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Found 319 results

  1. Mioplosus labracoides?

    I’m pretty sure this is a Mioplosus labracoides, but I would like some confirmation before I label and frame it. Found in Wyoming, green river formation.
  2. Coprolite fossil ID

    Found this “piece of snarge” fossil on a fossil trip in Kemmerer Wyoming.. Piece of snarge? Coprolite? It’s a pun, get it? Seriously though, they think it’s either crocodilian or turtle in origin. What do you guys think? Anyway to tell? it’s pretty cool. I’ve got lots of other fossils to share later.
  3. Belated 2019 Road Trip Fossils

    Last year, to celebrate finishing my undergraduate degree, my girlfriend and I went on a long (9,000+ mile) road trip around the western US and at long last (a little over a year since their discovery) the last of the fossils we found are out of the refrigerator and I’ve finally gotten all of them photographed. Here are some of the highlights and best fossils we found. A rough map of the route of the trip While the trip wasn’t entirely fossil centric we wanted to hunt at a few cool spots along the way. We chose to visit 5 fossil locations, the first of which was Clarkia Fossil Bowl in Idaho, a fantastic location for Miocene age leaves (Langhian Stage, ~15Mya) tucked behind a motocross track. These poor fossils have been through it all in the year between when they were found and when I finally got them dry. They’ve been soaked several times, gone mouldy twice, frozen at least once and flown across the Atlantic Ocean, all before spending the last 8 months in the refrigerator. Amazingly all but two of them survived perfectly including one of my favourite finds, a tiny flower. A maple leaf (genus Acer) still partly covered in matrix but with the stem intact. At some point I hope to get this one prepared. The best leaf find of the trip, with beautiful red coloration and mottling from fungus. A partial leaf, with beautiful vein preservation. The next spot was the American Fossil quarry in Kemmerer Wyoming to look for Eocene fish (Green River Formation, Ypresian Stage, ~53-48Mya). Splitting though the material left out by the quarry we found a few fish, primarily Knightia and Diplomystus. The best Knightia, including the best fish of the day with its head still partly covered. Some of the Diplomystus. The first needs some repair as it broke through the tail. The second has a counterpart as well and I’m hoping to frame it soon. And a mystery fish, I don’t know what species this is, it could just be Knightia or Diplomystus but it doesn’t look like the others we found. The star find came close to the end of the time at the quarry, a section of a puddle layer packed full of Knightia, at least a dozen fish piled on top of each other. The quarry manager was kind enough to let me take the blocks without splitting them thinner since the material is full of fractures and likely would not have survived. The layer as it split in the quarry (US size 13 hiking boot acting as a rough scale). The three pieces I managed to recover. The blocks are currently in a storage unit in Washington until I can figure out how to get them prepared. I am hoping the first two pieces can be reunited and the part and counterpart can be mounted side by side but I’m unsure about how to accomplish this. If anyone who prepares Green River fish has any ideas please let me know. The third locality we visited was Westgard pass in Inyo California, hunting for Cambrian archaeocyathids (Poleta Formation, Cambrian Stage 3, ~ 520Mya). We were only there a short time as there was a lot of driving to do that day, but I still managed to find one example in cross section. My girlfriend was more lucky, finding four examples. These are our favourites, particularly the third, which exhibits some dimensionality in addition to the cross-section. I’m absolutely thrilled to find anything Cambrian, and to make things even better the fossil locality is just down the road from the Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest, home to living trees more than 4,000 years old and one of my favourite spots on the whole trip. We also visited Capitola Beach to search for rolled cetacean bone. I found two examples with one clearly showing the cancellous internal bone texture. To cap off the trip I wanted to do a fossil hunt in my home state of Washington. Since I still don’t know where to go to look for the elusive Pulalius crab, we decided to search the West Twin River site for shrimp concretions (Pysht Fomration, Oligocene, ~22-33Mya). We found over a dozen of these containing partial shrimp. I think they are all Callianopsis clallamensis since this is a common species at this locality. The first concretion that I found after identifying the right material. Another shrimp nodule containing a large section of claw. The head of a shrimp. Two non-crustaceans, a gastropod internal mould and a beautiful white bivalve in a small concretion. A mystery concretion with something eroding out from both ends. And last, one of the strangest concretions I have ever seen. The outside is hardened but the inside is a soft clay consistency with several bits of shrimp shell, completely the opposite of the hard in the middle concretions I’m used to. In all, it was a fantastic trip. I would love to go back to all the sites we visited, and there is so much more to explore next time I’m stateside. I’m looking forward to getting out hunting again. Stay tuned for the next big trip to celebrate finishing our masters. Benton
  4. Scale found at Green River WY

    New member here. Just got back from a trip to Green River Quarry in WY. My daughter found a sting ray the second day! She also found this large scale. Wanted to see if anyone could identify what it came off of? Thanks!
  5. History Hounds - Wyoming discovery

