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Ramona

Studying 3D structure of fenestella bryzoan

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Ramona

I am trying to wrap my head around what these things looked like in "real life" so I can recognize them better.  This is a limestone rock with what I think are fenestella bryozoan fossils, found in Huntsville, AL.  Mississipian age.  This photo is looking down at what I call the "top" of the rock.  The next photo will be from the side, looking at the same area but from the "inside" of the rock.  Can anyone point me to a site where I might find a diagram of these to better help me understand what they looked like?
 

Thanks!
Ramona

IMG_3515.jpg

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Ramona

This is a close up image of what I call the "inside" of the rock.  The top of the rock is flat but this shows a cut away from the side of the rock - I think it shows the same things from a different perspective?  Would that be correct?  I hope I am making sense here! 

Thanks!
Ramona

IMG_3522.jpg

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grandpa

I love the question, and I love the answers.  I can't wait to see what other responses this post draws. 

 

Sponges, corals and bryozoans are a real challenge to separately distinguish.  Determining the differences in a specific specimen is a real challenge in some cases.  As you study the biology of each very different phylum, you will get even more enthralled.  I myself am still learning and trying to determine how to ID many a challenging individual specimen.

 

Fortunately, your specimen is clearly a bryozoan, but some other examples are less clear.  You have a great "backyard" to find many specimens.  You might want to do some further exploration into the life-forms known as bryozoans, corals, sponges via internet searches, etc.

 

See, I told you that your questions are my questions and that we, and other members learn together from those more informed.:SlapHands:

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FossilNerd
9 hours ago, grandpa said:

Sponges, corals and bryozoans are a real challenge to separately distinguish.

Agreed! I love sponges, corals, and bryozoan, but trying to ID them can drive one mad! Sometimes it is hard just to figure out which one of the three it is, much less narrow it down to genus/species. Even requiring a microscope or sliced section to get any sort of positive ID in some cases. 
 

In the example of fenestrate bryozoan, you will commonly see them referred to as “lace coral” even though they are not coral at all, but bryozoan.  There are examples of things being classified as one and then years later being reclassified as another.


Cheatetids for example...

https://ucmp.berkeley.edu/porifera/chaetetids.html

 

10 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

There were/are many different types of Bryozoan. 

Some were encrusting, and some were free standing.

This is another issue with identification of sponges, coral, bryozoan. Their size and shape can vary widely. Further increasing the frustration. 

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Ramona
19 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

There were/are many different types of Bryozoan. 

Some were encrusting, and some were free standing. 

 

An-archetypal-classification-of-bryozoan-growth-forms-Seven-morphological-forms-are.png           fossil-month-09-2018-Archimedes-in-life-2.jpg        bryozoa-36e0c08f-1821-425d-86e7-ca98a709c3f-resize-750.gif

 

All images found in a Google image search

This is very helpful!  The photo of the fossil is particularly helpful, as it shows the axis and fronds - I am starting to understand more and more!
Thanks!!

 

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Ramona
18 hours ago, grandpa said:

I love the question, and I love the answers.  I can't wait to see what other responses this post draws. 

 

Sponges, corals and bryozoans are a real challenge to separately distinguish.  Determining the differences in a specific specimen is a real challenge in some cases.  As you study the biology of each very different phylum, you will get even more enthralled.  I myself am still learning and trying to determine how to ID many a challenging individual specimen.

 

Fortunately, your specimen is clearly a bryozoan, but some other examples are less clear.  You have a great "backyard" to find many specimens.  You might want to do some further exploration into the life-forms known as bryozoans, corals, sponges via internet searches, etc.

 

See, I told you that your questions are my questions and that we, and other members learn together from those more informed.:SlapHands:

Yes!!  I am glad to help you by asking more questions!  ;-)  I promise more to come!  I am able to devote only a little amount of time each day to this study, so it helps to be able to concentrate in particular areas.  


Thanks so much!

 

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Ramona
8 hours ago, FossilNerd said:

Agreed! I love sponges, corals, and bryozoan, but trying to ID them can drive one mad! Sometimes it is hard just to figure out which one of the three it is, much less narrow it down to genus/species. Even requiring a microscope or sliced section to get any sort of positive ID in some cases. 
 

In the example of fenestrate bryozoan, you will commonly see them referred to as “lace coral” even though they are not coral at all, but bryozoan.  There are examples of things being classified as one and then years later being reclassified as another.


Cheatetids for example...

https://ucmp.berkeley.edu/porifera/chaetetids.html

 

This is another issue with identification of sponges, coral, bryozoan. Their size and shape can vary widely. Further increasing the frustration. 

Fascinating!!  I guess even the experts keep learning, right?  I will keep studying and try to not get overwhelmed, LOL!  One. Rock. At. A. Time. 

Thanks!

 

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Coco

Hi,

 

19 hours ago, Fossildude19 said:

    fossil-month-09-2018-Archimedes-in-life-2.jpg

Are they Archimedes ? Incredible ! I never imagine they were like this with fronds !

 

Thanks for these informations.

 

Coco

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Fossildude19
15 minutes ago, Coco said:

Hi,

Are they Archimedes ? Incredible ! I never imagine they were like this with fronds !

Thanks for these informations.

Coco

Hi Coco!

Yes that is what Archimedes would look like in life. 

Amazing, isn't it.  :) 

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FossilNerd
5 hours ago, Ramona said:

Fascinating!!  I guess even the experts keep learning, right?  I will keep studying and try to not get overwhelmed, LOL!  One. Rock. At. A. Time. 

Thanks!

 

Oh yes! Not that I’m an expert by any means! This hobby is definitely a life long learning experience. Any day I can learn something new is a good day, and most days are good! ;) 

 

One rock at a time is a great motto! I try to take one fossil of mine as often as I can. Sometimes once a week/month, sometimes multiple a week/month and study it. Try to research an ID. Some things I can get down to genus or (rarely) species level. Others I just end up figuring out that it’s a coral and not a bryozoan. Sometimes I get nowhere with an ID. Either way I learn a lot and on occasion I get to update my database with (hopefully) more accurate data. :) 

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