Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Common or Scientific Name - Helorus arturi sp. nov. (Hymenoptera, Proctotrupoidea, Heloridae) from Baltic amber


Geologic Formation or Geologic Age - Eocene Era.


Region the fossil was found - Baltic Sea shore - Wisla's River Estuary. Poland.


Museum or University that received the fossil - University Of Helsinki. Finnish Museum of Natural History. Finland.


Article - https://www.researchgate.net/publication/343997607_Helorus_arturi_sp_nov_Hymenoptera_Proctotrupoidea_Heloridae_from_Baltic_amber

Hello my fossil maniacs.
Thank you for suggestions about put it also here. It is my latest find described with my name as founder. ( already got few more )
I am happy becouse this is first wasp finally and also very important for science.
Here is author citation from my social media :

 

"An excellent example of how important work you fossil hunters do! This particular animal is a really interesting one, uniting present day helorids to extinct ones!"

 
That's why i am doing this. Everyday searching for treasures in ambers. Also i am from Poland where we got deposits so it is for me kind of haritage.
This is not easy  to find something new but with determination we can do big things.

Best wishes from Poland.

Artur


 

859441054_5821SuperbWasp.jpg

P5020002.JPG

  • I found this Informative 5
  • Enjoyed 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

Otodus/Carcharacles sokolovi (or early angustidens)

Mint Springs Marl., Rupelian

Smith Co., Mississippi

Mississippi Museum of Natural Science 

Complete specimens of this scientifically important shark are rare from this age.

 

unnamed-1.jpg

unnamed.jpg

  • I found this Informative 6
  • Enjoyed 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
deutscheben

 

 

 

Lysorophian tetrapod

Shelburn Formation - Pennsylvanian

Vermilion County, IL

Found in 2019, Donated to the Field Museum of Natural History, May 2021

This is a rare and scientifically significant Pennsylvanian tetrapod.


FA12056C-0ECD-4A3E-8C5C-BC281FA8C748.thumb.jpeg.bc67670c296958fbc05390807cf9067f.jpeg
 

0704232C-7E91-43D2-A668-AA32DB6F0B4F.thumb.jpeg.8887e1f41177c0cfbea49d88f162b56d.jpeg

 

 

 
  • I found this Informative 5
  • Enjoyed 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

Scientific Names: Elimia livescens (juvenile), Somatogyrus depressus, Sphaerium striatinum, Pleurocera acuta

Geologic Formation: Equality Formation

Geologic Age: Quaternary

Region fossils were found: Cook County, IL

Museum or University that received the fossils: Prairie Research Institute

Reason for donation: Radiocarbon dating for geologic mapping project.

 

mollusk3.thumb.jpg.410083635a395232e9b8f66e4e8ef09a.jpg

 

mollusk6.thumb.jpg.070138fc8362970ff7955ea3dbc7a2b3.jpg

 

mollusk5.thumb.jpg.fb38899a45d6917af21ae410ba9a2888.jpg

 

mollusk1.thumb.jpg.73ab5ca486980d0054c03cabd2d6a684.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by aek
  • I found this Informative 5
  • Enjoyed 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Ischnacanthid jaw section

Catskill Formation

Upper Devonian

Donated to Dave Broussard of Lycoming College

One of three specimens from that location.

 

6309311_DSCN3040crop.thumb.jpg.09e6492f0040547fbbb0cecdbdfcb71f.jpg

 

Image courtesy of Dave Broussard

  • I found this Informative 7
  • Enjoyed 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

Common or Scientific Name:  Endoceras sp. endocone
Geologic Formation or Geologic Age.  Georgian Bay Formation, Upper Ordovician
Region the fossil was found.  Etobicoke Creek, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Museum or University that received the fossil.  Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto, Ontario, Canada


A short note explaining the reason for the fossil contribution.

The ROM was interested in this specimen because it's a very well-preserved endocone fossil from Endoceras sp. 

