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Found 75 results

  1. Otodus, cretalamna?

    Guys I’m having trouble determining whether this. Is a cretalamna appendiculata lower or an otodus obliquus
  2. Some sheppey teeth

    Hi guys here are some teeth that need I would really appreciate some help identifying I will upload some more later today 1. I can’t decide between hypotodus verticalis and jaekelotodus robustus
  3. The open access paper is: Smith, V., Warny, S., Grice, K., Schaefer, B., Whalen, M.T., Vellekoop, J., Chenot, E., Gulick, S.P., Arenillas, I., Arz, J.A. and Bauersachs, T., 2020. Life and death in the Chicxulub impact crater: A record of the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. Climate of the Past Discussions, pp.1-17. Related open access papers are: Smith, V., Warny, S., Jarzen, D.M., Demchuk, T., Vajda, V. and Expedition 364 Science Party, 2020. Palaeocene–Eocene miospores from the Chicxulub impact crater, Mexico. Part 1: spores and gymnosperm pollen. Palynology, 44(3), pp.473-487 Smith, V., Warny, S., Jarzen, D.M., Demchuk, T., Vajda, V. and Gulick, S.P., 2020. Paleocene–Eocene palynomorphs from the Chicxulub impact crater, Mexico. Part 2: angiosperm pollen. Palynology, pp.1-31. More papers of Dr. Vann Smith More papers Sophie Warny Yours, Paul H.
  4. isurolamna inflata vs affinis

    Hi guys, would anyone know the difference between isurolmna affinis and inflata, i cant seem to find an age gap and physically their features, to me at least, seem very similiar anyway, the reason i am asking as i have read conflicting resources on teeth from unit J of upnor fm (beltinge fish bed) at herne bay, UK that differ between one and the other and im not sure which to go with, thanks for your help
  5. Isle of sheppey bonanza 17/7/20

    Hi guys, today I set out with the goal of finding sharks teeth from bed D of the ypresian London clay formation, Thames group. I hunted at the world famous site at warden point where the London clay occurs both in the cliffs and in the foreshore. it was an absolutely beautiful day 27C, for england that’s tropical At this site shark teeth are found in the gravel banks at the top of the beach and phosphatic modules are found at low tide not shown in these pictures but it stretches out very far ( an estimate would be 200-300metres) pyritized stuff can be found all up and down the beach, it’s is amazingly abundant! we (Me and my dad) arrived as the tide was going out and seeing as it hadn’t gone out quite far enough yet, we ate the sandwiches I made, delicious if I do say so myself. Half an hour later we set out onto the gravel banks to look for teeth, having found nothing But pyrite invertebrates for half an hour we continued around to the bunkers, the mud here was very deep I would say 1ft deep in some places, a bit of a sticky situation anyway here is where I found my 2nd favourite find ( I will be showing my finds once I have cleaned them so the clue I will give is it was what I think is. A zanthopsis dufouri) Rather pleased with myself I kept on hunting the ground uncovered by the retreating tide and found several more phosphatic modules to explore, a fun activity for the summer after 2 hours of looking for these I tired of the mud and I had cut myself on an oyster so we returned to the shingle to look for teeth again. This time I was succesfull finding 2 teeth, (one of which is a rarer species) and more interesting stuff which I will share when I have the opportunity to photograph all of it end photo shows just how muddy i got
  6. Possible Bone Found

    Hey there, This is my first post so please excuse any newbie blunders. I found this bone or other long thing lying on the beach at Tankerton, Kent, UK part of the London Clay formation this week, 14th July 2020. The London Clay formation is said to be early/lower eocene. To me, a layman to palaeontology and Osteology, it seems like a leg bone, perhaps tibia because of it triangular shape at one end?!?! I was told by a young gentleman on the beach that Mammouth have been found there as well in the past. That is about as far as my knowledge goes. I appreciate any help I can get. Thanks
  7. My collection of london clay fossils

    Hi guys i will be showing you my london clay fossil collection over the next few days, i will only be showing the best of the best that i have either found, bought or traded for i will do a location per day, except for sheppey which might take a few days First of all we have butts cliff, burnham on crouch, I spend a while making labels and boxing the nice teeth up
  8. Paleoichthyology,Part one

    Knowing Carnevale's musical predilection,I can pretty much guess the origin of the genus name Bollettino della Società Paleontologica Italiana, 58 (3), 2019, 295-307. Modena ISSN 0375-7633 doi:10.4435/BSPI.2019.18 A dragonet (Teleostei, Callionymoidei) from the Eocene of Monte Bolca, Italy Giorgio Carnevale & Alexandre F. Bannikov CarnevaleBannikov2019-Gilmourella.pdf
  9. Heliobatis radians MARSH, 1877

    From the album Vertebrates

    Heliobatis radians MARSH, 1877 Eocene Ypresian Green River Formation Kemmerer Warfield Quarry Wyoming USA Length 45cm / 18"
  10. Help with ID please!!

