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Petalodus12

My Best Carboniferous Finds

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Petalodus12

The next are the bellerophontids Euphemites, primitive Gastropods that went extinct in the Mesozoic. The smaller one is sitting in the larger ones living chamber. 

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Petalodus12

Another gastropod, again from the Ames. It’s of an unknown genus and species.

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Petalodus12

Here is one of my rarest finds, the insanely worn tail of a trilobite. From the Brush Creek Marine Zone.

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Petalodus12

Thats all for now, I’ll upload more in the coming days. Thanks for reading.

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Tidgy's Dad

And thank you for sharing.

Some super finds there and a diverse group of creatures too. :)

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Arlie

Very cool! Thanks for sharing

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Ruger9a

Congratulations on your finds.  Great photos as well, thanks for sharing.

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FossilNerd

Great stuff! That Mooreoceras is probably my favorite. 

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Bullsnake

Great finds!

I'll be watching this thread:look:

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connorp
1 hour ago, Petalodus12 said:

Now for the vertebrates. Most people don’t know that you can find shark teeth in Pittsburgh, but that is most definitely the case. Here is the tooth of Petalodus, a strange shark that is related to Chimaeras and went extinct during the Permian 

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What are the striations on it? Never seen them on a petalodus tooth before.

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Petalodus12
44 minutes ago, connorp said:

What are the striations on it? Never seen them on a petalodus tooth before.

Not exactly sure.  They could be quirks of preservation.

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Petalodus12

Here is something that I’ve posted before but I figure I should post again. It’s the neurocranium of a Ray finned fish, either a Haplolepid or Paleoniscoid. It is another one of the specimens that will most likely be donated. It was found in the black shale above the Duquesne Limestone, as were many of the verts. It’s probably one of my favorite fossils.

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Petalodus12

D7EDCC8A-1D6C-47A2-926F-756C2EE33B9F.thumb.jpeg.0f9e6780606412e5471f90e41defb726.jpegHere is arguably the most intriguing thing I have found so far. As to not make conjectures all I can say is that this is a jumble of bones from something that is most likely not a ray finned fish or lungfish. Ribs are the only bones that I have been able to make a confident ID on. This may be wishful thinking on my behalf but to me it looks like lepospondyl remains, but I really have no clue. The only thing that really cues me on to lepospondyl is that in R.Lund’s 70s paper on the Duquesne Limestone, he mentions that very fragmented microsaur bones can be found. But as I said before, I really have no clue so any input would be great. 

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Petalodus12

I mentioned earlier on in this thread that complete fish are very rare. This is very much the case. Many may know about the Linton locality and the stunning preservation of its fossils, including thousands of complete fish. In the Pittsburgh area this is the exception to the rule.  Freshwater Vertebrate remains are rarely found outside shales directly above coal seams and in freshwater limestones. These layers are often inconsistent in their distribution and are very thin (less than 4 feet thick). Plus, these layers are often associated with paleosols and fragile shakes that quickly weather into soil in Pittsburgh’s wet and forested region. So basically you can use all of the studies and geological maps you have but you may come to find that your prized layer is covered in forest, which is unfortunate, or a development or shopping mall (which is worse). All this being said, I have been very luck as to have found a jumbled up fish in the black shale above the Duquesne Limestone. It will most likely be donated. Needless to say I was ecstatic when I found it.

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Petalodus12

My last vertebrate for today. It’s a possible lungfish tooth. Same layer as fish. It might not be a lungfish tooth, the length of the root throws me off. 

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FossilsNS

DEFFINITLEY a invertebrate trackway (Diplichnites sp.) most likely produced by a small myriapod. Very nice!

 

 

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