Jump to content

A Few New Brunswick Tetrapod Footprints


FossilsNS

Recommended Posts

Hello all,

 

Here are a few images of some tetrapod footprints my good friend and I collected over the past several years. These fossils were accessioned into the New Brunswick Museum geology/paleontology collection and are currently under study. It is illegal to collect fossils in New Brunswick, however the Museum was very happy that we brought the footprints to their attention and were keen on including us in all the research. We have been working with Matt Stimson, a local (and very knowledgeable) paleontologist, and Olivia King, and have since found MANY more tracks. We are actively writing these specimens up and should have a few publications coming out in upcoming years. There will be much, much more from this site so stay tuned.

 

rsz_1img_8341a.jpg.f63030f19cc8c5277d23bc29f7e2e19e.jpgrsz_img_8381a.jpg.8d08eb9dc4fa372e74a81af6be1bc4be.jpgrsz_img_8418a.jpg.2f3d6b06a054fe949cdcdbf73608c8af.jpgrsz_img_8457a.jpg.d9094ed426b721bef7d20c458c4d7f2a.jpg

 

FossilsNS

  • I found this Informative 9
Link to post
Share on other sites

Forgot mention, these prints have all been preliminarily identified as Limnopus (pic #2 is questionable though) and are Carboniferous in age.

  • I found this Informative 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

Very Cool!

Matt is a member here, (although sadly, is not as active on the Forum as he was a few years ago. ) and we enjoy his input when he does get a chance to chime in here. 

He is very knowledgeable, and kind as well. 


I'm glad you are getting a chance to do the science and research along with the pros. :) 

Sounds like a good time!  :envy:

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
On 11/28/2019 at 2:36 PM, FossilsNS said:

Hello all,

 

Here are a few images of some tetrapod footprints my good friend and I collected over the past several years. These fossils were accessioned into the New Brunswick Museum geology/paleontology collection and are currently under study. It is illegal to collect fossils in New Brunswick, however the Museum was very happy that we brought the footprints to their attention and were keen on including us in all the research. We have been working with Matt Stimson, a local (and very knowledgeable) paleontologist, and Olivia King, and have since found MANY more tracks. We are actively writing these specimens up and should have a few publications coming out in upcoming years. There will be much, much more from this site so stay tuned.

 

rsz_1img_8341a.jpg.f63030f19cc8c5277d23bc29f7e2e19e.jpgrsz_img_8418a.jpg.2f3d6b06a054fe949cdcdbf73608c8af.jpgrsz_img_8457a.jpg.d9094ed426b721bef7d20c458c4d7f2a.jpg

rsz_img_8381a.jpg.8d08eb9dc4fa372e74a81af6be1bc4be.jpg

 

FossilsNS

It's illegal to collect fossils in NB? How extraordinary! And disappointing.

I moved back to my home province of NB in 2005 and found regulations tying up everything from haircuts to
trout fishing to transferring a driver's license to taking a book from the library. I'll google the fossil issue and 
won't be at all surprised to find evidence that this is true.

 

Thanks for wonderful post on the fossil prints!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello markjw,

 

I very glad you liked my post, and I can see why your surprised!

Unfortunately all the maritime provinces have this law, but it is only put in

place to protect the fossils and their scientific significance. Basically to stop people

from mining fossils ( that may be important) and going off to sell them or keep them in private collections.

In their eyes, fossils are part of the provinces heritage and should be kept in a museum where they can be preserved like any other artifact.

I can only speak for New Brunswick when I say this, but the museum is very eager to work with you,

(if its an important find), and will most likely not take an "average fossil" or one they already have many of.

You could say they have a laid back approach.

 

Anyway,

Just keep this in mind when your fossil hunting...as there is no rule to say you cant do that!

 

FossilsNS

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

So you can still collect in NB and the museum will let you keep any finds that they don't consider significant? That's better than the impression I've been getting...

Great track fossils.... I'm in Cretaceous strata over here and I've never found any vertebrate prints. (I don't think anyone has ever found vertebrate tracks on this island and if they did, they would be considered significant)

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wrangellian,

 

Keep looking! You never know, that next rock you flip over just might have a vert track on it! If that ever happens, please let me know. I would love to hear about it :)

 

FossilsNS

Link to post
Share on other sites

Will do! But the options are dwindling, not expanding. One of the local sites a stone's throw from my place that showed promise (though I never saw anything other than ripple marks and worm tracks in what was exposed) was covered over with gravel by the muni because of the angle of the layers and the risk of falling slabs of rock, I suppose.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Wrangellian said:

Will do! But the options are dwindling, not expanding. One of the local sites a stone's throw from my place that showed promise (though I never saw anything other than ripple marks and worm tracks in what was exposed) was covered over with gravel by the muni because of the angle of the layers and the risk of falling slabs of rock, I suppose.