    I found this today at Walton-on-the-Naze, UK. It’s pretty small and I’m really struggling with identifying it. Might be something cool but maybe not even a fossil? It was found on the beach and is likely from the London clay (Eocene - Ypresian stage). It’s really common to find plant matter in this, I came away with loads of fossilised wood. So I’m thinking possibly some sort of plant fossil? Maybe a seed or something? Was also thinking it might be a coprolite or something like that but it’s fairly uniform in shape. It’s a little damaged and shows what seems to be clay infilling.
  11. First fossil dragonflies from B.C. identified and named Simon Fraser University, November 04, 2019 http://www.sfu.ca/sfunews/stories/2019/11/first-fossil-dragonflies-from-bc-identified-and-named.html Fifty-million-year-old dragonfly species that once flew in B.C. identified for first time. Identifying dragonflies from fossils involves mapping their distinctive wings and comparing the results to species living today. By Kevin Griffen, Vancouver Sun, November 4, 2019 https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/fifty-million-year-old-dragonfly-species-that-once-flew-in-b-c-identified-for-first-time The open access paper is: Archibald, S.B. and Cannings, R.A., 2019. Fossil dragonflies (Odonata: Anisoptera) from the early Eocene Okanagan Highlands, western North America. The Canadian Entomologist, pp.1-34. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/canadian-entomologist/article/fossil-dragonflies-odonata-anisoptera-from-the-early-eocene-okanagan-highlands-western-north-america/74A59170711807272E35236BA309AC9A Related paper is: Archibald, S.B., Greenwood, D.R., Smith, R.Y., Mathewes, R.W., and Basinger, J.F. 2011a. Great Canadian Lagerstätten 1. Early Eocene Lagerstätten of the Okanagan Highlands (British Columbia and Washington State). Geoscience Canada, 38:155–164. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/262485004_Great_Canadian_Lagerstatten_1_Early_Eocene_Lagerstatten_of_the_Okanagan_Highlands_British_Columbia_and_Washington_State Yours, Paul H.
  12. Thaumaturus intermedius Weitzel 1933

    From the album Vertebrates

    Thaumaturus intermedius Weitzel 1933 Eocene Messel near Darmstadt Germany
  13. Ductor vestenae VOLTA, 1796

    From the album Vertebrates

    Ductor vestenae VOLTA, 1796 Eocene Ypresian Monte Bolca near Verona Italy
  14. Gisortia tuberculosa

    From the album Cuisian

    Taille 11,50 et 10 cm
  15. What urchin ?

    Hi, i found that urchin in an area at the limit between upper ypresian and lutetian, about 52 Million of Years. It is 2,5 cm in lenght, 2 cm wide and about 1 cm in thickness.
  16. Fossil or Rock

    Hi All, I’m very much an amateur and new to this site / forum. This is my first post. Can anyone please help with identification. This object was found in the inter tide mud flat region of East Mersey Island, Essex County, England, UK. Cudmore Grove Park beach location. It appears to have many features resembling bone. There is an inner sponge like area on cross section - possible trabecular structure. The shape has a clear indent groove on the assessed outer surface. My first thoughts were that it could possibly be something like a Patella. Online searching suggests a possible Femur Head part. But then that may be my desire to believe. Can anyone suggest what it may be, and if bone not rock then what could it come from given the location and geology. Many thanks for any anticipated input. Regards, Bob
  17. Hi all, my wife found this impressive vertebra on the beach at Walton-on-the-Naze this morning. Apart from it being from a bony fish, is there any way of narrowing down the species? It is from the London Clay deposits (Ypresian / early Eocene).
  18. Nummulites_perforatus2.JPG

    From the album Pyrenees forams

    Nummulites perforatus, Upper Ypresian (Cuisian) stage, Catalan (SE) Pyrenees
  19. Assilina_exponens3.JPG

    From the album Pyrenees forams

    Assilina exponens, Upper Ypresian (Cuisian) stage, Catalan (SE) Pyrenees
  20. Nummulites_perforatus1.JPG

    From the album Pyrenees forams

    Nummulites perforatus, Upper Ypresian (Cuisian) stage, Catalan (SE) Pyrenees
  21. Assilina_exponens2.JPG

    From the album Pyrenees forams

    Assilina exponens, Upper Ypresian (Cuisian) stage, Catalan (SE) Pyrenees
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