Here's a letter of acknowledgement from the ROM:

 

ROM donation letter for Endoceras endocone fossil 2021.pdf

 

Photos:

 

DSC03218.JPG-vert.jpg

 

  • I found this Informative 14
  • Enjoyed 5
  • Thank You 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
historianmichael

Common or Scientific Name: Fragment of a Cidaroid with Six Associated Plates
Geologic Formation: Prairie Bluff Chalk

Geologic Age: Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian)
Region the fossil was found: Alabama

Museum that received the fossil: Mississippi Museum of Natural Science

A short note explaining the reason for the fossil contribution: Associated cidaroid plates are quite rare and up to this point, the museum had no specimen with greater than two associated plates- this specimen has six! This specimen has the potential to finally identify the common Maastrichtian cidaroid of the Gulf Coastal Plain to genus level

 

411273989_EchinoidPiece.thumb.png.59523d3c15215698c1f2fb8d77f86209.png 338892039_ScreenShot2022-01-02at8_07_27PM.thumb.png.52a05ca8cc4a39203a6788773d4c99e3.png

  • I found this Informative 2
  • Enjoyed 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 weeks later...
MarcusFossils

Name: Will be revealed soon (similar to Furca)

Formation/Age: Bobcaygeon Formation, Upper Ordovician (Edenian)

Region: Lake Simcoe, Ontario, Canada

Repository: ROM

 

I donated this fossil because I felt it deserved to be published, although I was very tempted to keep it. 

 

 

 

 

120552254_10223988674925080_8405768809536107000_o.jpg

120578788_1832656883552958_3923752153159696176_o.jpg

120601314_1832654906886489_742990946083685188_o.jpg

Edited by MarcusFossils
  • I found this Informative 1
  • Enjoyed 10
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Common or Scientific Name: Shansiella?
Geologic Formation: Glenshaw Formation

Geologic Age: Upper Pennsylvanian / Kasimovian
Region the fossil was found: Armstrong County, Pennsylvania, USA

Museum that received the fossil: Carnegie Museum of Natural History

A short note explaining the reason for the fossil contribution: What is now known as CM 54968, is a unusually large example of Shansiella found in local rocks. Perhaps it is due to smashing of the strata, but the next largest specimen of this species that I have found (of around 50) could almost fit in the aperture opening of this specimen. There is a hint of a selenizone and it's general shape strongly suggests Shansiella. I donated this along with another gastropod that I hope to write about in a future study.

 

CG-0144-shansiella-carbonaria-002.jpg

  • I found this Informative 2
  • Enjoyed 7
Link to post
Share on other sites
TheRocksWillShoutHisGlory

Fan worm (mazopherusa prinosi) and Lingulid association

Period: middle Pennsylvanian, moscovian

Formation:  Carbondale formation, Francis creek shale

Locality: Mazon creek, Braceville, IL

Donated to: Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL

Catalog number: PE 93011

Description:  a lingulid brachiopod with a full pedicle associated with a Mozopherusa prinosi Fanwood with an open fan.  

 

Commentary:  Lingula is an extant species with relatives with similar physical traits dating back to the cambrian, however conditions are rare for the fossilization of the "stalk" or pedicle.  I was given a tour of the invertebrate collection of the museum and there was one example of a decent pedicle, but without the attachment point.  I have read of one ordivician specimen having the full pedicle, otherwise I am unaware of another such specimen.  Also preserved is a Mazopherusi fan worm, showing an association of the two filter feeders.  The fossil is being loaned to Yale for a study on fan worms. 

