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glacialerratic

Rockport Quarry

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glacialerratic

One of my favorite spots is an old limestone quarry on Rockport Rd., north of Alpena, off 23N, turn right on Rockport Rd., (gravel) parking at the end.

Tons of coral -- lots of rugosa, hex, favosites, and some others. Found a nice slab with a crinoid calyx. A few trilobite frags, brachys, ect. Looks like a high-energy deposition environment.

Some of the coral heads are huge.

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fig rocks

Sounds like fun, you'll have to post some pics. :)

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glacialerratic

Placoderms?

I had no idea. Thanks for the tip!

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Placoderms

Yea, most of the bone I found was towards the ?back? of the quarry (I guess it would be West?). I am no expert, only been there 3 times.

Once you catch the color you can't miss it:

rockport.jpg

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glacialerratic

That's a great find!

I don't recall seeing anything like that, but I do know where you are referring to in the quarry -- that's usually where I head.

Going to have to start looking for blue next time I'm over there.

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art

Is it still open?

May have to go when winter breaks....

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glacialerratic

Yes, it's on state land.

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fossils by great lakes

How common are placoderm fossils there? I have never been to Rockport quarry but I do have fossils from the Belle Shale (near Alpena), they are the usual brachiopods, bryozoa, crinoid bits, and corals. Also, how common are trilobites at Rockport? Thanks

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glacialerratic

The placoderm fossils are in the southern half of the quarry -- look for blue specks on the rock.

There aren't any trilos in the Rockport Quarry limestone. I think the Genshaw formation is in the southern half, which has a few trilos. I've only found pygidiums.

It is a great quarry for corals.

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fossils by great lakes

Hey, I'm back! Going to go up to Alpena in a couple of days. Could some one show me how to get up there from Oakland county? I live near Pontiac. I assume its north of Alpena, but what road is it on? I just got back from Rock glen in Arkona and got some nice mucrospirifer and tentaculites (lil' straight shells). Peace out!

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glacialerratic

fbgl, it's on 23N, about 20 min. north of Alpena. It's a right turn onto Rockport Rd., there's a party store there. Go all the way to the end of the road.

Good luck!

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crinus

Here it is on Google Maps. You can see Rockport Rd and at the end of the road is the abandoned quarry.

Rockport Quarry

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fossils by great lakes

Here it is on Google Maps. You can see Rockport Rd and at the end of the road is the abandoned quarry.

Rockport Quarry

Thanks guys. I looked at the Google maps street view image where Rockport road hits 23 and there's no street sign for rockport road on there. So what do the letters on the party store say so I know where to go? And by the way what formation is it? Thanks :)

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crinus

Thanks guys. I looked at the Google maps street view image where Rockport road hits 23 and there's no street sign for rockport road on there. So what do the letters on the party store say so I know where to go? And by the way what formation is it? Thanks :)

The last time I was there (last year) the street sign was there. It is a very old, rusty, small sign that can easily be missed. Once you are in the Long Lake area keep an eye out at every intersection. Rockport Road is a dirt road so ignore all paved roads. Like Tim said, there is a party store at the intersection. Do you have "Devonian Strats of Alpena and Presque Isle Counties, Michigan." The book has topo maps in the back to help you find the localities and lists over 100 localities in that area. Not all are great and many are old and overgrown, but some of them are quite good.

I believe that the quarry has the following formations. Rockport Quarry limestone, Bell Shale, Genshaw Fm and I do believe that the Ferron Point Formation occurs there also. The Bell shale (good for crinoids) is mostly dump piles along a drainage ditch on the east side of the quarry. Hard to miss as it mostly grey mud these days. Some nice fossils are found in that mud, especially if it has rained and someone else has not beaten you to the spot.

crinus

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fossils by great lakes

Well, I went before the last post, and so I couldn't find the quarry at first :unsure: but then I did at the last minute and got some corals and brachiopods. The Google maps image is deceptive: its a long walk from the pier and dump piles to the actual quarry. I was pleasantly suprised by the pools of water: the fish in them are aquarium size! Will definately go back next year........ :)

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jugglerguy

Hi, I know next to nothing about fossils, but my 13 year old son is interested in rocks, so we've been out looking for some fossils. He's probably more interested in "pretty rocks", but as I've been reading up on rocks, I've discovered that we're in a much more fossil rich area than I realized. We live about 20 minutes from the Rockport quarry. After reading this discussion last night, we took a ride out there after school and walked around for a little over an hour. We picked up several Petoskey stones since we just bought a used rock grinder and have been polishing them.

