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Found 241 results

  1. Hell Creek Metatarsal Joint Fragment

    Hey everyone, I recently came across this fossil online. It was listed as a metatarsal joint fragment, which to me checks out, but the person further identified it as a Dromaeosaurid [though they didn't specify based on what characters] and tentatively assigned it to Dakotaraptor based on size. Now I was wondering: Can remains this fragmental even be reliably distinguished from the other small- to medium-sized theropods in Hell Creek? The fossil was found in Hell Creek deposits in Wyoming [no info on the exact location], measures 30.9 x 27.5mm [not specified along which sides], and weighs 252 grams. Thank you for any input on this!
  2. Fish dentary?

    This was collected off of WY11, between Laramie and Centennial in Albany County, WY. Definitely limestone. It was thinly bedded, with an upper layer that's full of shelly material. There were numerous calcite veins in the rock also. This piece came from below that. I found bits and pieces of other fossil material, including some other bits that look similar, like part of a jaw. I didn't have much time to spend, so really, finding this was entirely luck and I didn't get to look for more. I'm inclined to think Forelle Limestone currently from what research I've done. I believe that limestone is upper Permian. Other units that outcrop in the area along this highway range from Pennsylvanian to Cretaceous. I'm struggling to find a geologic map with enough resolution to really tell me exactly what I'm looking for. I'm still looking for a map of the county that's not a historical map from the University of Wyoming. The forum is often pretty knowledgable though, so input is appreciated. I know there's not a whole lot of it preserved. I think it was exposed in a wash for a while so not a lot of bone is left. Not sure if there's enough left to identify. I'm not that well versed in vertebrates. I can get better pictures tomorrow. My phone camera was really struggling to focus tonight. Any ideas? Am I right in labeling it a dentary? Or is it something else entirely?
  3. Ricky’s Field Museum prep

    Hey everybody! I realized I never made a thread for my internship at the Field Museum in Chicago this summer. I interned as a fossil preparator under Akiko Shinya in the McDonald’s Fossil Preparation Laboratory (that’s the “fish bowl” lab on the second floor right next to Evolving Planet with the big window). There were some amazing things being prepared in the lab - an Antarctic Lystrosaurus, lots of Dicynodonts, Green River fish (some massive Phareodus), Sauropod femurs and ribs, a massive slab containing several sturgeon and paddlefish - but I’m not sure if I am allowed to post pictures of them, so for the sake of confidentiality I won’t just in case. This is the lab, and I always sat in the red chair, right up next to the window. One of my favorite parts of this internship was seeing all the little kids so excited about what we were doing in there and interacting with them. I was preparing a Priscacara serrata (specimen PF 16961) from the Green River formation of Wyoming, Eocene (~52 mya). All I used was a pin vise and an Amscope stereoscope. This fish also seemed to have slightly “exploded” from the pressure of fossilization as well, it’s jaw was crooked and head smashed, thought most fins seemed surprisingly well intact. The prep took 199.5 hours to complete, from May to August. I finished the prep on the final day of my internship, staying late after the museum had closed to the public and all the others in the lab had gone home. But it was far worth it, because "your name will forever be associated with this specimen." -Akiko Shinya I took a picture at the end of every day and I made a time lapse with it to see the growth! The link is at the bottom of the post. (I kept that floating scale in front of its mouth because I thought it was kind of funny that it looked like the fish was trying to eat it!) You can watch the time lapse Here
  4. Too Many Fossils

    Hello, So, I'm going to get straight to the point. I live in a small house, and I have way too many fossils right now. My entire collection consists of 35 Diplomystus, 10 Knightia, 7 Phareodus, 2 Mioplosus, 36 pieces of petrified wood, 1 fossilized sand dollar, 2 gastropod shells, some fish bone fragments, and 38 other fossils that are unidentifiable. I'm going to be up front right now, I have way too many fossils in my small house. I'm trying to figure out what to do with the excess. Does anybody have any ideas what I could do with the excess? Any help will be appreciated, Jared
  5. 4 Different IDs

    Hello, So, I have a LOT of fossils after my trip to Kemmerer, Wyoming last week. To save time on identifying them, I sorted them by what they looked like. I have 5 piles, so 5 different species. I am posting pictures of one from each pile, so I can find out what these are. The pictures are attached. The first and second I have a LOT of, the third I only have one of, and I only have three of the fourth, (The others are not as big as the one in the picture.) The fifth I am having problems uploading. It will come later. Can someone help me ID these four? I will post the fifth when I have a chance. Jared
  6. Mission Jurassic - "Badlands" of North Wyoming Children's Museum of Indianapolis - BBC News https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/extra/nxVbFidDbs/mission-jurassic Yours, Paul H.
  7. Heading to Wyoming Sunday, advice appreciated

