Took a day trip recently to several sites within the Platteville formation of western Wisconsin. Did a lot of research and looked at some previous posts by other members here - but I was going in pretty much blind to the various roadcuts in terms of where I should be looking. Took a while but started to have some luck. A second trip would probably turn out far more productive as I have a better understanding of the what is in the different rock strata now. I found a number of brachiopods and minor pieces, a few trilobite heads of rough quality. I did turn up a few pieces that I wasn't fully sure on - was hoping to turn it over to the community to comment. #1. Possible Gonioceras? Fossil is in pretty rough shape and a piece was broken off when I found it. What are your thoughts? Underside of the broken piece showing texture. #2 - No idea all all. Possible a "nothing". If I look at it long enough I imagine some kind of segments, but I think that's my imagination... hoping others have seen something like this.
  7. Trip to bluff county in minn

    My brother and I decided to do fossil hunting trip in Southeast Minnesota so we pay a visit to Beverly to get a copy of map for 5 dollars. We first hit Masonic park then few more sites before we call it a day. Our goal is to find a trilobite but it is not end of the world if we can't find one. Here's the pics of fossils. Any ID will be helpful. Pic #1 and 2
  8. Southeastern WI Brachiopod ID

    Here are two brachiopods that I hammered out of some rocks collected along Lake Michigan in Southeastern WI. One of them popped out of the rock in perfect shape, the other was partially exposed and didn't fare as well. These were from two different rocks. They look similar, but I think that they are different species. The pictures aren't great. I had my kid take them since my phone camera is broken. Let me know what you think.
  9. This summer my wife and I will be traveling to Wisconsin, near Green Bay for our 50th wedding celebration. I often hunt the Makoqueta formation north of Green Bay, and also a couple of quarry pits near Shawano and Gresham. After my trip to that area, we will be staying at my sisters for a few days (july 14-18) which is near Madison. I told her I would gladly visit her there, if she would allow me a day for some fossil hunting. But I don't know that area at all. I do know fossils have been found west of there. I am asking that someone point me in the right direction, or suggest a couple of spots. I don't mind traveling for a couple of hours to get at the location, so that would allow me to almost hit the Mississippi...So, does anyone know of anything available for a one day hunt from Madison. Thanks.
  10. Location: SE Portage County, Central Wisconsin, USA. Geology: South Western advance of Green Bay Glacial Lobe. Former Glacial Lake Oshkosh. Niagara Escarpment Debris. My land. Ordovician onward. Trying to learn, but am confused. I tentatively identified the below specimen as a Honeycomb coral, based on info from the below and input from local “experts”. None are Paleontologists, but one is a Natural History Museum Director. Begin quote: Favositid tabulates: Honeycomb corals The favositid corals are quite common. They usually formed large colonies. The corallite is prismatic in shape, resembling honeycombs. Favositids have mural pores, tiny holes in the wall of the skeleton, which connect different corallites. These pores are distributed in characteristic patterns and numbers, which are useful for distinguishing the various types of favositids. Favositids lived from the Ordovician to the Permian, at which time they became extinct. They are most abundant in middle Silurian to lower Devonian rock. Favosites is the most common fossil coral in Wisconsin. https://wgnhs.uwex.edu/wisconsin-geology/fossils-of-wisconsin/coral-gallery/corals/ Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, UW Extension The confusing part is that some surfaces of this specimen show no pattern or regular form. Just like most of my finds. Are there any clues to indicate a rock of this structure may be a coral? Other than cutting it open? I have about 50 like this, but only two others show the typical pattern. The rest just have the “circles” on all sides. All are basically the same composition of material, but colors vary. All have inclusions of crystals. My vision is limited, so I only know what I have found after I wash it and look under a lighted magnifier with a loop. Photographing helps a lot as well. I just go on shape and colors when picking up. Then use a small hand held magnifying glass to examine. Sometimes wash off with a little water first. My son in law, who has (almost) a geology minor from local University, is amazed at what the glaciers “dumped” on my land. Note that a large part of the classes were related to local fossils, due to the abundance of them. Please let me know if my ID is correct, and any pointers for identifying specimens which do not show the structure, only the “circles” or “cavities”. Thank you. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  11. Shark in Wisconsin, USA?

