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Show us your fossils through a macro lens.


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gar tooth, 7mm

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bony fish and shark verts, 3-4mm

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Craspedites sp. ammonite, 15 mm

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belemnite protoconch, 0,25mm

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echinoid test, 8 mm

IMG_20200602_135246.jpg

 

 

All of these come from Tithonian, -150ma, Moscow

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Thecosmilia Trichitoma

The colors on that ammonite are jaw dropping. Beautiful!

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  • 3 weeks later...

Beautiful horn coral from @Monica With a cool flower shaped Bryozoan. Please look at label for details.

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On 06/10/2020 at 8:36 PM, RuMert said:

Craspedites sp. ammonite, 15 mm

Wow love the colour on this ammonites . Nice photos thanks for keeping my thread going 

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I decided to do a little Permian fossil hunt during my lunch break.  I only did a quick unaided eye search of a tablespoon or so of matrix and here is the results.  First is the entire find.  Followed by the largest tooth using my clip on lens.  I know the lighting could have been better but I felt it was going to turn into a journey down the rabbit hole if I didn't keep myself to a set time limit.  Scale in the one picture is inches.

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these were the best picture I could get of this 2 mm pseudo scorpion in amber from Burma or Myanmar. I bought it a while ago and looking at it through a magnifying glass is incredible.83146C63-DFBF-4FC3-BC7D-0B5843AD6B83.thumb.jpeg.f5bf175f328224838222f383f57cdeb9.jpeg087ACEF8-4EB1-48AF-816F-315BE8D92E6F.thumb.jpeg.255b9369df17a463e0ef408f954b182c.jpeg

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Exposure adjusted a bit to bring down the black levels.

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

 

83146C63-DFBF-4FC3-BC7D-0B5843AD6B83.jpeg

 

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Unknown. Wheeler Shale. Conspecific to Elrathia kingii, trying out a macro mode app on iPhone 11. mM scale

9D34525B-F144-4272-847D-EA00C2EABFC4.jpeg

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Thought I would contribute to this topic...

 

Tyrannosaurus rex serrations:

5f9c746ada4b4_IMG_1623copy.thumb.jpeg.1f9a2e3f0eff464ab4024a12d10da29a.jpeg

 

Tylosaurus proriger (large mosasaur) tooth feeding wear:

5f9c746ca6472_IMG_0206copy.thumb.jpeg.22ff0a17179f7a69f92b5e6b8c37f73c.jpeg

 

Ptychodus whipplei ("crusher" shark) tooth feeding wear:

5f9c746d8f8d7_IMG_4150copy.thumb.jpg.bcdd254266c6f8ae2ca6081cbf4665e9.jpg

 

Galeocerdo cuvier (tiger shark) tooth:

5f9c7469bab93_IMG_0227copy.thumb.jpeg.757a8e8645c9e99e72d36772439200ad.jpeg

 

Edmontosaurus annectens (hadrosaur) feeding wear:

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Astraspis desiderata (Ordovician ostracoderm) odontode:

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Mosasaur bone:

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Cretodus crassidens (Cretaceous shark) enamel folds:

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Small Cretaceous shark teeth:

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Ptychotrygon sp. (sawfish) oral teeth:

5f9c75caeaa69_IMG_4913copy.thumb.jpg.062fa27db386b179446505c370f538f5.jpg

 

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fossilsonwheels
On 7/1/2020 at 1:51 AM, Bobby Rico said:

Some very nice Shark Tooth Hill matrix of Bakersfield. 

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Very nice teeth and excellent photography 

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fossilsonwheels

Here are some microfossils as photographed from the microeye at the Gateway Science Museum. These are from the Mesaverde Formation. I can’t recall the exact member of the formation but they are from Colorado. 

 

Scapanorhynchus symphseal tooth. The only Goblin symphseal in our collection. 4mm 

 

Scyliorhinus tooth. This was the smallest tooth we had found until we started poking around Devonian matrix. Just 1mm

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
fossilsonwheels

I haven’t posted any Dino stuff in a long time so I played with the micro eye at work today while doing a Dino video. 

 

Pic 1 Pachycephalosaurus “fang” Hell Creek Formation 

Pic 2 Pectinodon Lance Creek Formation

Pic 3 the serrations on a small Allosaurid tooth from Portugal 

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fossilsonwheels

Here are some cool micro shark teeth from Ringstead Bay, Weymouth United Kingdom.  We have been able to find a fair number of teeth from this well studied Jurassic chondrichthyes assemblage. We have roughly 3/4 of the fauna in our collection. This one site has given us our oldest fossils from 4 extant orders of sharks and our oldest Batoid tooth as well. 

 

Tiny teeth and fun to try photographing lol 

 

Here they are under the microeye

 

Pseudorhina alifera- an early Angelshark. These used to be called Squatina but I believe Pseudorhina is correct based on current literature. Still a Squatinaformes either way. 

 

Heterodontus semirugosus

Paracestracion falcifer- both are Heterodontiformes.

 

Palaeoscyllium formosum- our oldest Carcharhiniformes. While teeth from this site are not at all rare I think this one might be on the rare side. The smallest, under 2mm, from this location.

 

Pseudospinax- our oldest Orectolobiformes tooth. I believe all three of our teeth would be Pseudospinax but there are two other Carpet Sharks described here. 

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  • 3 months later...