I'm going to post a few pictures to show the some of the stuff we found. Is there a way to remove fossils from the surrounding rock? My son chipped off some fossils that he calls "bugles". I think they're actually called horn coral. As you can see in the pictures, there's still rock around the fossils. I'd like to see more than just the end.

I realize that most of this stuff is coral, but if there's anything that isn't coral, could you tell me what it is? I'm most interested in what the fish fin shaped thing is that's fairly large compared to the quarter.

post-7558-0-66497300-1323823693_thumb.jpg

post-7558-0-85352300-1323823703_thumb.jpg

post-7558-0-07967800-1323823716_thumb.jpg

post-7558-0-33830700-1323823728_thumb.jpg

post-7558-0-08845000-1323823737_thumb.jpg

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crinus

The first four pictures are all coral. The fin thing is a cross section of a weathered horn coral. I believe that the last pic is a stromatoporid (spelling???).

You are in a very rich area for fossils. There are many more sites all well within 20 miles of the quarry. You need the book on the Alpena area. I will get you a link to a downloadable copy.

crinus

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crinus

If you go to this link you should be able to download a copy. There is a list of about 100+ localities in the area. Many are probably long gone but many are still accessible.

http://deepblue.lib....e/2027.42/48601

crinus

Edited by crinus

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jugglerguy

Thanks for the information, crinus. I'm looking through the book now. I've read other references to the Potter farm. Do you have any idea where that is?

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crinus

The best Potter Farm site is near Evergreen Cemetary in Alpena. There is a radio station on the north/south road west of the cemetary. Can't remember the name of the road. In the lot north of the radio station's property is a road ditch.. It is full of Potter Farm fossils.

I will go to google earth and see if I can find some coordiantes for the site and let you know exactly where it is.

crinus

PS Since you are new to fossils, I guess I should mention that Potter Farm is not a place. It is the name of the rock formation where certain fossils can be found. Just want to make sure you are clear on this as you did mention that you are new to fossils.

Edited by crinus

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crinus

Here is a google maps link that shows the spot. You can even see the ditch on the satelite map. The ditch runs along Burkholder Dr. You can park next to the ditch.

http://maps.google.c...=h&vpsrc=6&z=17

Now let me relay an funny story about this spot. A friend of mine likes to collect blastoids at this spot. Since they are very tiny, he lays on his belly and stares at the ground hoping to find the elusive blastoid. Bagley Rd is a busy road and someone spotted him laying there and not moving. So they called the police to report a body alongside of the road. They showed up with all the light flashing and him wondering what is going on.

crinus

Edited by crinus

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jugglerguy

When I asked about Potter Farm, I thought it was a place. After writing that, I was doing more reading, and I was starting to get the impression that it was a formation. You don't have to worry about offending me. I really am that ignorant!

I know the place you're talking about by the TV station. I live about a mile away. I use the park across the road to launch my kayaks or to ride bikes and unicycles. That's a funny story about your friend! I'll try to look alive as I'm scouring that ditch. There's a guy named paleo Joe who does fossil hunts just south of there next to the credit union in a newer ditch. I've never met Joe, but he has a car painted with dinosaurs that I see parked there once in a while during the summer.

I'll go do some more reading about the Potter Farm formation so I know what to look for and then check that out this weekend.

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dudeman

Nice find jugglerguy! It looks like there is a criniod head on the piece in pic 2, I have been looking at rocks my whole life and I just found my first criniod head this year! Again great score!

post-7322-0-43154300-1323902866_thumb.jpg

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jugglerguy

So you're saying that I've accomplished in an hour what took you a lifetime? I think I should quit while I'm ahead! Any more fossil hunting is only going to lower my rate of crinoid acquisition.

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