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Brach3

Dear all, if Devonian Epizoans (Epibionts) & Pathological Brachiopods (all the periods) are a fascinating group of fossils for you and you want to discuss anything about their paleoecology, please post your photos (specimens) in this thread. 

 

 

Edited by Brach3

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Mediospirifer

I'll just add a few links to my threads with related topics.

 

Pathological Brachiopods! (LINK)

Community on the Half-Shell (LINK)

Encrusted With Mystery: Can Anyone Tell Me What The Pattern Is? (LINK)

 

And a teaser, until I can get this specimen under the microscope. Are Ordovician epizoans welcome?

 

5e25384f59aee_Edrio1.thumb.jpg.16149e251f187442d4b3c075c5e2901b.jpg

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Peat Burns
On 1/20/2020 at 12:19 AM, Mediospirifer said:

 

5e25384f59aee_Edrio1.thumb.jpg.16149e251f187442d4b3c075c5e2901b.jpg

:default_faint:

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Brach3
12 hours ago, Mediospirifer said:

Is this what you're looking for? :P:D

 

:SlapHands: Yes, thank you! It's so nice when the morning starts with a new photo of Epizoans.

 

10 hours ago, Mediospirifer said:

And a teaser, until I can get this specimen under the microscope. Are Ordovician epizoans welcome?

Yes, but I don't know Ordovician epizoans )

There is a desire to watch them (very big difference with Devon)! 

 

Pathological Brachiopods (all the periods) are the same, but epizoans... :D 

D2 (USA) and D3 (Russia) are very different, that's why I am here (something new).

 

image.png.0d2848baee6791f29aa874749d698ca4.png

№2 Crinoid holdfast 

"?" Can it be Phylum: Echinodermata  Class: Edrioasteroidea?

 

10 hours ago, Mediospirifer said:

Pathological Brachiopods! (LINK)

Community on the Half-Shell (LINK)

Encrusted With Mystery: Can Anyone Tell Me What The Pattern Is? (LINK)

 

"Pathological Brachiopods! (LINK)" - my answer link and link

"Community on the Half-Shell (LINK)" - my answer link

"Encrusted With Mystery: Can Anyone Tell Me What The Pattern Is? (LINK)" - my answer link

 

Some papers: Epizoans on late Ordovician brachiopods from Southeastern Indiana Richard R. Alexander  & Carl D. Scharpf, 1990 (unfortunately there is no such epizoan) and Autecology of Richmondian Brachiopods (Late Ordovician of Indiana and Ohio) R. Peter Richards, 1972 with life assemblage (life position) of some brachiopods (life assemblage are welcome too!!!)

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Mediospirifer

Here are some more detailed photos of my edrioasteroid specimen. :D

 

First, the edrio (species unknown):

 

5e2943078d480_Edrio3.thumb.jpg.3734eb6fe5a4ddcd0e8edfe0b43e07b1.jpg

 

Next, the cornulitid:

 

Cornulitid.thumb.jpg.a0e93934e9f8b7d8fa229367e58a3970.jpg

 

And the bryozoan (I think!) that lurks between them:

 

Bryozoan.thumb.jpg.40bc169a3efa5910bf3b57e4aab44cc1.jpg

 

More to come! :D


 

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Brach3

image.png.5d956282cf9e4819d90e3f866812087d.png

 

it's :zen: so beautiful!!!

 

10 hours ago, Mediospirifer said:

which also comes right up to the aperture but doesn't cross

"It is apparent that the bryozoan had encrusted a living brachiopod"

 

10 hours ago, Mediospirifer said:

I don't see the pores I'd expect from a bryozoan or coral.

image.png.cdea2c9dd81340308b9d14db4d573eaf.png

I haven't understood, is it an epizoan? :blink: or like this situation link ?

 

hm, there is no Vinlandostrophia sp. in Treatise ...

oh, Vinlandostrophia = Platystrophia King, 1850

 

image.png.a5b426dcf83bf0354d60c8eac8f4c2b5.pngimage.png.9ddb4efc09efe86dc07fc277fb7d69d6.png

 

"costate and finely granulose" - ok

image.png.8ef4141f9592b15e413949a7dc252d39.png

 

10 hours ago, Mediospirifer said:

I don't see the pores I'd expect from a bryozoan or coral.

and I :unsure: only pixels... 

 

 5e29d97306745_.JPG.0f736de3d3a576f714c080347ae5abee.JPG

 

It looks like epizoans... :headscratch: 

image.png.47abc11901c39fd0fa9bfee9be023edf.png

 

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Mediospirifer
3 hours ago, Brach3 said:

it's :zen: so beautiful!!!

 

I agree! I was rather startled when I saw that.

 

3 hours ago, Brach3 said:

and I :unsure: only pixels... 

 

Yes, these photos were taken and posted quickly. I brought my standalone digital microscope in to work with me yesterday, and took the pictures during my lunch break! I wanted to share something immediately.

 

I'm thinking it might be an algae. The bumps appear to be pyritized.

 

I'll plan some time to photograph them in as much detail as I can and do image stacking. It'll be next week before I have results to post; the image stacking software is on my computer at work.

