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Python0868

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Python0868

Some family members have found what looks like some sort of dinosaur skin fossils. If anyone knows for sure that it is dinosaur skin please let me know. Also, if it is, let me know what dinosaur would it have been from. Found in a creek bed in northern Alabama.

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Al Dente

It might be a stromatoporoid. A Paleozoic sponge-like organism.

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Troodon

Just fyi dinosaurs can be found in the colored area 

Screenshot_20200106-165536_Chrome.thumb.jpg.c2ad2efe0194e61ac3deefced25fa168.jpg

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Tidgy's Dad

Hello, and a very warm welcome to TFF from Morocco.:)

+ 1 for stromatoporoid, could possibly be a coral. 

Nice find. 

 

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Python0868
29 minutes ago, Al Dente said:

It might be a stromatoporoid. A Paleozoic sponge-like organism.

We aren't really sure. These rocks are about 30 inches edge to edge. We found some photos that look a lot like these and came up with Saurolophus. Do you think that is possible? 

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Python0868
15 minutes ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

Hello, and a very warm welcome to TFF from Morocco.:)

+ 1 for stromatoporoid, could possibly be a coral. 

Nice find. 

 

Thank you. We will look into that possibility also. Thank you.

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FossilNerd

Hello and welcome! :) 

 

From the pics it does look like a stromatoporoid or possibly a bryozoan to me. The bumps are common characteristics of stroms and some bryozoan, such as (Heterotrypa sp.), also have bumps like these. 
 

Is the side exposed? Can you see layering? Many thin layers would lean me more towards Stromatoporoid. 
 

If you can see many small holes all over the surface (possibly under magnification) it might be bryozoan zooids.

 

In this case, I’m thinking Stromatoporoid, as I think I can see evidence of openings on the top of some of the mamelons (bumps) called astrorhizea.

 

Anyway... Not dinosaur skin, but a neat find non the less! :) 

 

 

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FossilNerd

Another quick note...

 

If you found this in northern Alabama you were likely in rock from the Paleozoic, which would rule out dinosaurs as it is older. As Troodon pointed out, dinosaurs would be more likely found in mid to southern Alabama.
 

This is a very generic geological map of Alabama, but you get the idea...


8F28ADD4-DB1F-45BC-8B9B-AB87A93DB2C4.thumb.jpeg.11bd2572be8689b396ae2e03aae362a1.jpeg

 

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Python0868

I'm replying to both comments here. I will have to go back and look closer and get more pics to share of side view. I haven't looked at it that closely. The 2 pieces are in my mother-in-law's flower bed as decoration. 

On this I think I see what's going on with the map. So, did the ice age dig up and push younger fossils south of Birmingham? That's just the way it looks to me by the dates and what could be found. 

And thank you for the information.

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Python0868

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Ramona

I live in Huntsville and have recently moved into a house where I am finding tons of bryozoan fossils in the yard.  I have never seen anything like this, but I have only started looking!  Do you know where they found this?  


Welcome to the group!
Ramona

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Ludwigia
On 7.1.2020 at 4:14 AM, Python0868 said:

  So, did the ice age dig up and push younger fossils south of Birmingham?

The glaciers never made it as far south as Alabama.

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Python0868

Ok. By the looks of that map, it just seems like something had moved the dinosaur fossils south and in pretty much a solid line. Unless, the time period that the dinosaurs were here, that would have been the coast line of the internal continental sea. Does anyone know if that is the case?

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Python0868
28 minutes ago, Ramona said:

I live in Huntsville and have recently moved into a house where I am finding tons of bryozoan fossils in the yard.  I have never seen anything like this, but I have only started looking!  Do you know where they found this?  


Welcome to the group!
Ramona

Do those fossils look cylindrical with a hole in the center? If so, an ex co-worker found tons of them in the yard at the plant also. He mentioned that natives used them for beadwork in necklaces and things. But, if you can, please share a photo of your find here.

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Ramona
10 minutes ago, Python0868 said:

Do those fossils look cylindrical with a hole in the center? If so, an ex co-worker found tons of them in the yard at the plant also. He mentioned that natives used them for beadwork in necklaces and things. But, if you can, please share a photo of your find here.

No, I think you are talking about crinoids.  I just made a post called "Cleaning Fossiliferous Limestone" and I have about 8 photos there, so go on over and check them out! ;-)

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Ramona

Here is a link to the post I made: 

 

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Python0868
19 minutes ago, Ramona said:

No, I think you are talking about crinoids.  I just made a post called "Cleaning Fossiliferous Limestone" and I have about 8 photos there, so go on over and check them out! ;-)

Ok. I'll check it out. And yes it is crinoid ossicle.

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Mahnmut

Hi Python,

that line you see on the maps (where the dinosaur fossils are plausible) is just the region where the layers from dinosaur time are on the surface. Imagine a layered cake cut diagonally, thats more or less how the sediments from different times come to the surface in diferent places.

To the north, more has been cut away, so that deeper, older layers are on the surface.

further south more layers from younger times are still on top of the dinosaurs.

Nice fossil anyway, and most probably way older than the dinosaurs!

best Regards,

J

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Python0868

Thanks and yes I understand the layers. You're right, these are way older than dinosaurs by 10 times probably.

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