    Hey guys and gals. I just recently moved to Ft. Collins, and I will be taking a month long fossil hunting/sight seeing excursion starting Sunday. I believe we will start off in Wyoming and head for Yellowstone, then head south to other national parks and the Grand Canyon. I plan on stopping at Fossil Safari for some nice fossil fish, but I would also like to hunt some other areas around the state. Should I just look for road cuts? Any other spots or pointers will be appreciated. If I meet up with any of you, I can bring some Florida fossils to trade for a couple of hours in your spots! Let me know! -J
  8. Here is another update from my July 2019 solo Fossil run! (Edit...it appears some of the fossil pictures are displaying poorly....I will rectify this shortly.) PICTURE HEAVY Day 1: I drove solo from Omaha, NE to Fossil Butte National Monument. I left at 0300 local and made it to the Museum at the monument about 45 minutes before they closed at 1800 local. The museum is outstanding. Small, but amazing. Also, unlike most other national parks and monuments, it is FREE and open 7 days a week during the summer. I didn't take any photos as A, I was exhausted, and B, there are plenty of pictures of the museum already on the web. Sometimes, I like to just have memories I don't have to share. Anyway, after drooling over all of the great stuff to view (think complete two meter crocodilian skeleton), I got my second wind and had to find a place to camp before dark. Thankfully, you get about 18 hours of useful sunlight up in that area, so I set out for a "secret" campsite on the BLM land just northwest of the monument proper. I found the site and made camp. There was some promising looking shale exposed here, but not a fossil to be found. (I did bring a few samples back however as I discovered later that there was some interesting fluorescence in green, yellow, and orange on some of the rock!) I'm at around 2100 meters above sea level for the night! Either way, beat down and a bit light headed from too many years living in the flat lands, I caught a nice sunset and wolfed down four MREs. I planned to spend the next day in deep in the Green River Formation. Day 2. It was a rough night. I got about two hours sleep from a combination of exhaustion, excitement, and the strangest wind storm I have ever experienced. At right around 0000, a single gust of wind dropped the temp for around 22C to 8C in less than five minutes. I was prepared for this, however I wasn't prepared for what showed up 45 minutes later- sustained 40kph winds with 72kph gusts. Due to the hard rocky ground, I couldn't use tent stakes or bury the deadmen for my guy lines on the tent, so I spent the next three hours in a very noisy, semi-collapsed tent. As the storm continued, I realized I was going to have to set the guy lines under the tires of my truck if I hoped not to blow away. Imagine my surprise to discover that with all that wind, there was not a cloud in the sky. It was crystal clear out. What I had thought was rain hitting the tent was actually small bits of gravel! I carefully positioned the truck as a bit of a wind break and anchor for the guy lines. Ten minutes later, the windstorm quit. I made twelve cups of espresso in my trusty Moka pot and headed over to American Fossil Quarry at sunrise. I didn't bother taking pictures of the quarry as there are plenty on the web. I did a half day dig. I had a most excellent time. What follows is photos of about a third of the fossils I found. I have many many more that need prep work, but these were my "practice" specimens. I found so many fish fossils, I kept only the best ones, plus a similar amount to use as practice for preparation and preservation techniques. Sure, it is a pay-to-play quarry, but I got more than my money's worth I feel. I actually got a bit bored with finding fish, something I never thought would happen. I also found some scales and coprolites, but no stingrays or plants. One fellow digging while I was there ended up with a magnificent palm leaf however! Anyway, here are a few of the fossils I have prepped so far. Apologies for the less than perfect photos. I have only owned this macro lens for a few days and haven't quite figured it out yet. Also, you will notice that they appear shiny, this is because the fixative has not fully cured yet. I will share my best two specimens in other threads later on!
  9. Please help identify my bumps.

    I am a complete novice. I have searched for fossils as a hobby but have never found anything like this. I found this near Lovell, Wyoming, near the base of the Big Horn mountains. It measures approximately 5cm x 5cm. Thanks for any help.
  10. New Bird-Like Dinosaur Unearthed in Wyoming

    http://www.sci-news.com/paleontology/hesperornithoides-miessleri-07413.html https://peerj.com/articles/7247/
  11. Advice For Getting a Shrimp Prepped?