Kimmeridgian echinoid spine, 20 mm

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Oxfordian gastropod Tornatellaea frearsiana, 7 mm

6.jpg

 

Oxfordian gastropod Clathrobaculus inconstantiplicatus, 12 mm

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Oxfordian shark tooth, probably Synechodus (Palaeospinax), 4 mm

IMG20210215103159.jpg

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will stevenson
On 11/14/2020 at 8:37 AM, fossilsonwheels said:

Here are some cool micro shark teeth from Ringstead Bay, Weymouth United Kingdom.  We have been able to find a fair number of teeth from this well studied Jurassic chondrichthyes assemblage. We have roughly 3/4 of the fauna in our collection. This one site has given us our oldest fossils from 4 extant orders of sharks and our oldest Batoid tooth as well.

 

Great finds, what did you use to identify them?

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fossilsonwheels
29 minutes ago, will stevenson said:

 

Great finds, what did you use to identify them?

Publications. There is a publication on the fauna on Fossilworks that helped provide the species list and I searched for examples of each species to confirm the ID. I think I ended up using 3 or 4 different publications. 

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TOM BUCKLEY

World's smallest rugose coral? 2mm.

Cornulites hamiltonlae

Wanakah Shale

Penn-Dixie Quarry

Hamburg, NY

Middle-Devonian

MINI CORAL.jpg

Edited by TOM BUCKLEY
Wrong ID.
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Bonehunter

Just assembled a Leica M420 scope, phototubes, Sony A660 camera with HDMI cable to my tabletop TV screeen and BOOYAH!- my first conodont pic!........Many, many more to follow!!

 

Bone

conodont2a.thumb.jpg.6ea59b80b86dd2fab3a086fb604f24bb.jpg

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Crusty_Crab

Not sure if you ever got an ID for these, but they're too cool to pass up. 

On 2/23/2020 at 5:25 PM, Bobby Rico said:

Now for something different from me, baltic amber with some bugs inclusions. I can’t ID them probably flys/mosquitoes ? I don’t have any stacking software just an iPhone and clip on lens.  I think they are not to bad photos.  Cheers Bobby 

 

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I believe this to be a beetle, order Coleoptera. I've circled what I believe to be striations on the elytra. The broad, flattened shape of the head reminds me of the click beetles, family Elateridae, but a better viewing angle is needed.

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Fly, order Diptera. The circled antennae appear to be aristate. 

Inkedmidge_LI.thumb.jpg.765c2e4a444b78396f460b30199b4f18.jpg

Order Diptera. The halteres are clearly visible (labeled a), which is characteristic of the order. The antennae (labelled b) are featherlike with the narrow abdomen gives it a midge-like appearance, family Chironomidae if I had to hazard a guess.

917407613_Inkedfly2_LI.thumb.jpg.de4cfcf07e3da9f73234d33dbeb85e94.jpg

Probably a fly, order Diptera. What look like halteres are in the circled area.

Inkedorthoptera_LI.thumb.jpg.a172acf65a523aa14d732d599078261b.jpg

Looks like an Orthopteran (crickets, grasshoppers, katydids) to me. Long legs, long slender antennae. 

 

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Crusty_Crab

While on the subject of insects, these are from the Eocene Green River Formation, taken with a 20x macro lens clipped onto a smartphone.

DGP201002018-1.thumb.jpg.deef9972211b4818c2d9aa98a4abb496.jpg

Beetle, order Coleoptera. It looks like it has a snout, making it a weevil, family Curculionidae.

 

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Order Diptera, with the halteres and wing venation clearly visible.

 

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Another beetle, order Coleoptera, with the elytra spread as in flight. Unfortunately, the hind wings do not appear to have been preserved.

 

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christieattewell

Opalised fossil from lightning ridge under micro probably small tooth 

 

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IsaacTheFossilMan
On 10/6/2020 at 8:36 PM, RuMert said:

Craspedites sp. ammonite, 15 mm

IMG_20200918_1133211.jpg

That ammonite is stunning! The original mother of pearl! ;)

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OregonFossil

So, yesterday I was doing some work on some talus and near the end I picked up two rocks (one sandstone from the Pittsburg Bluff formation (PBF, Miocene) and the other deep water shale (>1000') from the Keasey Formation (Eocene), each only have a shell piece showing on the outside. The Sandstone (PBF) is consolidated but all it take is a gentle tap from the Gpick while the Shale (KF) is extremely fine grained and very, very hard. I was going to toss both since I have some very good casts and molds of these formations bivalve molluscs.

 

Then I thought why not  at least break them in half(both were between 6" and 8" on the longest dimension). The sandstone split and much to my astonishment there was a cast and a mold of a mollusc (wide dimension: 30mm)with lots of details in the mold and cast. Enough that I will take the time and ID it (lots of mollusc species in the PBF). The image I have attached of it shows clearly the none symmetric  shape and other ID points. Am going to leave it in the matrix as I like the look.

 

The PDB has significantly more marine fossils than does the KF in my experience. The Keasey shale being deep water is a made of very fine particulate matter that is extremely hard to break, even with my 3 pound hand sledge hammer. When I hit this piece of shale, the first time it broke a small sliver off and the second time a four inch piece flew off. Like the rest of the piece just a bit of shale was in the 4". However in the voild left was a 10mm smooth sided Dentalium. I have found in a different layer of the KF some large ribbed Dentalium. But in the site from where this one came from this is the first one I've found there. All of the other Dentalium have been a ribbed species leaving me very interested to ID this one. Again I will leave it in the matrix as due to its size, the hardness of the shale, and the fact that this might be rare in this specific locality I will wait until I contact a few folks who have studied this formation in case they are interested. Images shot with Panasonic G9, Olympus 60mm macro lens, and an electronic flash.

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