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Ludwigia

What might this little biddy shark tooth be?

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Ludwigia

I found this little guy amongst the usual Carcharias and Mitsukurina teeth at my often frequented spot in the Miocene Burdigalian (Obere Meeresmolasse Formation) in southwestern Germany and am a bit stumped, so I'm hoping that someone here can help me out with the id. The longest edge is 6mm.

 

4a.thumb.jpg.aa27d48a0f1b78bf0bf3b86265692475.jpg

4b.thumb.jpg.32996619cc6ffc5841c8443febfa6861.jpg

 

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gigantoraptor

Based on those serrations I think a partial Galeocerdo sp.

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minnbuckeye
13 minutes ago, gigantoraptor said:

Based on those serrations

  

I have looked at this tooth and can't see serrations. Roger, does it have them?

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gigantoraptor
2 minutes ago, minnbuckeye said:

  

I have looked at this tooth and can't see serrations. Roger, does it have them?

You can see serrations toward the root and a hint of serrations further on the crown.

image.png

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Ludwigia
1 hour ago, gigantoraptor said:

Based on those serrations I think a partial Galeocerdo sp.

I was thinking along those lines, but the serrations are so minimal with nothing obvious on the cutting edges.

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Plax

might this be a broken off side cusp of something? This is just a wild guess not saying it's so.

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Ludwigia
38 minutes ago, Plax said:

might this be a broken off side cusp of something? This is just a wild guess not saying it's so.

That's a possibility, but it must have been a pretty big tooth if that's the case. And I can't find a form to fit the idea.

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cck

Partial notorynchus? Serrations are on the wrong side of the curve for a tiger... 

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The Jersey Devil

It is Carcharhinus sp.

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Ludwigia
11 minutes ago, The Jersey Devil said:

It is Carcharhinus sp.

I was wondering about that too. How can you tell?

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The Jersey Devil
15 minutes ago, Ludwigia said:

I was wondering about that too. How can you tell?


The general shape of Carcharhinus matches this tooth better than the other similar looking ones like tigers and hemis

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cck

Tigers do not have serrations outside of the curve...unless I’m wrong...this is what I was thinking absent the root and with damage

1E6892C4-3B8D-4964-85DC-E0E8FB51EC7E.jpeg

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cck

But Charcharhinus fits too

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Ludwigia
44 minutes ago, The Jersey Devil said:


The general shape of Carcharhinus matches this tooth better than the other similar looking ones like tigers and hemis

 

13 minutes ago, cck said:

But Charcharhinus fits too

Thanks guys. I think that's as close as we're going to get.

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siteseer

Yes, a partial upper tooth of Carcharhinus.  A few species have coarser serrations toward the base of the crown with finer ones toward the tip.  The way that specimen wore down looks like that general form.

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FossilsAnonymous
2 hours ago, The Jersey Devil said:

It is Carcharhinus sp.

I agree. Most likely some form of silky.

2 hours ago, Ludwigia said:

I was wondering about that too. How can you tell?

It is all in the root here, and how the blade goes into the root. The root has a certain match. It was fortunate that I came upon this post while looking through some Carcharhinids, and was able to match the root immediately after reading The Jersey Devil's post. Funny how things work out like that.

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The Jersey Devil
3 hours ago, cck said:

Tigers do not have serrations outside of the curve...unless I’m wrong...this is what I was thinking absent the root and with damage

1E6892C4-3B8D-4964-85DC-E0E8FB51EC7E.jpeg


tiger crowns are fully serrated on all curves 

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cck

Yes and no. These are the serrations I was referring to... on the inside of the curve .. pronounced.. very minimal on the outside. I was just trying to rule out tiger for the poster... I’m no authority on anything

02C86694-6B50-4437-86C9-F678C6AC41FB.jpeg

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Ludwigia
7 hours ago, FossilsAnonymous said:

I agree. Most likely some form of silky.

It is all in the root here, and how the blade goes into the root. The root has a certain match. It was fortunate that I came upon this post while looking through some Carcharhinids, and was able to match the root immediately after reading The Jersey Devil's post. Funny how things work out like that.

I know what you mean. If a certain paleontologist hadn't been looking at a particular lobster genus as I sent him a photo of the one I found, then I might not have had a species named after me.

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