20220218_201937.thumb.jpg.0c08619b913878f4d3fbfe0562855700.jpg

20220218_201335.thumb.jpg.2e811a11238bc0095342cc6527320dc3.jpg

  • I found this Informative 2
  • Enjoyed 6
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
CH4ShotCaller

After many years, decades in fact, a fossil I found in the Oligocene marine sediments (Lincoln Creek Formation) was published. One is at the Burke Museum and another in a Museum in Sweden. Short and easy, it's a sea pen. Originally found in 1988, I posted it on TFF many years ago, but recently took it off the shelf and asked Dr Boessenecker to give it a go. He put me in contact with James Goedert and through his associate in Sweden, was able to identify the critter. Here's the publication link at the Journal of Paleontology. Open access. 

https://www.doi.org/10.1017/jpa.2022.5

20200625_065228.jpg

  • I found this Informative 1
  • Enjoyed 9
  • I Agree 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
RFausta

(Yes, i know it only counts once but I love all three of these equally!)

 

1.)

Common or Scientific Name- Brittle Star (Ophiuroidea)


Geologic Formation or Geologic Age-Castaic Formation, Upper Miocene


Region the fossil was found-Southern California


Museum or University that received the fossil- Los Angeles County Natural History Museum


A beautifully preserved brittle star, an uncommon find. 

0123E11D-726B-43D7-8BC1-0A444B88E089.jpeg

 

2.) 

 

Common or Scientific Name- Bramble Shark, echinorhinus brucus (tooth)


Geologic Formation or Geologic Age- Castaic Formation, Upper Miocene


Region the fossil was found- Southern California


Museum or University that received the fossil- Los Angeles County Natural History Museum


To the best of my knowledge, no Bramble sharks have previously been reported from this formation.

4A35F0A6-AB3B-4528-8C8E-41E08553FF1A.jpeg

 

 

3.)

 

Common or Scientific Name-  Cervidae, possibly elk or cervalces, molar enamel fragment


Geologic Formation or Geologic Age-Quaternary


Region the fossil was found-Big Brook, New Jersey


Museum or University that received the fossil- NJ State Museum


This fragment was found in Big Brook, so its exact provenance is unknown, but the NJ museum expressed interest due to its preservation (permineralized thoroughly) and its being certainly from an extinct species for the area (The fossil fragment compares favorably to Cervalces).

 

0A2B9FAB-4BDE-4093-9649-F9931B67B26F.jpeg

  • I found this Informative 2
  • Enjoyed 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
Jared C

Slab containing Ptychodus tooth of an upcoming species + isolated mosasaur tooth (possibly russelosaur)

Eagle Ford fm - Turonian 

Texas

Southern Methodist University collection

 

Donated to help correlate the locality it was found in, which is important for other fossils, with other localities that are well dated, using the occurrence of the new Ptychodus in cross reference with other fossils found at the site. 

 

IMG-8110.thumb.jpg.c84c952c8298273238a6d46c1de63d84.jpg1326531656_IMG-8109(1).thumb.jpg.3d573574453fa99f4577a76c5091135d.jpg1894813368_IMG-8107(1).thumb.jpg.a9ae6c2187376e3d9f91d7289c3fa963.jpg

 

Trip report where I found it below:

 

Edited by Jared C
  • I found this Informative 1
  • Enjoyed 13
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
Jared C

Dolichosaur vertebra (most likely Coniasaur)

Eagle Ford formation , Turonian 

Texas

SMU collection

 

Donated to help build a picture of fauna at a site which is notable for other important fossils being found and researched right now. 

 

dolichosaur.thumb.jpg.1b5b7c501382a0c107398b448a889ace.jpg

  • I found this Informative 1
  • Enjoyed 10
  • Thank You 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...
connorp

Common or Scientific Name: Crinoid holdfast on unknown doughnut-shaped object
Geologic Formation or Geologic Age: Fairview Formation (Upper Ordovician)
Region the fossil was found: Near Maysville, Kentucky
Museum or University that received the fossil: Cincinnati Museum Center
Reason for the fossil contribution: The doughnut-shaped object is insofar a mystery. Some suggestions included a sponge, stromatoporoid, or bryozoan. Similar "doughnuts" have been found, but all have been much smaller than this one. Whatever this is, it is very unusual.