That's very unfortunate. Wave ripples and burrows are definitely good indicators, at least in the Carboniferous rocks I've been dealing with.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, most of the local rock here is deeper water, but in some places you see tidal facies. And we now know there were dinosaurs on this coast, so they must have left tracks somewhere!

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Wrangellian said:

Yes, most of the local rock here is deeper water, but in some places you see tidal facies. And we now know there were dinosaurs on this coast, so they must have left tracks somewhere!

I like the way you think. Good luck!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I need to think optimistically even if I don't normally.. ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...
mstimson29
On 28/11/2019 at 9:24 PM, Fossildude19 said:

Very Cool!

Matt is a member here, (although sadly, is not as active on the Forum as he was a few years ago. ) and we enjoy his input when he does get a chance to chime in here. 

He is very knowledgeable, and kind as well. 


I'm glad you are getting a chance to do the science and research along with the pros. :) 

Sounds like a good time!  :envy:

Kind words old forum friend. Thank you for that. I see you've met my new apprentice :) I often wonder who I teaching who however. :)

 

 

  • I found this Informative 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
mstimson29
On 09/01/2020 at 5:22 AM, Wrangellian said:

So you can still collect in NB and the museum will let you keep any finds that they don't consider significant? That's better than the impression I've been getting...

Great track fossils.... I'm in Cretaceous strata over here and I've never found any vertebrate prints. (I don't think anyone has ever found vertebrate tracks on this island and if they did, they would be considered significant)

Wrangellian.  Indeed all fossils in NB are protected by law. However there is a duty to report fossil finds to the provincial museum. Once a fossil is removed from its context it loses most of its scientific value. Paleontology is not like stamp collecting anymore. It's looking at biodiversity and populations in an paleoecosystem. Thus even common fossils are.important for understanding the role they played in ancient environments. BUT there are not many professionals so we rely on local new Brunswickers to explore and discover new and cool fossils.  FOSSILSNS is quite right. We want to work with locals to help us monitor and bring important fossils to the scientific world. FOSSILSNS is coauthoring papers with me another others now. 

 

Perhaps we can get you an amateur permit.  :)

  • I found this Informative 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19
47 minutes ago, mstimson29 said:

Kind words old forum friend. Thank you for that. I see you've met my new apprentice :) I often wonder who I teaching who however. :)

 

 

Good to see you on here, Matt.  

:D

Always a pleasure to read your input here.

Glad to see you recruiting more fossil fans to bring you more science. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Wrangellian
7 hours ago, mstimson29 said:

Wrangellian.  Indeed all fossils in NB are protected by law. However there is a duty to report fossil finds to the provincial museum. Once a fossil is removed from its context it loses most of its scientific value. Paleontology is not like stamp collecting anymore. It's looking at biodiversity and populations in an paleoecosystem. Thus even common fossils are.important for understanding the role they played in ancient environments. BUT there are not many professionals so we rely on local new Brunswickers to explore and discover new and cool fossils.  FOSSILSNS is quite right. We want to work with locals to help us monitor and bring important fossils to the scientific world. FOSSILSNS is coauthoring papers with me another others now. 

 

Perhaps we can get you an amateur permit.  :)

I'm aware of these things. I'll just say that I'm in favour of any system (for any jurisdiction) that maximizes the number of fossils that are reported to the experts/museums and made accessible to science, while at the same time reducing as much as practicable the number of fossils (surface finds) that are lost to erosion, whether that means being conserved in institutions or private collections.

Not that I'll ever get over there to take advantage, but what does an amateur permit allow you to do - what is involved in that?

Link to post
Share on other sites

An interesting model is "Portable Antiquities Scheme" in Britain. It relates to ancient coins and artefacts. The incentive system is quite good (I think!)...makes it advantageous for people to find stuff and leave it in situ for the experts. Most goes to the finder, but if it is important the finder gets compensated and the find goes into public collection and online for public access. (every little ancient coin...mountains of them!).

 

Also well known, and, I presume, predictable. They have an agreed upon formula of what falls outside the net and what is, alternately, treasure or a 'hoard'. 

More difficult for fossils. (Ontario sounds terrible for artefacts, but good for fossils and maybe geological samples) A few rich areas have policies like "no digging, but you can keep one of each of 5 fossil types you find on surface". I think you can't remove fossils from provincial parks. I wonder about the experiences of veteran Ontario fossil forum people? (I'm new to the hobby)

 

The museum has a night where you can bring fossils in for identification by experts. The province used to publish guides of bedrock and expected fossils for various types. Apparently some quarries allow clubs to visit with safety gear at intervals and they are given a day to hack fossils out of the rocks. I'd like to hear how that works...sounds cool.

 

I wonder if New Brunswick is restrictive because there are few fossils? Southern Ontario is 'plastered' with them. I live over about the only formation (Queenston) that has none! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...