    I found a brachiospongia that has a full chimney and a top and bottom. Tell me what you think. It is like the one found in Canada.
  6. Hey Everybody---I haven't posted in a long time. I am planning a trip up to Great Falls, Montana on the 19th of Sept, and I am going to slowly drive back to Texas over the following five days. I just want to see that area of the country mostly but it would be great to do some road-side fossil hunting on the way. Can anybody suggest a route or area where I could do that? I'm just feeling adventuress. Feel free to IM me. I will not steal your spots or tell anyone about them and if you are ever down here in central Texas I can return the favor. Let me know and thanks!
  7. Way back in 2012 I found some blue crocodile bones in southwestern Wyoming and showed you folks some of them. I started prepping them back then and put them down for other projects. This spring as Covid19 kept me at home for a few weeks, I continued prepping this stuff. I wish I could tell you guys how many hours I have on this, but I am afraid to add them up. The first photo shows what this looked like at the end of 2012, until earlier this year. and as of today, it is done. I can ID most of these bones, except the long wide one on the top left of the block. I love the blue colors on these. In the nextfew days I will try to provide you guys with a key yo these bones, but if y'all want to try to ID them... the challenge has been set. (Note, some are turtle bones). This one is my favorite... cool bone, exceptional coloring... a cervical rib.
  8. Stegosaurus Tooth?

    I acquired this tooth some years ago, and it was labeled as a stegosaurus tooth. However, I am having some difficulties distinguishing if it indeed comes from a stegosaurus or perhaps an ankylosaur or nodosaur. It comes from the Morrison Formation of Wyoming. Each tick mark on the last pic is a mm. What do you all think? Thanks!
  9. History Hounds - Wyoming discovery

    Please help me in identifying this spectacular fossil. I believe it is a spider crab. Any information would be helpful. It is about a foot across.
  10. Leaf Fossils

    I purchased these 2 fossils a few years back at a show in California. I am trying to identify them......Thanks, Augie
  11. Paleocene Plants

    I have tried without confidence on my IDs for these finds from Sweetwater County, Wyoming. I suspect Sycamore?? It would be great to get these labeled properly!!!! 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
  12. Priscicara serrata

    From the album Green River Formation

    Priscicara serrata from the Green River Formation. Air abrasion performed by @Ptychodus04
  13. Green River Fish ID

    Here is a large partial fish I found a few weeks ago. Not sure, but suspecting maybe Phareodus?? Any thoughts? Thanks, Mike
  14. Hello. A while ago I purchased this specimen from a highly reputable and established seller. It's a T-Rex jaw fragment from Lance Creek, Wyoming, and was a surface find (see photos of the original specimen in situ; according to the finder, "the piece in question is at the very bottom left, on top of the edge of the longer bigger bone; the tooth grooves are face-down."). I'm reaching out to Fossil Forum for guidance along the following lines: 1) What part of the jaw is this most likely from? I've been studying images on-line at a cursory level, but I can't find the distinction convex part of the bone that my specimen has (the part that sticks out like a thin ridge). Any thoughts or, even better, photos of comparable specimens? 2) I trust the original seller, but since it was not found as part of a larger Rex specimen, I figured I'd ask for your confirmation: is this almost certainly a T-Rex? I'm fairly knowledgeable regarding teeth, but not mandibles. Thank you all very much in advance; any insight would be deeply appreciated. With best regards and gratitude, Ryan
  15. Wyoming Wonderland

    It has been 10 days since my trip to Wyoming came to a close. I have done a rough cleaning of my finds and will display some of them for you. To begin with, I had a continuing education class in Jackson. The scenery around the Tetons is truly breath taking. But I was eager to depart and begin a fossil hunting adventure with the 3 free days I had left. I love my bald eagles and found this photogenic pair as I departed town. My first stop was NE of Farson in an attempt to find some petrified palm wood. Here is the "road" which brought me to where I thought I should be. No petrified wood was found but I did put a few specimens in my bucket. I believe these are some algal structures??? They littered the butte that I was hunting on. This was not the start that I wanted, but just enjoying the openness of the Wyoming countryside made up for the lack of finds. I finished the day by taking in this sunset before departing. Tomorrow will be a new day and the fossil gods may be kinder, at least I hope. The next site is south of Wamsutter, and the hopeful finds will be "Turritella agate". This Green River Formation (Lamey Member) fresh water snail species is really Elimia tenera, not turritella. I must thank @jpc for directing me there without a hitch. This site appeared on google earth to be a hop, skip, and a jump from the gravel road. It is MANY MANY JUMPS!!! Had he not told me to continue until I saw these hills, I would have experienced my second failure. As you approach the hills, the road forks and the right fork takes you up on top giving you this view. UP top, Elimia are everywhere, for miles and miles!!! Every dark rock in this next photo' foreground contains them. An individual rock typical of what you see in the previous photo:
  16. Prepping Wyoming Finds