 

md1.thumb.jpg.7f74f1350d815c8c990c0643f92465b9.jpg

 

md2.thumb.jpg.821704b6a3ea697a003a5b3d681c1d77.jpg

 

 

  • I found this Informative 1
  • Enjoyed 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
MarcoSr

I collected and donated thousands of micro mammal specimens from anthills on my sons’ M&M Ranch in Nebraska, which are now described in the following publication: 

 

PALUDICOLA SCIENTIFIC CONTRIBUTIONS of the ROCHESTER INSTITUTE OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY Special Issue VOLUME 13 NUMBER 4 1 MAY 2022 “Fossil mammals from ant mounds situated on exposures of the Big Cottonwood Creek Member of the Chadron Formation (latest Eocene-early Oligocene), Sioux County, Nebraska  - William W. Korth, Clint A. Boyd, Jeff J. Person, and Deborah K. Anderson”

 

 

 

459637489_PaludicolaPublicationCover1.jpg.b0814746c7754adb5f5c7d66023029d5.jpg

 

 

 

The publication describes 4 new genera and 10 new species of mammals from my donated specimens.  See below:

 

Scientific Name:

1)  cylindrodont  Siouxlindrodon sullivani n. genus n. sp.

 

2) aplodontid Costepeiromys attasorus n. genus n. sp.

 

3) aplodontid Protansomys gulottai n. genus n. sp.

 

4) ischyromyid Ischyromys brevidens n. sp.

 

5) eomyid Paradjidaumo patriciae n. sp.

 

6) eomyid Yoderimys massarae n. sp.

 

7) eomyid Litoyoderimys grossus n. sp.

 

8) florentiamyid Kirkomys miriamae n. sp.

 

9) sciurid Cedromus modicus n. sp.

 

10) oligoryctid Oligoryctes tenutalonidus n. sp.

 

Geologic Age:  latest Eocene-early Oligocene

Geologic Formation:  Big Cottonwood Creek Member of the Chadron Formation

Region:  M&M Ranch, Sioux County, Nebraska, US

 

Museum:  South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Museum of Geology

 

Reason for contribution:  New Species

 

 

 

 

 

Link to Discussion:  https://www.thefossilforum.com/index.php?/topic/108470-mammals-rodents-insectivores-marsupials-and-carnivores-from-the-eoceneoligocene-mm-ranch-in-nebraska/

 

 

Link to Paper in the Journal Paludicolahttps://rivp-paludicola.org/home-page/

 

 

 

Figures from the paper showing the new species:

 

 

960673767_1cylindrodontSiouxlindrodonsullivanin.genusn_sp..thumb.jpg.568296846c366079ccb8b67d4bc5b6d6.jpg

 

2022366884_2aplodontidCosepeiromysattasorusn.genusn_sp..jpg.2a2a6a72421e3a5e542ce52a7e58ca61.jpg

 

750400256_3aplodontidProtansomysgulottain.genusn_sp..jpg.f007fdda382b40ed953d2adc12862a87.jpg

 

1647391282_4ischyromyidIschyromysbrevidensn_sp..jpg.e5f359c2e41191b65fb1c6019d088ec0.jpg

 

415296176_5eomyidParadjidaumopatriciaen_sp..jpg.dd132a33cecde63bd55a343e88f8ab6b.jpg

 

1147221082_6eomyidYoderimysmassaraen_sp.7eomyidLitoyoderimysgrossusn_sp..thumb.jpg.b6e9fb236d763423981a254b5e759700.jpg

 

876394445_8florentiamyidKirkomysmiriamaen_sp..jpg.244ed31845a760646a470bb64f03d3dc.jpg

 

541001565_9sciuridCedromusmodicusn_sp..thumb.jpg.2d96195dc7bdde4fb48aee776c7c9ae9.jpg

 

1847561997_10oligoryctidOligoryctestenutalonidusn_sp..jpg.693ddbb7a599a145999eb7c78cccf632.jpg

 

 

Marco Sr.

