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Found 33 results

  1. Strange bone pattern

    I found this shard of bone on the York River in the Yorktown formation, and the pattern on one side is curious. I’m wondering if anyone has seen this, or if it’s a diagnostic texture? Thanks for any help!
  2. York River prize

    Just one tooth from the York River in Virginia this weekend... but I’ll take it!
  3. Thoughts on This?

    Hello! Anyone have any ideas? I believe we are looking in the Yorktown Formation in Virginia. Found right next to Lots of Chesapecten Shells. It feels like stone but is a very strange shape. Almost all the stone coming out of the layer is pebbles and somewhat rounded.
  4. These shells all look similar in nature except the last one, pictured by itself. Any way to identify, specifically? Thank You! Freshwater Creek, very slick light brown clay bottom which is blue grey once penetrated and dug. Also sand.
  5. Possible Toe Bone

    Good evening, i found a bone that I believe to be a toe bone of a mastodon or mammoth. The bone was found in the Neuse River in Craven County, NC. Thank you in advance for assistance in identifying this piece.
  6. Bone ID request

    Good morning, second post today! I found this bone in the Neuse River in Craven County/ Eastern NC. The shape of the bone is throwing me off on my google search. Can anyone identify the bone? Apps size is 3.5 inches by 3 inches. Thank you
  7. Bone ID Request

    Good morning, I am requesting help with ID on a bone I found in the Neuse River in Craven County in eastern NC NC. I have searched google but not able to find a bone of this shape. It measures 2 inches by 2.5 inches. What throws me is the twist in the bone, probably a result of excessive wearing in the River. Thank you
  8. Globidens alabamaensis?

    While collecting at a location in SE Virginia which produces a mixture of material from the Eocene Nanjemoy Formation and late Miocene/early Pliocene Yorktown Formation, I was shocked to find what I believe to be a cretaceous Globidens sp. anterior tooth fragment. My only explanation for this would be that it must have been redeposited into the Eocene beds and finally exposed with rest of the material. The texture is classic Globidens. The only other species with a slightly similar texture found within these formations (though still markedly different), would be Squalodon sp., however if the tooth were more complete it would clearly prove to be hollow with a conical interior consistent with squamates like mosasaurs. The fragment is approximately 7/8" x 1/2". This is the first bit of possibly cretaceous material I have found from these exposures, so it would be quite interesting if the general consensus is a Globidens sp. Your thoughts would be much appreciated! Thanks, Ash
  9. Possible Mastodon Tooth Fragment

    Good afternoon, I went out to the beach by the old scout hut at Cherry Point and found several interesting items. I believe two of the pieces are fragments of a mastodon tooth. I will try to post as many pictures as possible. Thank you
  10. I haven’t been keeping any Ecphoras that I find because I have all I want but this one looked like it could be pretty big. Turned out not to be very big but big enough to be interesting. It was found in a river outcrop with a little bit exposed. Normally small ones can be easily cleaned with a toothbrush and soapy water but bigger ones tend to have cracks. This one had plenty of cracks and rotten spots that made it fragile. It had to be preserved with vinac. Here are some pics during prep.
  11. Posterior Megs?

    Hi all, the other day I went out hunting found some really cool stuff, which I'll post soon, but I find these 3 interesting teeth which I think are posterior megs, though I think one (smallest) is more likely than the other two. They were found in Havelock NC.
  12. Found this in a location known as yorktown - I know part of the formation nearby is rushmere member zone two, but I am not sure if the place I found this would also be considered as such but it was found among similar items, tube worms, ecphora quadristata, diadora and slipper shells. I've found a few pieces of this shell before but they have not preserved well so I'm very excited to finally have a whole specimen of this unique and beautiful shell and anticipate getting an exact ID on it! Is this a Margaritaria abrupta? Let me know if additional photos are needed to aid.
  13. Aurora NC bone to ID

    When I stopped by the Aurora Fossil Festival a few weeks ago I was able to spend 1/2 hr or so sieving at one of the piles that are brought in for the festival. The piles include Pungo River Marl (lower Miocene) and Yorktown Formation (lower Pliocene) as well as possible Chowan River Formation (late Pliocene) and James City Formation (Pleistocene) material. Besides an assortment of the usual small shark and ray teeth, I found the following bone. Any suggestions as to a possible ID would be appreciated. Don
  14. Tiniest Ecphora Ever

    Last week on a trip to the Tar River I brought home several decent sized Ecphora quadricostata along with an assortment of other gastropods and bivalves. This was on the same trip I found the Gannet ulna. While cleaning matrix from one of the larger ecphora's today, I found this teenie tiny ecphora quadricostata. It is 13.6 mm (.53 inch) long and 11.4 mm (.45 inch) wide. Here it is in a standard 4.35 inch by 3.35 inch riker mount.
  15. North Carolina Pliocene Bird Bone

    I found this bone today in Edgecombe County North Carolina on the Tar River, upper Yorktown Formation, Rushmere member. The area is well known for Chesapectens along with other bivalves and gastropods. I looked at the Smithsonian publication, Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina, III. Miocene and Pliocene Birds from the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina. Storrs L. Olson and Pamela C. Rasmussen. Issued May 11, 2001. After searching the many plates I found one that is a pretty good match. The proximal end of right ulna of Morus peninsularis. a Gannet. I am looking for your opinions on this. @Auspex It is plate 14 page 333. I would love to have this positively I.D.'d. It was found in the formation, partially exposed and 2 pieces. They fit together well. Overall length is 144.4 mm or 5.68 inch.
  16. Can anyone help I'd this partial gastropod? Found it in the pliocene Yorktown Formation. It appears to have been pretty big in life. Thanks!
  17. Miocene horse tooth?