 

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Brach3
13 hours ago, Mediospirifer said:

I'm thinking it might be an algae. The bumps appear to be pyritized.

 

image.png.47abc11901c39fd0fa9bfee9be023edf.pngimage.thumb.png.8ad8e836be4ab24aa8f3ce786d6b811c.png

 

For @Mediospirifer:

 

Pyritization is something new for me. I haven't met such Epizoans before. In this paper (link) sciences write: "However, due to locally low pH, dysoxic microenvironment within the sulphate-reduction zone, the soft thalli underwent pyritization and their delicate calcified sheath dissolved. This may be supported by some of the associated encrusters having calcitic skeletons, which have also dissolved and underwent pyritization. (e.g., Brett et al. 1991; Marynowski et al. 2007; Bond and Wignall 2010)", "Only those thalli which entered a specific microenvironment had a chance to be pyritized and thus fossilized. Such reducing microenvironment in the sediment is uncommon in most shallow, well-oxygenated waters within the photic zone." 

 

There is an other very interesting specimen from Middle Devonian (Silica Formation) and also Pyritization! It's a very rare chance to be saved for fossil!  

5e2aa9ff38554_.thumb.JPG.6cdaa2c34819e706ccaf43a673e1b1c4.JPG

 

If expected an Algae on Vinlandostrophia's valve then we must have paper (article for ideal to check hypothesis) and more detail photos :P so I'll wait for it

 

For @Misha:

 

image.png.b6c99c986f80c6d2f936779dfcbe8982.pngimage.png.67745fadb7986d45ac86e7b5eca44694.pngimage.png.fd02b495d032b9dba0774ab7f5502f75.png

 

:blink: wow

 

Is it a common specimen for your fields (gathering place)? I have seen only one such big "Crinoid holdfast" from D3 (Russia). Mostly there are only small specimens. About your "Crinoid holdfast" it can be "Relationships to live hosts" because a larva of crinoid attached to the brachiopod when the brachiopod was alive. Why not? We don't have any contradictions. And Crinoid could grown when brachiopod was alive and after it's death.  

 

image.png.7fc85e988e032a6a13a1d30cb0fb28ce.png

It's interesting. I call shuch fossils "sandwiches" because "coral1 + algae + coral2 + another organisms and etc".

 

image.png.32a50f37cb103cb9593b99e7d87152e2.png

 

Sometimes it's very interesting to see the suitable substrates, interspecific interactions and trying to predict the competitive outcomes... absorption of one by another.

image.png.5828d52a40909324bad70fcfc9d402e4.png  

 

Have you found any variants o "the classic bioclaustration" in D2? (example from Ordovic link).

 

@Al Tahan@Shamalama@Fossildude19

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Misha
4 hours ago, Brach3 said:

Is it a common specimen for your fields (gathering place)? 

I actually have no idea, this was found at the Penn Dixie fossil park from my first trip, but I have not seen other holdfasts like it from there.

 

5 hours ago, Brach3 said:

Have you found any variants o "the classic bioclaustration" in D2?

I personally have not found any examples of bioclaustration in any of my fossils.

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Mediospirifer
13 hours ago, Brach3 said:

Pyritization is something new for me. I haven't met such Epizoans before. 

 

It's fairly common in the Devonian shales of New York (such as the site Misha's specimens are from). The Vinlandostrophia doesn't actually show the right color under higher magnification, though. It turns out that was an artifact of the photography.

 

Here's a closer view, at full magnification for my microscope and camera:

 

Image2642.thumb.jpg.3b74bf4487d5e8aad8e2574213500839.jpg

 

It's not pyritized. It's a similar color to the brachiopod.

 

Looking at the smaller patch of bryozoan, I see that it has a pattern of small bumps on its surface that could be the same type of structure seen above:

 

Image2661.thumb.jpg.9fcc5502e8a53a280b2a172c79c17e8f.jpg

 

So, the large patch is probably a different species of bryozoan with larger zooecia. I'll scrape off as much of the matrix as I can (it's fairly soft; I should be able to remove it with a plastic toothpick) the weekend and take more images when I see what it looks like.

 

Apologies for the blurry images, I'll be able to do better with image stacking. I might be able to do that on Wednesday. In the meantime, here are a couple of closeups of the aperture with small bryozoan:

 

Image2666.thumb.jpg.61881314d66f4c54d8d097a841af0c20.jpg

 

Image2676.thumb.jpg.1fbb64485633bcae7dec497798bfb8a8.jpg

 

I also want to experiment with my lighting to see if I can highlight the structural features. My ring light tends to lose all shadows and make everything look flat.

 

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Mediospirifer
5 hours ago, Mediospirifer said:

It's fairly common in the Devonian shales of New York (such as the site Misha's specimens are from). The Vinlandostrophia doesn't actually show the right color under higher magnification, though. It turns out that was an artifact of the photography.

 

I should clarify, pyritization of hard fossils, burrow infillings, or coprolites is fairly common. Pyritized epizoans attached to non-pyritized macrofossil is much less so. I haven't seen one in my collection, although I should take a closer look at a couple of specimens... They're not immediately accessible, so it will be a few days before I can get them under my microscope.

