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Probably not an old bone!


Elcapitangas

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Hi

 

1st time poster so please go easy on me.  I’m almost certain this will be a modern bone but if anybody can tell from the photos I’d be interested to find out.

 

I picked this up off a beach in North Wales, UK where there is a petrified forest and peat beds where clove hoof prints have been found.  It was not submerged at all.

 

The tape measure shows cm & inches.

 

I’m sure it will just be a cow or sheep but you never know...

 

Thanks in advance

Steve

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FD4A2601-2218-47BA-94D5-C5204F15228B.jpeg

878C2FBB-A156-4D4C-AC3F-C3630564C2BB.jpeg

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Hello and welcome to the forum! 
 

It’s definitely bone, but I don’t believe it is fossilized. Looks to be modern as you guessed. A few quick things to check. Does it feel heavy for the size? Usually fossilized bone is heavier. You could also try what is called the burn test. Hold a lighter to a spot and see if it gives off a smell. Organic material (i.e.modern bone) would give off a distinctive smell. 


I can’t help you with the ID, but I’m sure someone who can will be along shortly. :) 

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Hi 

 

Thanks for the quick response.  If it is old

 it would have been under peat so won’t have fossilised anyway but would have been preserved. At the same spot a full set of deer antlers were found in excellent condition.

 

regards

Steve 

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5 minutes ago, Elcapitangas said:

Hi 

 

Thanks for the quick response.  If it is old

 it would have been under peat so won’t have fossilised anyway but would have been preserved. At the same spot a full set of deer antlers were found in excellent condition.

 

regards

Steve 

Oh I see. Sorry for my confusion. Hopefully someone will be able to ID it and eliminate or confirm your cow/sheep theory. ;) 

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It's the epistropheus of a ruminant, from the photo it seems it comes from a sheep. anyway it doesn't seems fossilized

 

 

Cattura.JPG

Edited by Kiros
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55 minutes ago, Kiros said:

It's the epistropheus of a ruminant, from the photo it seems it comes from a sheep. anyway it doesn't seems fossilized

 

 

 

 "epistopheus"...?  I had never heard this word.  Now I know.  I agree with your ID. 

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12 minutes ago, jpc said:

 "epistopheus"...?  I had never heard this word.  Now I know.  I agree with your ID. 

ahaha I know, it's a strange word but in italian it's "epistrofeo" that translated becomes ephistropheus. maybe there is a easier word for it. anyway it is the second cervical vertebra aftrer the atlas

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1 hour ago, Kiros said:

ahaha I know, it's a strange word but in italian it's "epistrofeo" that translated becomes ephistropheus. maybe there is a easier word for it. anyway it is the second cervical vertebra aftrer the atlas

I'd never heard that term either.  My professors always said 'axis'.  Learned something new today!

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18 minutes ago, ParkerPaleo said:

I'd never heard that term either.  My professors always said 'axis'.  Learned something new today!

Well axis is definitely easier to say :heartylaugh:

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I have also always called it the axis.  Maybe axis is American and epistopheus is British?  

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7 hours ago, jpc said:

I have also always called it the axis.  Maybe axis is American and epistopheus is British?  

Mm I think ephistropheus is the Latin word, like the name of a genus or specie

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Mark Kmiecik
On 12/30/2019 at 11:04 AM, Kiros said:

ahaha I know, it's a strange word but in italian it's "epistrofeo" that translated becomes ephistropheus. maybe there is a easier word for it. anyway it is the second cervical vertebra aftrer the atlas

Epistrofeo translated to English is "axis".

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