    I found this in a river in Virginia -- miocene Yorktown Formation. Does this look like a miocene horse? Maybe it's a modern horse tooth that got washed into the river? Any help from the experts appreciated! Matt
  18. Possibly Astrangia sp a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coral Specimen - possibly Astrangia sp.? SITE LOCATION: Yorktown formation Beaufort County, Aurora, North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Unknown genus, possibly Astrangia sp. Corals are marine invertebrates in the class Anthozoa of phylum Cnidaria. They typically live in compact colonies of many identical individual polyps. The group includes the important reef builders that inhabit tropical oceans and secrete calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton. A coral "group" is a colony of myriad genetically identical polyps. Each polyp is a sac-like animal typically only a few millimeters in diameter and a few centimeters in length. A set of tentacles surround a central mouth opening. An exoskeleton is excreted near the base. Over many generations, the colony thus creates a large skeleton that is characteristic of the species. Individual heads grow by asexual reproduction of polyps. Corals also breed sexually by spawning: polyps of the same species release gametes simultaneously over a period of one to several nights around a full moon. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa
  19. Possibly Astrangia sp a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Coral Specimen - possibly Astrangia sp.? SITE LOCATION: Yorktown formation Beaufort County, Aurora, North Carolina TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Unknown genus, possibly Astrangia sp. Corals are marine invertebrates in the class Anthozoa of phylum Cnidaria. They typically live in compact colonies of many identical individual polyps. The group includes the important reef builders that inhabit tropical oceans and secrete calcium carbonate to form a hard skeleton. A coral "group" is a colony of myriad genetically identical polyps. Each polyp is a sac-like animal typically only a few millimeters in diameter and a few centimeters in length. A set of tentacles surround a central mouth opening. An exoskeleton is excreted near the base. Over many generations, the colony thus creates a large skeleton that is characteristic of the species. Individual heads grow by asexual reproduction of polyps. Corals also breed sexually by spawning: polyps of the same species release gametes simultaneously over a period of one to several nights around a full moon. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Cnidaria Class: Anthozoa
  20. Turitella alticostata a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Turitella alticostata Gastropod SITE LOCATION: Yorktown Formation, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Turritella is a genus of medium-sized sea snails with an operculum, marine gastropod mollusks in the family Turritellidae. They have tightly coiled shells, whose overall shape is basically that of an elongated cone. The name Turritella comes from the Latin word turritus meaning "turreted" or "towered" and the diminutive suffix -ella. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Sorbeoconcha Family: Turritellidae Genus: Turritella Species: †alticostata
  21. Turitella alticostata a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Turitella alticostata Gastropod SITE LOCATION: Yorktown Formation, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Turritella is a genus of medium-sized sea snails with an operculum, marine gastropod mollusks in the family Turritellidae. They have tightly coiled shells, whose overall shape is basically that of an elongated cone. The name Turritella comes from the Latin word turritus meaning "turreted" or "towered" and the diminutive suffix -ella. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Gastropoda Order: Sorbeoconcha Family: Turritellidae Genus: Turritella Species: †alticostata
  22. Ostrea compressirorostra a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ostrea compressirorostra Bivalve SITE LOCATION: Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Ostrea is a genus of edible oysters, marine bivalve mollusks in the family Ostreidae, the oysters. This genus is very ancient. It is known in the fossil records from the Permian to the Quaternary (age range: from 259 to 0.0 million years ago). Fossil shells of these molluscs can be found all over the world. Genus Ostrea includes about 150 extinct species. Ostrea compressirostra is a species of prehistoric saltwater oyster, a fossil that is found in the Eastern United States. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Ostreoida Family: Ostreidae Genus: †Ostrea Species: †compressirorostra
  23. Ostrea compressirorostra a.JPG

    From the album MY FOSSIL Collection - Dpaul7

    Ostrea compressirorostra Bivalve SITE LOCATION: Yorktown Formation, Aurora, Beaufort Co., North Carolina, USA TIME PERIOD: Pliocene age (5.333 million to 2.58 million years ago) Data: Ostrea is a genus of edible oysters, marine bivalve mollusks in the family Ostreidae, the oysters. This genus is very ancient. It is known in the fossil records from the Permian to the Quaternary (age range: from 259 to 0.0 million years ago). Fossil shells of these molluscs can be found all over the world. Genus Ostrea includes about 150 extinct species. Ostrea compressirostra is a species of prehistoric saltwater oyster, a fossil that is found in the Eastern United States. Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Mollusca Class: Bivalvia Order: Ostreoida Family: Ostreidae Genus: †Ostrea Species: †compressirorostra
  24. Bird bone from Aurora, NC?

    I have been told this bone is avian, probably miocene but could be pliocene. The striations are perplexing to me. From Aurora, NC. Ruler scale is in cm. I'd like to know what family it may belong to if possible
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