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MarcoSr

A few more Riker mount displays with macro specimens from the Miocene of Virginia

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Tidgy's Dad

I love these displays. 

I really must get some of these Riker doobries.

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Gizmo

Very nice Marco, congrats! :D

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FossilsAnonymous

You’re collections are simply astounding. The bony fish display :wub: 

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MarcoSr
4 hours ago, Tidgy's Dad said:

I love these displays. 

I really must get some of these Riker doobries.

 

Thank you.  My biggest problem with the Riker mount displays was figuring out what sizes to buy, especially the depth.

 

Marco Sr.

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MarcoSr
2 hours ago, Gizmo said:

Very nice Marco, congrats! :D

 

Walt

 

Thank you.  I feel much better about my collection as I'm organizing it more.

 

Marco Sr.

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MarcoSr
52 minutes ago, FossilsAnonymous said:

You’re collections are simply astounding. The bony fish display :wub: 

 

Thank you.  There are/were a lot of top fossil collecting sites close to where I live in Virginia.

 

Marco Sr.

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MarcoSr

Below is another of my 16”X12” Riker mount displays for macro fossils.  All of the specimens in this display came from the Miocene/Pliocene/Pleistocene Pungo River/Yorktown/James City Formations from the Lee Creek Mine in Aurora, North Carolina.  It really was sad when the Lee Creek Mine itself was closed to collecting.  I wish I had made more trips when the mine was open.  My sons made many more trips than I did.  I only made 7 or so trips into the mine itself and a couple of trips into the Block areas.  I have boxes and a good number of gem jar displays with other macro and micro specimens.

 

The top of this display contains Cetacean flipper bones and vertebrae.  Then some sperm whale teeth (for size reference the largest is 3.5”), several Otodus Chubutensis shark teeth and a small Otodus megalodon, with Cetacean periotic ear bones at the far right.  Then 9 associated shark vertebrae on the far left, shells and more shark vertebrae on the far right.  The bottom right has two sturgeon scutes, a worm tube grouping, and a bony fish vertebra.

 

 

5e20dcc9e91ee_MiocenePliocenePleistocenePungoRiverYorktownJamesCityFormationsLeeCreekMineNorthCarolina.thumb.jpg.1e29b103e80682e2e32d0705410ebf88.jpg

 

 

 

The Lee Creek Mine had an incredible diversity of shells.  I’m really sorry that I didn’t really collect many when I had the chance.

 

Marco Sr.

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Darktooth

These displays are really great. So many great specimens. Thanks for sharing these. :dinothumb:

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MarcoSr
4 hours ago, Darktooth said:

These displays are really great. So many great specimens. Thanks for sharing these. :dinothumb:

 

Thank you.   I'll post more Saturday if my Riker mount displays show up as expected.

 

Marco Sr.

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