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Found 270 results

  1. Hi it is my Birthday today, and since it is my birthday I was going to get some fossils. I found this and am wondering if it’s a genuine tooth and if it’s a T-rex or not, if that’s possible through the sellers photos.
  2. Ammonite Identification Help

    This is an ammonite out of an old teaching collection. Can some one help me with an identification? The tag (which after 40 years may not be the correct tag) indicates Prionocyelus, Niobrara Formation Albany County, Wyoming. The ammonite is 2.1 inches in diameter.
  3. Knightia - both?

    Good evening folks. I have two fish, both listed as Knightia and both from Farson Wyoming. They look similar but they don't look like the same species to me, am I wrong? These are 10 and 11 year old purchases with the first being dug in the 60's from "near Farson" and the second stating it is from the Green River Formation, Farson.
  4. Planning another summer ramble across a wide swath of the US for siteseeing and fossil hunting. Going to hit some previous sites like Kemmerer and Big Cedar Ridge in Wyoming along with planned stops for a guided dino excursion at a private ranch in eastern Montana and a trilobite dig at Theisen quarry in Oklahoma. I will be zigzagging across much of Montana and Wyoming and would be interested in other suggested stops on the way if anyone has anything they are willing to share. Not looking for someones secret stash, just publicly known places the wife and I might be able to stop for an hour or two as we roll through. We will also be traveling through places like western Nebraska, Oklahoma, southern Alabama, etc. I am interested in any era, invertebrate, vertebrate, plant. Looking to expand my personal collection and maybe pick up a few pieces to trade or auction off here. I have the most flexibility while in the north, but I have been trying to see if I can detour to squeeze in at least a little Alabama carboniferous as I have seen many beautiful specimens posted and I love plant fossils. We shall see. I have the rockhounding guides for the northern states and have tagged several possibilities, I have also been combing through previous posts and searching other references online. I would love to identify an ammonite location along the way as I have never managed to collect one myself. Thanks in advance, Randy
  5. Green River Fish Amia Head???

    Hello everyone, I'm looking for a second opinion on this piece, a fish head from the green river fauna, while I believe it maybe Amia due to comparisons I'm not to confident, any help/guidance is and will be appreciated.
  6. White River fm. tooth

    Hi everyone, I found this tooth over the summer in the White River formation of Wyoming. When I stumbled upon it, the tooth was already "exploded" into several pieces, so I glued it in place and dug around it, taking it out as a cemented chunk of dirt. At first I thought it was a young Archaeotherium canine, then I wasn't so sure and thought maybe Hyaenodon, I could be wrong and may not be predator at all as I know the rhinos, oreodonts and titanotheres all have canine teeth. A good amount of the crown is preserved along with several pieces of the root, however it is not complete and may be missing some vital pieces which could help us answer the question. the crown is around an inch and a half in length.
  7. Very tiny fossil

    So, I was interested in looking at Copralite under a magnifier. I got it it Kemmerer, Wyoming. I saw something very weird that I could not see with the naked eye, only a magnifier at the highest setting. Attached are 4 pictures. one of the copralite without the magnifier, one zoomed in low, one zoomed in high, and a fourth I will explain later As you can see, there are tiny "Bug like things" in the rock. They all have legs, and what look like antennae. The fourth picture shows them traveling in a perfect arc towards something. A behavioral fossil discovery perhaps? I have no idea what these black things are. Can someone try to help me?
  8. Hiodon Falcatus?

    I found this Green River fish at the American Fossil quarry about 4 years ago. I think it could be a Hiodon Falcatus, thoughts? Thanks for the help!
  9. Amphiplaga brachyptera?

    I found this Green River fish this fall while at the Warfield quarry. It is too different from a Knightia and the best match I could find is Amphiplaga brachyptera. Thoughts?
  10. Cockerellites liops

  11. Mioplosus labracoides

  12. Cockerellites liops (Cope 1877)

    From the album Pisces

    13cm. long 18 inch layer Fossil Butte Member Green River Formation Middle Eocene Fossil Lake, Kemmerer, Wyoming, USA
  13. Hi there! Now that Christmas and New Year's are done, I'm trying to continue organizing and labeling my fossils before I head back to work on Monday. I'm hoping I can get some help from you regarding the identities of 2 specimens: Specimen #1: a brachiopod from the Miocene (Burdigalian) of Sesimbra, Portugal: Specimen #2: two fish from the Eocene Green River Formation of Kemmerer, Wyoming: (fish on the left:) (fish on the right:) Thanks in advance for your help! Monica
  14. 2 things

    First off, I suffered a leg injury while duck hunting and I almost died. No, I was not shot by another hunter, I slipped and fell in freezing cold water. I am just letting you all know I am okay. Second, I need an honest opinion on this fossil I decided to hang on the wall. Does it look good in the frame? Should I add anything else to the label? Any ideas will be appreciated.
  15. Fossil Bone or just rock?