    I found a shrimp at the American Quarry of the Greenriver Formation, and was wondering if someone knew of somebody that has done this kind of work before so I can get it prepped. Thanks in advance!
  12. Hey Gang, Was going thru another box and found a small piece that I acquired awhile back that I dont have a name for and looking for some help....if anyone has any ideas...much appreciated... Did some preliminary review of some of the Eocene pubs but nothing screamed yep thats it... From a quarry near Fossil Lake, Kemmerer, Wyoming. Green River Formation. Got some interesting fish bits in the plate as well... @piranha Thanks! Regards, Chris
  13. Today was the last day spent in Wyoming and one of the most productive. This collecting area was definitely the most scenic among the spots we visited this week with a view of a wide open grassy valley with trees lining the Little Cheyenne River. I found a channel deposit site which had been worked in years past but had not been touched recently. I remained at this spot for the duration of the day, splitting through the conglomerate. The most abundant fossils were gar scales which appeared practically every split. I collected a number of small alligator teeth, myledaphus ray teeth and triceratops and hadrosaur spit teeth. Some of my best finds were pieces of shark spine and a thescelosaurus premaxillary tooth. Views of the collecting area A view of the open space A very small myledaphus tooth (lower right side) A gar scale preserved right next to a gar tooth A small Brachychampsa tooth (rear "molar like" tooth) A shark spine preserved next to a bivalve. Stay tuned for South and North Dakota next week!
  14. Another day hunting in Wyoming's Lance formation proved more successful than yesterday. Due to the high amount of rain Wyoming has been facing this year, many would be exposures were grassed in. We started at a channel deposit which was producing a number of bone pieces. Although bones were relatively plentiful, there were no spectacular finds with the best being a thescelosaurus vertebra found by another member of the group. My best find from this hillside was a section of Triceratops jaw, a partial crown found in the conglomerate where the fossils were eroding from. and some variety of small animal limb bone (reptile or mammal). Here are some pics from this site A hadrosaur spit tooth A piece of softshell turtle shell A bivalve The Triceratops crown After most of the people had left the site, I explored the surrounding area and found an anthill which proved to be very bountiful in the microfossils it produced. I found several small crocodilian teeth, a tiny myledaphus tooth, a gar tooth and a potential mammal tooth.
  15. I've spent the last three days in Wyoming hunting fossils with Paleoprospectors. Monday was spent on the Lance fm, Tuesday on the White River fm and Wednesday was back on the Lance. The first half of Monday was spent prospecting for new sites along a wide open space. The best find happened early on when a younger guy found an Anzu claw, I was not so lucky for a while as I found only a few bone bits in a mostly scarce area. I continued walking along a ridge overlooking the open grassland until I noticed an outcropping of a light brown/orange colored rock. I decide to test my luck and hit it with my rock hammer and to my pleasure, there were abundant snail, bivalve and plant fossils inside this conglomerate. This little channel deposit raised my spirits, but I was still hungry for dinosaur and other vertebrate fossils. My little hunting buddy, a horned lizard. Some shots of the conglomerate containing the snails and other fossils: My best find from this conglomerate channel deposit was this nice bivalve Although I absolutely enjoy and appreciate finding invertebrate fossils, dinosaurs and other reptiles have my heart. The second half of Monday consisted of the group spending time hunting at a microsite. This spot was where I was most successful. Top Left: Worn alligator tooth Top Right: Paronychodon tooh (the first in my collection) Bottom: A piece of crocodilian osteoderm A section of Champsosaurus jaw A nice coprolite, maybe fish or small reptile A partial small theropod or bird toe bone A hadrosaur spit tooth A croc tooth still lying in the sand
  16. Today I went with Dr. Steve Nicklas and others from PaleoProspectors to a private ranch outside of Lusk, WY to help them excavate some Titanothere fossils from a bone bed they had discovered earlier this season ahead of the guests arriving for this week of fossil hunting. It was a hot and humid day (for Wyoming) and being in the white river formation where the white exposures reflect the light back towards you, it only made things hotter. But we dealt with the temperatures and got some awesome fossils out of the ground. I also got to keeps some fossils I found that weren't associated with the working area. Here are some pics-
  17. Reconsidering this ID

    Hi everyone, I posted this vertebra a while back and the consensus was crocodilian, however after looking online at some varanid vertebrae (namely palaeosaniwa) I see a resemblance between the two. I want to know what people think. Below are what I found online.
  18. High Desert Fossil Run 2019