    Prep help needed!!!!! 1. Blue Forest petrified wood. I have used a chisel and an engraver to remove most of the algal growth on the outside of the wood. Is there a chemical means to remove the fine stuff that remains without hurting the wood or the blue agate?? 2. Individual silicified shells of the fossil snail Goniobasis (Turritella Agate) found at Wamsutter, Wyoming. Again, is there a chemical way to remove the tan coating on many of these. Even if it took the shell away, I am most interested in preserving the beautiful silicified interiors of these shells. I have tried vinegar and potassium chloride with NO success. Thanks, Mike
  17. I found this fossil in a mountain stream near Lovell, Wyoming. I was wondering what species it could be? It has a shell like some kind of clam. It also has 3 reddish brown stones in it that shimmer in the light. Could these be pearls? The rest of the fossil doesn’t have any reflective gleam in the light. I added blue arrows and circles to show where the possible pearls are at. The whole fossil is about 1 and 10/16 inch long x 1 and 1/4 inch wide x 3/4 inch in height (from the back of the shell to the tip of the highest pearl). Thanks!
  18. Posted this a few days but I didn’t have appropriate glue on hand. Now that it’s together, it definitely seems more tubular. Maybe a very weathered limb bone?
  19. My wife and I went on a 7500+ mile ramble to break out of our COVID doldrums. Due to the virus we had to change up many of our original plans... which conversely added a number of additional fossil hunting locals as they allowed us to mostly avoid our fellow humans and maintain social distancing by many many miles. As part of our trip preparations my wife sewed us a number of masks, including a whole series of fossil hunting masks for me. Originally we were supposed to stay in Chicago, but we elected to avoid staying in the city, so we only got to do a drive by We started the trip with a bonus dig, meeting up with fellow forum member @minnbuckeye for a guided Ordovician hunt in Fennimore, Wisconsin (THANKS MIKE!) Unfortunately I neglected to take pics of the site so I will only be able to share a farm pic we passed on the way. Mike was a gracious host who kicked off the visit with a gift of several fossil samples from his home turf As with all of the fossils from this trip, all finds are as they arrived back home, no prep. Some of our finds from Fennimore:
  20. Here’s another bone. Thinking it’s a ceratopsian skull part, but can’t match it to anything. Thanks! Edit: Now with more bones! The overall shape is arched with central canal.
  21. Lance Formation Bone

    Unknown bone from Lance Formation. Thanks in advance!
  22. Unidentified lance fm bone.

    Hi all, I was wondering if anyone can identify this for me my guess is triceratops frill but I’m not an expert.tia
  23. Tuesday on the White River

    Hello everyone! know I've been slacking on updates on my three week trip to Wyoming with PaleoProspectors, but I promise I will post some more of my finds and do a full recap of last week's adventure as soon as I can. As for tonight, I'll share my experience hunting in the white river formation today, A view of where I began my day hunting. My first find: A section of Paleolagus (rabbit) jaw. Next I found a native american artifact After entering a larger area of exposures I came across this Mesohippus (horse) jaw.
  24. For those who enjoy solitude and quiet away from large crowds of people, visiting the Blue Forest of Wyoming is probably one of the best choices. I personally love the most remote places possible, so I enjoy Blue Forest but those of you accustomed to living in or near a busy city may find it unsettling (or so I've been told). It can get busy during the summer, but overall it tends to be pretty quiet especially the further away from the road you go. I was able to visit the site last month and I found some very cool things. The drive out to the site really isn't too long in my opinion, but it's really not a site to spend 20 minutes at expecting to find a lot of big logs. Most of the really big logs have been found, so a lot of patience and persistence can (but won't always) pay off. Let me just say that if you plan to dig, it gets pretty warm out there. You'll need to take breaks throughout the day and rehydrate if you aren't acclimated to the dry heat. There was no wind when I was there and only occasionally would a few clouds dot across the sky so don't count on shade being there unless you bring a canopy with you. The first couple days started off a bit lackluster as far as digging was concerned. I wasn't finding much by digging, but when I surface collected I found a lot of nice small pieces. Different people have different methods of searching for petrified wood here. Some dig blindly, some probe and then dig, some witch for petrified wood, some probe existing holes, and some just surface collect. Each method has its merits. There has been a lot of digging here over the years, so the landscape is dotted with holes all over, some of which have been filled (if you dig here, please refill your holes so BLM doesn't try to shut the site down). I was finding a lot of nice small pieces on the surface where other people had been digging, but I was hopeful of digging up my own log. I'd heard about a few other people finding some small logs when I was there, but most said the same thing: they'd all disentegrated when they tried to remove them. The petrified wood here can be pretty delicate. It is encased in layers of algae, but extracting the wood from the algae can be difficult and often results in separation of the agate layer from the wood or even the log splintering completely.
  25. Hi all... A friendly shameless plug to invite you folks to tune in to PBS here in the states (and maybe Canada) this evening for the second installment of Prehistoric Road Trip. Check your local listings. https://www.pbs.org/show/prehistoric-road-trip/ I will doing the Happy Fossil Dance (it is in the previews) with the Tate Museum's rex, named Lee Rex. (My dance moves are better than Lee's, but not as good as host Emily's). Pickles the dog is sitting this one out, which is good, because her ego was out of control after last week's show. For those not in the USA, the show will be available for viewing (in Enbglish) after it airs. On the same link, but for a limited time only.
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