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Sandy Siltstone Plate


Righteous

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This plate was in with a bunch of other fern fossils I picked up. What all can you tell me you see in it please. 

C8527305-08B8-4309-BCD6-5783D93F8EF4.jpeg

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1 minute ago, Righteous said:

Is the other Fenestellidae and Febestella?

I think it's all archimedes, just broken up. Not sure where the fit in the scheme though.

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The screw-like objects you see are as already said Archimedes sp. Bryozoans which were present in the Carboniferous and Permian periods, they are fenestellids and some of the grid like structures from the bryozoans belonged to them, while others came from another genus, not sure what it is.

The hash plate generally has a lot going on and is a very nice piece.

Below I sketched out what I see on the hash plate,

The blue are all the Archimedes center spirals,

In red is a brachiopod, I would love more pictures to get you an ID.

In green is what may be an ostracod but I am not 100% on that.

The black are some crinoids stems and the circled area in black looks like a calyx that has been broken up, as well as some of the arms.

Knowing the location of where you found it would also be pretty helpful for better IDs

Hope that helps,

Misha

PicsArt_01-13-05.49.56.jpg

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Oops,

I looked at the picture again and I definitely missed some, Archimedes probably a few crinoids too.

I'm sure you can spot them with the piece in hand though

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Try refreshing the page, it should let you post more then.

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I think that the net-like bryozoans are mostly Archimedes fronds, as Rockwood is insinuating.

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9 minutes ago, Wrangellian said:

Try refreshing the page, it should let you post more then.

Says I’m only allowed 3.9 mb. This phone takes huge pictures 

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21 minutes ago, Righteous said:

Says I’m only allowed 3.9 mb. This phone takes huge pictures 

Try cropping the image, that's what I do.

On the other hand there are also apps that reduce image size look up photo compress or lit photo which is what I have used in the past.

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2 minutes ago, Misha said:

Try cropping the image, that's what I do.

On the other hand there are also apps that reduce image size look up photo compress or lit photo which is what I have used in the past.

I can do that don’t know how the quality will be but we’ll see

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7 minutes ago, Misha said:

Can you give us the location?

I’ll have to ask him tomorrow. Everything else came from Alabama but seems like I remember him mentioning Mississippi 

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Scuchertella sp. for the brachiopod, maybe? 

Really nice hash.:)

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9 hours ago, Ludwigia said:

I think that the net-like bryozoans are mostly Archimedes fronds, as Rockwood is insinuating.

The row of tiny crinoid ossicles is indicative of a relatively low energy environment which would favor the association.

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4 hours ago, Rockwood said:

The row of tiny crinoid ossicles is indicative of a relatively low energy environment which would favor the association.

What exactly does low energy environment mean?

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3 minutes ago, Righteous said:

What exactly does low environment mean?

Low energy environment refers to the amount of turbidity / wave action. Simply put, seas that are stormy will be high energy because they churn up the sediment and everything that has been deposited there (assuming the sea bed is near storm wave base). In high energy environments, it is more common to find fossil fragments given that all but the sturdiest dead organisms will be disarticulated by the churning of the water. Low energy environments are far more peaceful, and so complete body fossils may be more common, or certain orientations will remain largely undisturbed.

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those ossicles resemble sea star ossicles, particularly the one misha circled in green, but would defer to the judgement of those more familiar with paleozoic fossils.

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