    Location: SE Portage County, Central Wisconsin, USA. Geology: South Western advance of Green Bay Glacial Lobe. Former Glacial Lake Oshkosh. Niagara Escarpment Debris. My land. Ordovician onward. I am still shaking. Went on first walk of the year in my fields. Found these, along with a few other fossils. Have never found any teeth, other than modern ones here before. My questions are: What are they? Look like shark to me. What era, species? Is this a significant find for my location? These look way too clean compared to my other fossil finds here. Is someone messing with me? Note that I only saw the upper ½” tip of the larger one sticking out of the ground. The smaller one had the base sticking out a little. Ground is still frozen here after about 1-2” on the surface. I used the screwdriver I had brought along to dig the larger one out. Thank you. ff teeth 1 ff teeth 2 ff teeth 3 ff teeth 3
  12. Location: SE Portage County, Central Wisconsin, USA. Geology: South Western advance of Green Bay Glacial Lobe. Former Glacial Lake Oshkosh. Niagara Escarpment Debris. My land. Ordovician onward. Is this a Straparollous? Holopea pyrene? Left some slightly blurry photos in to show cm size. The part in question is about .4 cm deep by 1.5 cm wide. There is also what might be a bivalve to the right of it, and maybe, chain coral. Dunno about what is shown on reverse. Looking for potential ID on all and anything else someone might see. Wondering if I should give this a toilet bowl cleaner (diluted) bath? The “snail” appears to be a quartz replacement. I did initial cleaning in Biz detergent for about 24 hours, repeatedly and several days in Oxyclean. Brushed after each soak with polyester bristle brush. Did not want to destroy the crystals above specimens, so avoided wire brush. Please let me know what you think. I also want to be sure I am using correct tags here. Since my land contains Ordovician onward period, should I just list Ordovician as the period? Also, how many tags are appropriate? Should they just be location found and potential period, or should they contain generic terms such as snail? If anyone else here is using an IPhone SE for photos and knows some ways to set it, I would be appreciative. I have been unable to figure out how to change the settings for photographing specimens. The camera has a mind of it’s own, and focuses on whatever it wants, even though I am doing everything that my provider told me to do to change the settings for macro. She said phone is capable of it, but required my digging into the depths, which I did. When I transfer photos from phone to computer they come up at 72 DPI. I am using Photoshop elements to change resolution and size, which usually causes photos to be blurry. Upon transfer, I have photos that are about 40 Meg. Once I adjust the size, they are down to less than 2 Meg. Then adjust focus and color cast to be as realistic as possible. I have figured out the best time of day for taking photos with my portable photo tent, LED light and natural light through patio doors. Also made a stable phone holder to help prevent blurry photos. Thinking there has to be an easier way, as each photo I post takes about 5-10 minutes total. Sorry, obsessive compulsive newbie here, lol. Thanks for looking and any comments appreciated. If my ID is off, no problem. top 3 3-16-4 3-16-3 3-16-2 3-16-2 3-16-1 3-16-8 3-16-9 3-16-10 3-16-12 3-26-6 shell side1 Fernwood Acres, on Flickr side 2 snail 1c Thank you.
  13. Straparollous?  Holopea pyrene?

    Location: SE Portage County, Central Wisconsin, USA. Geology: South Western advance of Green Bay Glacial Lobe. Former Glacial Lake Oshkosh. Niagara Escarpment Debris. My land. Ordovician onward. Is this a Straparollous? Holopea pyrene? Left some slightly blurry photos in to show cm size. The part in question is about .4 cm deep by 1.5 cm wide. There is also what might be a bivalve to the right of it, and maybe, chain coral. Dunno about what is shown on reverse. Looking for potential ID on all and anything else someone might see. Wondering if I should give this a toilet bowl cleaner (diluted) bath? The “snail” appears to be a quartz replacement. I did initial cleaning in Biz detergent for about 24 hours, repeatedly and several days in Oxyclean. Brushed after each soak with polyester bristle brush. Did not want to destroy the crystals above specimens, so avoided wire brush. Please let me know what you think. I also want to be sure I am using correct tags here. Since my land contains Ordovician onward period, should I just list Ordovician as the period? Also, how many tags are appropriate? Should they just be location found and potential period, or should they contain generic terms such as snail? Do not want to guess on period yet. If anyone else here is using an IPhone SE for photos and knows some ways to set it, I would be appreciative. I have been unable to figure out how to change the settings for photographing specimens. The camera has a mind of it’s own, and focuses on whatever it wants, even though I am doing everything that my provider told me to do to change the settings for macro. She said phone is capable of it, but required my digging into the depths, which I did. When I transfer photos from phone to computer they come up at 72 DPI. I am using Photoshop elements to change resolution and size, which usually causes photos to be blurry. Upon transfer, I have photos that are about 40 Meg. Once I adjust the size, they are down to less than 2 Meg. Then adjust focus and color cast to be as realistic as possible. I have figured out the best time of day for taking photos with my portable photo tent, LED light and natural light through patio doors. Also made a stable phone holder to help prevent blurry photos. Thinking there has to be an easier way, as each photo I post takes about 5-10 minutes total. Sorry, obsessive compulsive newbie here, lol. Thanks for looking and any comments appreciated. If my ID is off, no problem. top 3 3-16-4 3-16-3 3-16-2 3-16-2 3-16-1 3-16-8 3-16-9 3-16-10 3-16-12 3-26-6 shell side1 Fernwood Acres, on Flickr side 2 snail 1c Thank you.
  14. Fungi, Algae, Chert?