    Well, I'm headed up and ready to go. Been planning this trip for five months! obviously nothing to report yet, but I'm hoping a little pre-game Q and A with you guys might help me raise the safety factor. I'm traveling solo and I have never been to Millard county. No worries though, as desert camping and travel goes, this is an easy one for me. Three weeks in the Atacama on foot was far riskier! Death Valley, the Mojave, and Baja aren't too tough. Anyway: I've been scouting the works of Smith, Wilson, and about twenty other geologists and paleontologists to try my hand at places like Cowboy Pass, Camp Canyon, the red coral of the Foote range and Marjum pass in addition to the "tourist" sites like Fossil mountain in The Barn, reliable U-Dig, Fossil Butte and the fish quarries and my childhood dream, Dinosaur National Monument. ( I blame you all for everything but UDig and Dinosaur....first heard of those other spots on here or on members sites) Right now, I'm worried about road conditions in Millard county. Very hard to find recent reports and it looks like the weather was wet and floody. I plan to BLM camp for the entire trip of only for the quiet and some armchair astronomy. I don't use GPS or Internet maps, just topos, a recent road atlas, and my trusty Brunton transit. Any safety/weather/driving tips I should know before I get there?
  19. Some of my collection

    Hello gang, As promised this is where I will share specimens from my personal collection, my grandfather's collection, and the collection that was donated to the university I work for. The latter is interesting as it is literally boxes of rock and fossils, with no information and my university does not have a geology or paleontology department. I'll be updating it every so often. Enjoy! NOTE: Some of the donated items have old school "labels" on them. If you see initials or such that you recognize, please PM me, as I am doing my best to properly catalog them properly as part of my job!
  20. White River fm. Mammal Teeth

    Hey everyone, I found these teeth in the White River fm of eastern Wyoming last summer and wanted to see what people on the forum thought they were. 1st is what I believe to be an oreodont tooth (possibly Merycoidodon). It's .8 cm wide and 1.5 cm from root to crown. 2nd I believe may be a Poebrotherium tooth but I'm unsure. It's about .5 cm wide and .9 cm long. 3rd may be from a Leptomeryx but I'm not sure. It's about .4 cm wide and .9 cm long.
  21. Muddy Wyoming Fish

    FYI @Ptychodus04 @Kittenmittens @mamlambo @Fossilis Willis @Malcolmt @DevonianDigger Well managed to get out last Friday to dig up some Green River fish from the split fish layers. These layers aren't nice and hard like the 18 inch, nor are the rarer fish as obtainable (they don't preserve as well), but you can still find some pretty cool stuff. A family next to me found a foot long Phareodus in perfect condition with a dark red color (forgot to take a picture of that). I don't think they realize just how lucky they are because those are not easy to find. The night before it rained a ton so I had a hard time getting to the quarry. The oily lime based rock wouldn't split properly until about noon but I hauled some decent Knightia's out. These aren't your prized, rare, fish but they are still a blast to dig up. Pulled out about fifty and worked all day. With all the mud and rain I seriously didn't think anyone would show up but Friday was very busy. About fifty in total came. The morning was tough. Lots of muddy rock to split and it just didn't want to split evenly. Everything would crumble on me. As you can see in the picture below things were muddy and wet. This Knightia has some pretty nice curves. Another curvaceous fossil. I'm in love. The split fish come in their varieties. Usually I only keep the ones that are completely filled in then put a sealant over them. This one looks alright considering it's a bit patchy. This one will be fun to prepare with my new CP9361 and some very careful handling of the scribe. This is one of my A grade Knightia's from the trip. Great color. The tail can be teased out a bit more. I really like how the vertebrae pop out in a 3D manner. Keep on fossiling!
  22. Hello all! I am new to this forum and just started getting interested in rocks and fossils. I went out to Wyoming last weekend and found a lot of really nice agates and fluorescent minerals but I also came across what look like some pieces of chalcedony with these white tubular inclusions in them. I first just saw the shell imprint in the rock so I pocketed it, but later when I looked closer noticed the white webbed tubes. I posted these pictures on reddit in r/fossilid and got a few responses telling me that they are Bryozoans. I looked this up and it looks right to me! My question is this...all of the pictures of fossilized bryozoans I have seen look very traditional (in sedimentary rock). Is it usual to find them embedded in silicate like this? I cannot find one other example of this on the internet which makes me think that maybe this type of specimen is called by a different name and that I am just not searching for the right thing. Anyways, any help and insights would be much appreciated! I am going back out to Wyoming this weekend to search some more and would love to know exactly what it is I am looking for! Thanks in advance for any responses! Erik
  23. ?? Bone or just interesting rock?

    Didn't pay much attention when I picked this up, just noticed it was interesting. It was a surface find and I guessed I would figure it out later. Any ideas? Found this somewhere south of Wamsutter, WY.
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