Jump to content
PointyKnight

Ornithischian Vertebra

Recommended Posts

PointyKnight

Hey everyone,

recently came across this partial vertebra from the Kimmeridge Clay online, apparently collected south of Oxford. It measures 9.5cm x 8.5cm. The seller tentatively identified it as a Stegosaurid based on the internal pattern visible on the polished side, and subsequently assigned it to Dacentrurus, since it's the only Stegosaurid fitting the time and location.

5df415c412013_polished-stegosaur-vertebra-2-495-p.thumb.jpg.f83c5a4b19d7621fb58ccf482028708e.jpg

5df415c5e0a88_polished-stegosaur-vertebra-3-495-p.thumb.jpg.5733c02bb91aab37554f7e2f112ee8f1.jpg

5df415c7eedb4_polished-stegosaur-vertebra-4-495-p.thumb.jpg.4c06442fb8fbcd89585266ac9056f99b.jpg

5df415c184345_polished-stegosaur-vertebra-5-495-p.thumb.jpg.af2b0e0c5b3a09bc8774928886cd882b.jpg

I tried to find more information on these supposed patterns indicative of Stegosaurs without much success, so I'd like to ask:

› Is the vertebra actually identifiable on a family level?

› If so, what are the defining characteristics and where could I read up about them?

 

Thanks for your help!

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
dinosaur man

No you can’t tell it’s a vertebrae, and it would only be identifiable if it was a full complete vertebrae. So definitely no identify it to a genus or species level sorry. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
fossil_sea_urchin

If it's from Abingdon then I would find it hugely more likely to be from a large marine reptile. Not long ago I brought a "Duriatitan" vertebra from there for a big price tag, only to find out it was a much cheaper pliosaur vertebra. Some sellers are selling items under an impressive price tag and as dinosaur man said, they are not identifiable. The reason these scams will not stop is because unfortunate dealers end up with these specimens and in order not to lose money they have to sell them of under and equally impressive name and an equally large price tag.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Troodon

Agree mostly marine deposit although Dino material has been found.   You should speak to the seller to find out what science he has that enables him to determine a species from a polished bone pattern.  That would be news worthy. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PointyKnight

Quick follow-up on this:

 

@Troodon He actually never identified it on a species level; he just determined through supposed similarities to other vertebrae that it was a Stegosaurid, Dacentrurus armatus being the only thyreophoran from that formation.

 

And @fossil_sea_urchin it is indeed from Abingdon. To be sure, I talked to Kenneth Carpenter from Utah State University. He was very helpful and confirmed that, exactly as you said, all supposed dinosaur remains from the Kimmeridge Clay on the site were actually plesiosaurs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×