    Fungi, Algae, Chert? Location: SE Portage County, Central Wisconsin, USA. Geology: South Western advance of Green Bay Glacial Lobe. Former Glacial Lake Oshkosh. Niagara Escarpment Debris. My land. Ordovician onward. Size: 5 cm by 7.25 cm by 4 cm. Needing lots of help on this one. Different than most of my finds. Have been told it could be fungi, algae or just a rock. Texture is waxy in parts with crystals in others. Looks like a mushroom, but looks can always deceive. Comments appreciated on what it might be and era. Thank you. https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4783/40769961972_1401c223fe_z.jpg[/img]f1[/url] rul 1 rul 2 rul 2 rul 2 rul 4 rul 4 rul 4 rul 4 schroom 1 schroom 1 schroom 1 by Fernwood Acres, on Flickr schroom 5 schroom 6 rul 3
  15. Cool Coral

    Location: SE Portage County, Central Wisconsin, USA. Geology: South Western advance of Green Bay Glacial Lobe. Former Glacial Lake Oshkosh. Niagara Escarpment Debris. My land. Ordovician onward. Reminds me of Ordovician Halysites Coral-Chain Coral, but with a lot of wear. In some places, the chain is partially visible. When a light is held to the cavity edges shown on the first two photos, the walls are very translucent. Medium amber color. I saw the more solid edge and picked it up. Was very pleased when I turned it over, even though it was full of dirt. Like most of the fossils, I find, this one has received a lot of trauma. Possibly a victim of glacier which went through the Niagara Escarpment about 25,000 years ago. Most of my finds have partial or full crystal replacement for the coral stems. Size: 11 cm long by 10 cm wide by 9 cm thick at maximum points. All comments appreciated. Thank you. lace coral 1a lace coral 1c lace coral 2 lace coral 2 ud 2d
  16. Favosite, Tabulate, Something Else?

    Favosite, Tabulate, Something Else? Location: SE Portage County, Central Wisconsin, USA. Geology: South Western advance of Green Bay Glacial Lobe. Former Glacial Lake Oshkosh. Niagara Escarpment Debris. My land. Ordovician onward. Size: 7.25 cm by 7.5 cm by 7 cm (edges of “triangle”) by 3 cm thick. Wondering if this is worth some refining, or if the features would be lost? It has a pretty thick coating in places of deposits. All comments welcome on ID and potential for refining. Thank you. coral 4 coral 4a coral 4b coral 4e coral 4c coral 4h coral 4i
  17. Coral and Others

    Second posting attempt. Sorry of there was a delay and this is a double topic Central Wisconsin, USA. Glacial Drift/Green Bay Glacial Lob W. Advance/Glacial Lake Oshkosh Area. Ordovician onward. Unlike anything else I have found. Trying to identify all the various corals/critters that were preserved in this. So, have possibly identified barnacles, the abdomen end of a horseshoe crab, various shells/snails, and several corals. Please let me know if my ID’s are way off. Could this have been a coral colony that was overtaken by 1 or more other colonies? Then, as the corals died, barnacles moved in, along with other marine life? So fascinating. Putting this one in the hands of the experts here. Camera will always focus on the size reference in my photos (cell phone camera), so cannot do that. Size is 10.5 cm long, by 7.5 cm wide by 6 cm thick. Hope this helps. Posted this on another forum and was told it was nothing more than a chunk of chert. Some photos have details of what I think is there. Thank you so much. 1 2 3 4 5 6 6 9 11 10 12 13 gray coral 18 gray coral 17 gray coral 16 gray coral 15 close 1 words gray coral 15 gray coral 14 close 1 words gray coral 14 A snail shell? snail Posterior end of Horseshoe Crab? HS Crab[/url A barnacle? barnacle Thanks for looking. ud 2d
  18. Excited Newbie Coral ID Requested

