Jump to content

Associated Cretoxyrhina (vraconensis) dentition


Recommended Posts

Hi,

 

Recently, I had the good fortune to acquire this set of Cretoxyrhina (vraconensis) teeth from the Britton Fm., Texas. I have a detailed account of it’s discovery which describes almost all of these teeth being found together in an area about 18” x18”, with a few stragglers found just outside the main pile of teeth. It’s not complete, but It looks like most of the positions are represented. Some of the larger anteriors were not recovered and I suspect at least one or two positions are missing.

 

I have arranged these teeth into positions that look close to me, but there is no doubt that it needs to be adjusted. I am hoping someone here might know something about these early Cretoxyrhina dentitions and might be able to advise or comment on how I can make this accurate.


Some other noteworthy finds recovered from the same 18” square were 2 suspected Cretoxyrhina vertebrae, 5 small Squalicorax (falcatus) teeth, a possible Archeolamna tooth, another very small unidentified cusped shark tooth, and some small fish vertebrae and bones.

 

Thanks for looking.

 

R~

3DAC5428-FF1A-44DC-B269-4F47DFCAA7DF.jpeg

  • I found this Informative 6
Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't help you with the arrangement of the teeth but it is very interesting to see this set of associated teeth. Thanks for sharing this Russ!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Might be able to post more detailed comments later, but both left and right lower lateral files look wrong - some are anteriors from juvenile/sub-adult Cretoxyrhina and some are Odontaspididae indet. (Eostriatolamia sp. likely, it’s Upper Albian right?).

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Anomotodon said:

Might be able to post more detailed comments later, but both left and right lower lateral files look wrong - some are anteriors from juvenile/sub-adult Cretoxyrhina and some are Odontaspididae indet. (Eostriatolamia sp. likely, it’s Upper Albian right?).


thanks for the comment, I would love to hear a more detailed comment if you find the time.

 

I don’t think there are any Odontapsid teeth in this lot, but there are a couple of suspect teeth that may not belong. The lower laterals you mention look like Cretoxyrhina to me, with the broad dental bands. 
 

Ive included some photos zoomed in a bit more.

03477D2C-9D97-4244-8130-C2CEF3FDEEFF.jpeg

46D358F0-5E86-45E5-93AB-36419FCB4B15.jpeg

27B27D75-D409-4DFF-A962-F31994330A73.jpeg

018A9A1F-4973-4692-AE87-776280026B59.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites
britishcanuk

This is where I’m at so far. It undoubtedly needs more work, but I don’t think it’s too terribly far off.

26C19BFF-0804-4A1C-91E1-A166B075D258.jpeg

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 months later...
On 12/26/2019 at 9:44 AM, britishcanuk said:

Hi,

 

Recently, I had the good fortune to acquire this set of Cretoxyrhina (vraconensis) teeth from the Britton Fm., Texas. I have a detailed account of it’s discovery which describes almost all of these teeth being found together in an area about 18” x18”, with a few stragglers found just outside the main pile of teeth. It’s not complete, but It looks like most of the positions are represented. Some of the larger anteriors were not recovered and I suspect at least one or two positions are missing.

 

I have arranged these teeth into positions that look close to me, but there is no doubt that it needs to be adjusted. I am hoping someone here might know something about these early Cretoxyrhina dentitions and might be able to advise or comment on how I can make this accurate.


Some other noteworthy finds recovered from the same 18” square were 2 suspected Cretoxyrhina vertebrae, 5 small Squalicorax (falcatus) teeth, a possible Archeolamna tooth, another very small unidentified cusped shark tooth, and some small fish vertebrae and bones.

 

Thanks for looking.

 

R~

3DAC5428-FF1A-44DC-B269-4F47DFCAA7DF.jpeg

 

That's not a Cretoxyrhina vraconensis but most likely a Cretoxyrhina agassizensis. The latter ranges from the upper middle Cenomanian to the middle Turonian and is characterized by incomplete cutting edges on the anterior teeth of juvenile individuals.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...