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First for my collection


Shellseeker

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Found this a couple of days back... how hard could it be to identify? A lower predator mandible with 1 complete carnassial and two half teeth, vertically split. How many small predators existed in the Florida fossil record? Look at the m1. That is different from both the canid (fox, coyote) m1 and felis (margay, bobcat) m1 you can find on TFF ID threads.  So I checked out raccoon and possum  ... nope!!  Then I started looking at research papers comparing different type of predator m1s.  I was always looking for the smaller predators.

Then I stumbled on an old TFF thread,

http://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/78879-mammal-tooth/

and once again @Harry Pristis makes an ID.  His photo pictures across the internet are an invaluable resource to the Florida Fossil Hunter.  Most TFF members, except Harry, will need to go to the thread above to find the ID.  This is the very first fossil I have from this animal:megdance:,  and I am very pleased to add to the collection.

RtMandible_m1_p3p4B_Text.jpg.329692d19a838c8b4aed8eb1846099b4.jpgRtMandible_m1_p3p4B.JPG.f6139ae21c7d4a90daf481f391101473.JPG

 

I have always had a curious mind.  No surprise that I have questions:

1) What is going on in that 1st photo?  Is this some creature like the worm bore that carries a little chain saw, and slices off half of the p3, half of the p4, and leaves a demarcation line down the side of the m1? Exactly at the halfway point of all 3 teeth. Sometimes I feel paranoiac..:shakehead:

2) More specifically, for those that have one of these in their collections, large, medium, small example?

3) Is  there one specific animal in the Florida fossil record or a couple of options.  So far I have seen at least one latin name and imagine there are others.

 

Thanks for the good wishes , any and all comments.    Jack

 

.cc @jcbshark

 

  • I found this Informative 6
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That is a very nice find.... I agree with your agreement with harry

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Congrats. You Florida Miocene and Pleistocene guys sure are sharp detectives!

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Excellent find and detective work Jack. Always nice to add something new to the collection :D 

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  Good goin Jack.  Always nice to be able to add to the collection.

 

RB

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10 hours ago, Shellseeker said:

1) What is going on in that 1st photo?  Is this some creature like the worm bore that carries a little chain saw, and slices off half of the p3, half of the p4, and leaves a demarcation line down the side of the m1? Exactly at the halfway point of all 3 teeth. Sometimes I feel paranoiac..:shakehead:

2) More specifically, for those that have one of these in their collections, large, medium, small example?

3) Is  there one specific animal in the Florida fossil record or a couple of options.  So far I have seen at least one latin name and imagine there are others.

 

Having searched the net, I do not think that I can get an answer to #1...

2) At 50 mm for this fossil and 14.3 mm for the m1, this is actually a relatively large example. There are various examples of sold mandibles in the $50-$100 range. I believe that I'll keep it...

 

3)Species: Lutra canadensis, Age: Pleistocene 

Location: South West Florida
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Update:

Any time I have an unusual find,  I send it to Richard Hulbert, Curator_Director of the Vertebrate Research Lab at the University of Florida, Gainesville. Richard authorizes the Florida Fossil Hunting permit processes and is the contact point for Florida fossil Identification Service. He is a fantastic resource and I am thankful for his expertise. 

His comments on this find.

Quote

This jaw appears to be from an individual about the same size as the modern species of river otter, Lontra canadensis. The fossil record of this genus extends back to the late Blancan, although could be different at the species level.

This specimen experienced severe weathering after the animal died and prior to its being buried in sediment. Exposure to sun and alternating wetting and drying led to cracks forming in both the bone and teeth. This resulted in the unusually broken pattern for the teeth. You are just lucky that so much remains, as not much more damage would have resulted in a tooth-less specimen.

Richard

 

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Great find. Definitely a keeper if Hurlburt doesn't want it. 

Finding a jawbone with intact dentititon is always a thrill, even if it's a partial.

 

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