    Rudist Coral? Location: SE Portage County, Central Wisconsin, USA. Geology: South Western advance of Green Bay Glacial Lobe. Former Glacial Lake Oshkosh. Niagara Escarpment Debris. My land. Ordovician onward. Been lurking here for a couple of years, learning everything I can. Finally decided to join. Always loved fossils, but never had access to many. That changed a couple of years ago, when I unknowingly purchased some very unique land. The age of fossils I find on my property range from Ordovician era to more “modern” times. Have found Chain Coral, Favosites and Horn Coral previously. Plus a few other marine, plant, bone and tooth specimens. There are many moraines in the area, some smaller ones are on the land I have. I posted the below specimen on another forum but was told it was “just a hunk if quartz”. Hoping all the experts here can shed some light on this. The overall feel is waxy, not like quartz around here. There are some inclusions of quartz crystals. If it is “just a hunk of quartz”, then it is an interesting quartz rock. Apologize for not being able to put a size reference in the photo, as my phone kept focusing on the size reference. The specimen is 2”, 50 mm across by 1 ¾”, 45 mm on the top. The sides are 1 5/8” 40 mm by 1 2/3” 70 mm. The formation on the top which reminds me of Rudist Coral is 3/8” 9mm, across. The colors in most photos are true. I did change them a little in some photos of the top to enhance the formations. Sorry, they are a little blurry. Taken with my phone, a portable photo tent and combo of LED and natural, North facing light. During the glitch over the past few days, I composed several posts for ID. Please let me know how many I an post right away, or if it is better to wait a few days between posts. Top: Top a top b Top c Top d Side 1: side 1a side 1b Side 2: side 2 Side 3: side 3a side 3b Side 4: side 4 side 4a[/url Bottom: bottom a bottom b bottom c Please let me know if additional photos are needed. I tried to take some of each surface, but it was tough. I can crop the other photos I have to show more detail in specific areas. Thank you.
  19. Partial eye stalk?

    Found this in Grant county, WI. Partial eye stalk? Asaphus? Any ideas, Thanks
  20. This specimen recently came into my possession with the information given below. I have googled the information and come up with nothing about the trilobite. I believe the location information is correct as I did find some information on the Brandon Bridge Fm. and it does describe the matrix correctly. I also remember reading about this trilobite or something similar on this forum a while back but cannot find the topic. I would appreciate help with the ID of this trilobite. I am pretty sure it is quite rare and would love to add it to my collection. Dalmanitae sp. Brandon Bridge Fm., Joilet Group L. Silurian Waukaisa Co., Wisconsin This is all that came with the specimen. Joe
  21. Found on stone fence

    Good evening. Can anyone tell me what this is? Possibly a Gastropod? We’ve got a stone fence on the property and love to look for fossils!
  22. Partial Trilobites to ID Please

    Just putting away my trilobite finds for the winter and decided to try to place a name with a face to a few, well a dozen , of my unknowns. Most of these were found in SW Wisconsin in the Mifflin of the Platteville Formation, Ordovician. It seems very difficult to ID trilobites when they present themselves as partials. These are not beautiful specimens, but knowing their ID can help me with future hunts. Thanks for any help. 1. Are these Thaleops or Illaenus cephalons? I can not figure out how to differentiate. 2. Is this a pygidium? If so, it is quite large. Any thoughts on how to label this? 3. What is the ID for the two partial cephalons with what looks like an eye on each one? 4. Is this a hypostome from Basiliella barrandi? 5. Can't place these pygidiums . Kinda isotoleus but kind of bumastus. Actually I have no idea!!! These actually came from the Maquoketa, not Platteville.
  23. As much as I've looked through books and the internet, I haven't run across any possible places to find ammonites in the midwest. Any suggestions of locations? I'm in Illinois. My wife's keen to hunt one of these down.
  24. Hello, bug lovers! I found some pretty cool trilobites this last Sunday at my favorite road cut in Wisconsin. Since I'm a bit of a noob with bugs I'd appreicate some help on IDs and a confirmation on the formation. I think this is the Platteville formation. But it could be Decorah.....? @piranha Sorry for the pics in advance. Lol Found as is. After a bit of prep. Gabriceraurus mifflinensis? Ceraurinella scofieldi (possibly more thorax)? Continued..........
  25. Hi everybody! I just a question. Does anybody actually purchase dinosaur bones ? I took this bone to UWL and they confirmed and I have emails and photos verifying that it is a Mastadon femur bone. They think they it wasn't full grown yet when it died. It's pretty cool actually and they can't believe how good of condition it is in.
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