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JohnBrewer

Painting epoxy putty

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JohnBrewer

Hi guys, I’m rebuilding some matrix on an ichthyosaur block I've recently acquired. What paint type do you use for colour matching?

 

ta

 

John

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ParkerPaleo

I have been using acrylics.  Specifically the brand Ceramcoat by Delta Creative.  Some of the other acrylic brands don't seem to adhere well.

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Welsh Wizard
19 hours ago, JohnBrewer said:

Hi guys, I’m rebuilding some matrix on an ichthyosaur block I've recently acquired. What paint type do you use for colour matching?

 

ta

 

John

 

Hi John

 

i was going to ask a similar question so I’m interested in how you get on

 

Nick

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JohnBrewer
4 hours ago, Welsh Wizard said:

 

Hi John

 

i was going to ask a similar question so I’m interested in how you get on

 

Nick

What colour are you looking at, Nick @Welsh Wizard? I’m looking at typical Dorset coast warm grey. I can see mixing is gonna be a real pain :/ 

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Bobby Rico

Systems 3 acrylic paint I would think would work well . Available in small tubes  and mixes well. I think I would use some dry brush technique to build up the colour . @Ludwigia and @Peat Burns both do great colour matching  and paint work, maybe will have some advice.

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Ludwigia

I use water-soluble acrylic colours, then usually cover it with Rember beeswax finish to fix it. I don't brush the Rember on, but rather let it run over the spots I've colored and let it set.

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Welsh Wizard

Hi John @JohnBrewer

 

Im going to do this spine - it’s mottled yellowy brown. Only the front and leave the back grey and then build a stand. Spine alone is 13 inches long

 

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RJB

  @JohnBrewer, Hi John, and dont forget that in a couple more years we are going to be like this,, (right hand raised with fingers crossed), best of buddies.  :)  Sorry, cant help joking around.   But I too use acrylics.  I decide on what colors im going to use and put a little bit of each onto a small plastic bag and also put on some drops of water.  With whatever size of brush im going to use I start mixing colors along with a tiny bit of water to make mixing easier until I get what im after.  Doesnt always work so sometimes I will do a test on something else and see if its going to work or not.  Good luck my freind.

 

RB

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RJB
1 hour ago, Peat Burns said:

One thing I've learned about color matching is: don't think too hard.  What I mean is that what you think is standard gray or brown on the fossil, might require mixing-in green, blue, orange, and / or red to get a good match.  You just have to mix and mix and mix in small quantities until you get it right.

  A really good tip here!!! 

 

RB

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Ptychodus04

I agree with @Peat Burns I’ve had to add green and yellow more often than not.

 

I also use acrylics for my restorations. The cleanup is too easy to use anything else. Also, in order to keep from getting an overly unnatural look, I like to water my paints down after the initial coat in order to get some transparency. I will also use a sponge to give anmottled look to the repair because even the most monochromatic fossils have some color variations.

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Ludwigia

Sometimes I also brush on some stonemeal from the appropriate matrix before the epoxy kitt is dry. Then after it's hardened I scrub off the excess with a toothbrush before I start painting.

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Bob Saunders

I can only add as I do Acrylic paints on canvas boards or wood carvings. I use tubes of Winsor & Newton. Sometimes white or black Gesso. Many inexpensive brands is more filler and less pigment. Usually apply and  mix on special paper on a damp sponge to help keep it from drying to fast. Sometimes $10-$40 + brushes, and yes it is worth it. Interesting topic as I advance into collecting. 

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JohnBrewer

Thanks all for your insights. Will post when done. Fortunately texture isn’t an issue as the matrix is smooth as a baby’s....

 

John

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