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Paleoworld-101

A recent find from the stretch of beach between Chilton Chine and Grange Chine on the Isle of Wight, England. It is from the Wessex Formation, about 130 million years old (Early Cretaceous). The bone is quite rolled by the sea but there are still some features remaining and so i was hoping it could still be identified, at least perhaps the type of bone that it is (either the end of some kind of long bone or a metapodial. Length= 4.4 cm; width= 3.8 cm; height= 1.9 cm). I was leaning towards a proximal radius or metatarsal but i would like a second opinion. The shape of the shaft cross section, in the fifth photo, is roughly triangular (where the bone would continue). The most common dinosaurs from this deposit are ornithopods such as Iguanodon and Hypsilophodon, so these would provide the best comparison. Thanks all!

 

 

 

5e1af4ea6d943_LongBone-2.thumb.JPG.675edcc2ead1c16cf6a2cfc9c2c2ed4d.JPG

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5e1af49b52702_LongBone-5.thumb.JPG.b33da2efdc77ba53ef7e30f5f32433f2.JPG

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5e1af5021842a_Longbone-1.thumb.JPG.58d3547324437ce7e3c2766ef62ffe9c.JPG

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5e1af4386204e_LongBone-9.thumb.JPG.3daecb064833fcbe585dbf6a9884e40a.JPG

 

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Could be the distal end of a process from a vertebra 

 

See cervical on top of attached illustration 

 

Screenshot_20200112-055149_Chrome.thumb.jpg.a082e7e2e751c325b8c52bab583cfdf5.jpg

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A zygopophysis ? The only dinosaur reference I can pull from a draw and say. . .

Agreed. :)

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If you don't find a answer here, go to Dinosaur farm on the Isle. They are always ready to help.... 

 

Nice find! 

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Paleoworld-101
7 hours ago, Troodon said:

Could be the distal end of a process from a vertebra 

 

See cervical on top of attached illustration 

Thanks for the reply. I'm having a bit of trouble seeing it myself, but maybe! 

The reason i originally thought radius was the way the bone flares out at the end, and also the raised ridge and then slight depression behind it on the 'underside' surface (what i'm calling the underside but may not be, compare with photos 1-4 in my original post) which seems to match with some images i found online, although most i could compare with such as the first image below are hadrosaur radii. But some hadrosaur metatarsals look very comparable as well so i was left unsure (second image below). The deciding factor might be the shape of the cross section. What bones have a roughly triangular cross section? It is hard to tell from any of these images what the cross sections would be. I think i need to get my hand on some Iggy bones! 

 

 

5e1b785572db9_Hadroradius.png.2a6169b241c2fe7712801ff8341a1ed0.png

5e1b78769fc83_Hadrometa.png.f949912112442517a06afc642709c63f.png

 

 

 

1 hour ago, Natalie81 said:

If you don't find a answer here, go to Dinosaur farm on the Isle. They are always ready to help.... 

 

Nice find! 

 

Thanks Natalie, i am not on the Isle anymore to show them in person but i may send an email soon. 

 

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The shafts from those cervical Processes can be triangular and have a flat end like yours. 

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