Jump to content
Jerry W.

Outing at BLM in NM (amended)

Recommended Posts

Shamalama

Cool finds! Could you notify someone in a local museum about the exposed bone? Maybe they could go out and collect it before it erodes away to nothing.

 

Also, the diamond shapes are interesting. Did you keep any of it and can you get a closer view of the wood grain near the edge of a diamond?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fossildude19

That is pretty cool looking petrified wood.  :)

Thanks for showing us. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jerry W.
1 hour ago, Shamalama said:

Cool finds! Could you notify someone in a local museum about the exposed bone? Maybe they could go out and collect it before it erodes away to nothing.

 

Also, the diamond shapes are interesting. Did you keep any of it and can you get a closer view of the wood grain near the edge of a diamond?

I did keep a piece of the petrified cypress wood and will take a close-up photo of it and submit here soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jerry W.
2 hours ago, Shamalama said:

Cool finds! Could you notify someone in a local museum about the exposed bone? Maybe they could go out and collect it before it erodes away to nothing.

 

Also, the diamond shapes are interesting. Did you keep any of it and can you get a closer view of the wood grain near the edge of a diamond?

Here is a close-up view of the wood.  Sorry, but I can't get any better with my cell phone.

cypress closeup 1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shamalama

Could those be knots or perhaps roots that were grown around?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jerry W.
12 hours ago, Shamalama said:

Could those be knots or perhaps roots that were grown around?

Apparently, some modern cypress trees still bear similar holes.  Here is something I copied from a website that explains it:

“Pecky” is an unusual name for an unusual “variety” of Sinker Cypress. A cross-section cut of a Pecky Sinker Cypress log reveals something you don’t normally see in a slice of wood – lots of irregular shaped holes. And these holes are what give it a character that sets it apart from any other wood – including other cypress logs.

What’s interesting is that those Pecky holes are actually caused by a type of fungus that creates hollow tubes running vertically throughout the tree. That’s where the unique appearance comes from when we cut the wood.

This fungus only grows while the tree is alive, but what’s even more interesting is that the fungus typically doesn’t start to germinate inside the Cypress tree until it’s around 125 years old! This explains why finding a Pecky Cypress log is so rare today.

 

I knew nothing about this tree prior to this research, so I guess even an old dog can learn something new too.  Attached is a photo of a pecky cypress log.

cypress, pecky log 1 s50 web.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Shamalama

Well, that is fascinating! Good job of researching. :) :yay-smiley-1:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kato

Awesome! We are down in SW New Mexico. Early April we plan to head to Cortez, CO and it's good to know there are 'younger' trees to be found on BLM land. Down here we are Devonian-Permian.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jerry W.
2 hours ago, Kato said:

Awesome! We are down in SW New Mexico. Early April we plan to head to Cortez, CO and it's good to know there are 'younger' trees to be found on BLM land. Down here we are Devonian-Permian.

Where you are is where I like to hunt rocks and minerals - from Deming on in to Arizona.  There is a lot of petrified wood in my immediate area and some sea-type fossils too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×