    Hi again-any ideas on this one? Found loose on the ground in Wyoming. Think its fossil material or just rock? thanks for your time
  16. Fossil identification

    I found this palm sized fossil in a river in riverton Wyoming and would like to know if anyone knows what it could be
  17. Possible jaw bone

    I purchased two bones from a seller in Wyoming about 10 years ago and cannot figure out what animal they are from. It's about 3 inches. Can anyone help? Bone #1 is pictured below:
  18. An Eocene summer

    It was a busy summer, and now it is snowing. I got out a few times this summer and here is my report for y'all's enjoyment. Most of my outings were into Wyoming's early Eocene. Way back in the spring I went to a newly discovered mammal site. I showed one jaw here: Here is a view of the site. This is the early Eocene Wind River Fm in central WY. (Wasathcian in age). Lots of land to look at out here, and I have only prospected a wee bit of it. My pack is down thereon the flats... let's see if we can find any fossils down there. OH, look... a mammal jaw. And can you find an additional bonus tooth in there? Right next to this there were a group of crocodile bones. Again... find the bones. I dug around quite a bit to try to find the source of these bones and got totally skunked. I usually get out into the Eocene beds of southwest WY on Labor day, but this year it happened a month late, so here are some pix from the first weekend of October. It starts getting cold at this time of year. The first photo is me at an abandoned oil well site where the oil folks had scraped up a limestone layer in their bulldozing. The layer has bones in it... mostly turtle pieces and lots of very small (and practically un-prepable) fish bones. If you break rocks long enough you will find good stuff. Below are a the best things I found on this visit. For those interested, these things are prepped with ye ole air abrasive under the microscope. Dolomite at about 20 psi. There is potential for the air abrasive to abrade the bones and I am not sure if these teeth got overly air abraded or are suffering form Eocene erosion. It is very slow prep, so I don't focus too much on this layer. First a little croc dentary. Note that the bone runs off the edge of the rock. I spent a long time looking for the rock that contains the rest of this jaw... again, skunked. But this is a good little find. The empty roundish area to the right of the jaw is the impression of a snail. fresh water snails of the genus Physa are the most common fossils. This next bone is the angular bone of a small croc. The angular is one of the bones in the lower jaw. The limestone layer is in the Wasatch Formation. After busting up enough rocks, I went to one of my favorite sites about a half mile away. Also in the Wasatch Fm. This layer sits just above the same limestone layer that I collected at the oil well site. Here I am digging. Note the weather is getting nicer; I have jettisoned the coat. This site is full of small randomly distributed fossils. Again, mostly turtle pieces, but also some good croc material and occasional mammal teeth and jaws. And here is a distant view of the quarry. The limestone with bones is seen as an small cliff just below my backpack. So, let's look at a few fossils. First an emerging soft shelled turtle piece ( a costal plate). That is a dental pick for scale. The digging here is best done slowly so you don't break the bones. You can see other pieces of bones in here. The first photo in the next post is the same turtle piece fully exposed.
  19. Learned something.

    Hello everyone! So, a bit of a long story. I have a habit of looking at my fossils under a magnifier. Today, I was looking at a knightia fossil and I decided to theorize a little bit about it after looking at it. After looking at it for a little bit, I told myself that it looks like a sardine. After I did that, I went on the internet to take a look at the family of knightia as well as a family of herrings and sardines. to my surprise, my theory was correct. Knightia and herrings and sardines share the family clupeidae. You learn something new everyday! Jared
  20. Tiny Fossil

    Hello, I was organizing my fossils I got in Kemmerer, Wyoming, today. I stopped to look at a small Phareodus fossil I had. I noticed something I never noticed before. I took the fossil and put the odd thing I noticed under a magnifier. Picture it attached. I am not going to lie, it is TINY. It has ridges one one side as well as 7 lines coming from the dark part. Any idea what it is? Could it be a plant, or part of a fish? Jared
  21. Possible WY Jurassic Fossils?

    I was hoping someone would recognize this odd assortment of shapes and point me toward a reference. The were all collected from the same road cut on Highway 89 not to far from Smoot, Wyoming. The paper in the picture is 8.5X11 inches (roughly 20X30cm). They are notable because they are large pieces in a matrix that a least on the surface fragments into small pieces. There were alot of curved pieces that are about an inch thick with a very regular curvature like broken pieces of ceramic pipe. Thanks!
  22. Hi friends, I'm trying to learn more about Green River fish. Interested to know if anyone sees anything wrong with this fossil (repair, restoration, coloring/painting, composite). The color seems slightly darker to me than the typical Green River fish that I've seen but it's not dark enough for the 18 inch layer fish that I've seen.... so that's part of why I'm curious/asking. Thank your for your insights.
  23. Good evening, today was THE day for me. In our city was the annual fair with fossils on offer. I was out and looking for uncommon/rare dino teeth and was lucky to find some. I know that most of the ID done by the sellers is wrong I would like to show my new aqusitions to you throughout the next days and hope for your help. No. 1 was sold as an "Richardoestesia gilmorei" from the Hell Creek Formation, Wyoming, USA (unfortunately no county provided). Length: 18mm Width (base) 6mm denticle count: Side 1: 6 per 1mm Side 2: 7 per 1 mm, (ca. 38 per 5 mm) I had to call it side 1 and side 2 because honestly I was not able to figure out which side is the mesial and distal side... Thank you very much for your help!
  24. Rugose or Bryozoan?

    Is this a rugose coral or a bryozoan? There are definite bryozoans in this rock of different types. I was thinking it's a rugose coral, but want other eyes on this specimen. Collected from the Phosphoria Formation in Wyoming, so it's Permian in age.
  25. What do y'all think these are? They're bits of debris from a slide I was working on. All I can really tell you is that they were photographed at 40X magnification, scale bar 50 microns. This set of slides is across the Paleocene to Eocene, but I unfortunately don't know what rock this single slide sample is from. Sample is from the Hanna Basin in Wyoming.
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