 

Here's and example of a few tiny pyritized fossils I collected at Penn-Dixie back in 2014. Not epizoans or pathologicals, but you might like the one left of center:

 

IMG_0570.thumb.JPG.7b6f07a8d3296d129d7a5d857595a5df.JPG

 

:D

 

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Brach3
10 hours ago, Mediospirifer said:

Looking at the smaller patch of bryozoan, I see that it has a pattern of small bumps on its surface that could be the same type of structure seen above:

image.thumb.png.3674b81293c40a8421bc9dd5fd5c9d49.pngimage.png.bb6ea5ba27e174b0db42623b130ccb35.png

 

Yes, it looks like similar / identical specimen, how old & young bryozoan.

I haven't found similar specimens from data photos from Russia. 

See "Cincinnati, Ohio, US" (red circle) + "Saint Petersburg, St.-Petersburg, RU" (There is our planet in different periods :zen:). 

May be it was so far, May be our paleo-hunters don't post/photo their specimens I don't know... but we can make 5-10 photos of different specimens and show them.

I've seen such "bubbling" in D2 (Stromatoporoidea, but I can't show these pictures)...

 

image.png.336b7b509e21a178f5a257b8d8e8d4d9.png


And here link I don't understand what it is. 

image.png.18cec729599655bd8670448a7fd4af89.png

 

I get the impression (maybe wrong) that everything in Ordovician was "bubbling" and covered with"buttons". :oyh:

 

"Edrioasteroids are not common at that site. This is the only one I've found."

image.png.dd0550b93566f39fdecf309a286b9b2c.png

 

My Congratulations!!!

 

I had an erroneous/wrong understanding about such specimens. I didn't know they were rare

Because some users (from one paleo forum from Russia) post these specimens and I thought it was an ordinary find 

:heartylaugh:

 

Edrioasteroidea:

 

Ordovic

Carneyella pilea (Hall, 1866) on the Rafinesquina cf. nasutam  valve

Manchester, Indiana, USA

image.thumb.png.9ea0fdc7571f04e16e6f8fc117fc9576.pngimage.png.dc96b0a0056e22badcd96dfb4234405f.png

 

Canada:

Belochthus orthokolus Bell, 1977

Brechin, Ontario, Canada

image.png.bb6f092837415bdbc1c941b03365f3c2.pngimage.thumb.png.24b5145007dd39d7907175fb847f96ab.pngimage.png.ab711d122af27855bdadbfa24391d0e2.png

 

Isorophusella incondita (Raymond, 1915)

image.png.15e7093a0db5d8a92d9ab59f98940fad.png

 

Cryptogoleus chapmani (Raymond, 1915)

image.thumb.png.f225f44d18c839b603186aaea7e435ca.pngimage.thumb.png.fc77a24c28d296ccfce6f3aea901d28a.png

 

And it's a very rare for D3 Russia too. It has been found only 2-3 for 100 years (only 2-3 were found in 100 years).  

These specimens are from different papers for 100 years :)

image.thumb.png.0bd0d9fac08af832f9b3a815af202e16.pngimage.thumb.png.f9efc4e7f7d76bf401224a8a598b07fc.pngimage.thumb.png.ef975c46a075d51c0ee2d841bc703543.png 

 

@Al Tahan from D2 (Silica Formation)

5e2c0ad4380f2_.JPG.8d6dc758c1f24b3493b0857546f827fe.JPG

image.thumb.png.07884a50ad039a53fe7afaedd1f22faf.png

 

@Mediospirifer @Shamalama @Fossildude19 @Misha

 

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Mediospirifer
19 hours ago, Brach3 said:

It can be barnacle borings on valve. Please check this specimen with paper. Why not?

 

I'll have to access the first two from work (on Tuesday). 

 

The borings in the figures of the third paper appear to be fairly randomly placed, as well as partly overgrown by shell deposition. They're also much larger than the pits in my specimen. Remember, my specimen is only about 2 mm wide. The pits follow a fairly regular pattern, so I think they're a feature of the species. They may be an indication that the specimen had spines on the surface.

 

19 hours ago, Brach3 said:

I can't see the holdfast :headscratch:it's look like the rise of bryozoans

 

This is the base of a bryozoan that probably looked a lot like the first photo on this page: LINK. That one is Devonian (I have a couple like it), while this is Ordovician, so not likely the same species. I don't see evidence of a hollow core to this specimen.

 

19 hours ago, Brach3 said:

or like this hold fast of bryozoans (Dittopora clavaeformis Dybowski, 1877 from Ordovic) ?

 

Possibly. I may have to grind the broken end to see what the internal structure looks like. That might allow an identification. :D

 

I think the ostracod was a free-living organism that happened to drop a shell on the bryo, rather than an epibiont. It's a nice little specimen, I just don't have a reference guide to ostracod identification.

 

I'll try to get some better photos, and access the papers you've linked. I'm going to be very busy at the lab for the next couple of days, so downloading papers and stacking photos may have to wait until the current project deadline is past.

 

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