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Paleoworld-101

Hi everyone, I found this ammonite recently on the beach between Lyme Regis and Charmouth in England and was hoping someone might be able to tell me what species or genus this is? It is from the Charmouth Mudstone Formation, and is about 190 million years old. If additional photos are required i can get more. 

The diameter of the ammonite is approx. 6 cm. Thank you!

IMG_2439.JPG

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Age means it's Ammotida, can't help much after that.

 

I was at Lyme Regis recently and didn't find much, could you give me any tips on how to better myself?

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Paleoworld-101
58 minutes ago, KingSepron said:

Age means it's Ammotida, can't help much after that.

 

I was at Lyme Regis recently and didn't find much, could you give me any tips on how to better myself?

My best advice is to keep looking, it sounds obvious but the more time you spend out there searching, the more you're going to find. Luck is a big part of it and you can easily boost your chances a lot just by being out there as long as possible. It also depends what you're trying to find (i.e. for marine reptile bones you should be examining the shingle closely, but for calcite ammonites you should be finding the right rocks to split). I myself am mainly a marine reptile bone hunter, so i spent almost my whole time searching the loose shingle and was quite successful. 

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Any chance of prepping that out a bit more? Do you know exactly which zone it's from? Could be an Echioceras.

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16 hours ago, KingSepron said:

tips on how to better

 

15 hours ago, Paleoworld-101 said:

being out there as long as possible

Exactly. Being longer, being during a low water level, being the 1st in spring/morning/after a storm.

As to reptile bones, they have a distinct structure/colour pattern, so with experience you start to notice them from afar

Btw with all those concretions you'd better take a hammer and a chisel with you

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Looks like Pleuroceras hawskerense. 

pleuoceras.JPG

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This ammonite species is actually an arnioceras semicostoides  from the semicostatum zone, lower lias, lower jurassic.

these genera are more commonly better preserved on the North Yorkshire coast nr hull, england. But well calcified examples can also be found on Monmouth beach and charmouth beach nr Lyme Regis Dorset england.
 

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Paleoworld-101

Thanks for the replies everyone, although different taxa are being suggested by different people and i'm left not knowing who to believe lol!

 

On 08/01/2020 at 9:09 PM, Ludwigia said:

Any chance of prepping that out a bit more? Do you know exactly which zone it's from? Could be an Echioceras.

I have given this specimen to a good friend of mine so it won't be prepped, nor do i know exactly which horizon/zone it comes from as it was picked up ex-situ on the beach, but it was about halfway between Charmouth and Lyme Regis, so it is presumably from the Black Ven Marls or the Shales with Beef. 

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23 minutes ago, Paleoworld-101 said:

Thanks for the replies everyone, although different taxa are being suggested by different people and i'm left not knowing who to believe lol!

 

I have given this specimen to a good friend of mine so it won't be prepped, nor do i know exactly which horizon/zone it comes from as it was picked up ex-situ on the beach, but it was about halfway between Charmouth and Lyme Regis, so it is presumably from the Black Ven Marls or the Shales with Beef. 

If that's the case, then it can't be a Pleuroceras. I think that Byron (fossils-uk) just hit the nail on the head. If anyone should know, then he would.

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Paleoworld-101
12 minutes ago, Ludwigia said:

If that's the case, then it can't be a Pleuroceras. I think that Byron (fossils-uk) just hit the nail on the head. If anyone should know, then he would.

Excellent, thanks Byron and Ludwigia! My copy of "British Mesozoic Fossils" by the Natural History Museum and most other sources i can find lists the species as A. semicostatum rather than A. semicostoides so i will go with the former. 

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