 

 

 

  • I found this Informative 1
  • Enjoyed 8
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
deutscheben

Tetrapod larva and Orthacanthus tooth

Carbondale Formation - Francis Creek Shale - Pennsylvanian

Grundy County, IL

Found in August 2021, Donated to the Field Museum of Natural History, June 2022

 

Both specimens are well-preserved examples of extremely rare taxa from Mazon Creek.

 

262CE454-4A93-4CF7-A088-B049FAB722E7.thumb.jpeg.c9714f5481c0fb50f8c0ece4de7d9215.jpeg
 

DE6FE920-28CC-40EA-829D-6D192760476B.thumb.jpeg.3a940d25da9b7546b3badad8b4b39b9f.jpeg

  • Enjoyed 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...
historianmichael

Common or Scientific Name: Lophoranina lincki
Geologic Formation: Glendon Limestone

Geologic Age: Lower Oligocene
Region the fossil was found: Mississippi

Museum that received the fossil: Mississippi Museum of Natural Science

A short note explaining the reason for the fossil contribution: This specimen is only the third known example of this species and with a well preserved dorsal cuticle it rivals the holotype and paratype in terms of preservation

 

2034423573_ScreenShot2022-07-26at5_03_54PM.png.b2924c62ff0ef587883f70c888b17238.png 874452466_ScreenShot2022-07-26at5_04_05PM.png.a0ac412b22c8474d633ba857bab3f386.png

169334394_ScreenShot2022-07-26at5_04_17PM.png.476420eb1dda75d99e96ce5f16144d4f.png 736426825_ScreenShot2022-07-26at5_04_26PM.png.074f20ad9ebb76bd02a1ffcabe7b99e2.png

  • Enjoyed 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Common or Scientific Name: Catacoeloceras pettos (QUENSTEDT, 1843)
Geologic Formation: Davoei-Zone

Geologic Age: Lower Jurassic, Pliensbachium
Region the fossil was found: Velpe, short-time-quarry of ABC-Klinkergroup, Danebrock (Velpe is near Osnabrück in northern Germany)

Museum that received the fossil: Hosted in the collection of Ruhr University of Bochum, middle Germany

 

 

When I was a private scientist (and sometimes a University-Member) I published many papers about westphalian fossils. Many of them I found myself and donated them to museums. Like this rare Catacoeloceras (first one very found there and from this age!) (and the other fossils in this paper) to Ruhrlandmuseum Essen and University of Bochum

 

2003_1.pdf (ap-h.de) (page 14 ff)

 

My aim is the new and scientific interesting fossils must be stored in a museum collection. Not every finding, only the one that will be figured in a paper. Please excuse the bad pic, most of my donations to museums had been done in the pre-digital-time..., and before I started to become a photographer :eyeroll:

 

DSCN1646xxx.jpg

DSCN1648.JPG

  • Enjoyed 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Common or Scientific Name: Platyptergius campylodon (CARTER)
Geologic Formation: Cretaceous

Geologic Age: Lower Cenomanian, Zone of Mantelliceras dixoni
Region the fossil was found: Dörenthe, Quarry of Wallmeyer & Co., before Quarry of Family Breckweg, Teutoburger Wald between Dörenthe und Ibbenbüren.  (TK 25, Blatt 3712 Ibbenbüren, H: 5791000, R: 3410050)

Museum that received the fossil: Westfalian Museum of natural history, Collection-number WMfN P 28439 - P 28445

 

When we found it end of the 90th we were surpise. I have no digital photos, loooooooong time ago... So, see the parts in the paper.

Marine reptiles are rare finds in the german cretaceous and not many fragments are known. And, this is Ichthyosaur! One of the last remains ever, perhaps the youngest ever found. This was the reason to give it to the central westphalian Museum and published a paper about it:

 

Geologie und Paläontologie in Westfalen (lwl.org)

 

Screenshot_20220731-094408~2.png

 

Screenshot_20220731-094446~2.png

 

Edited by JohnJ
Added required images from the paper ;)
  • Enjoyed 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...
Royal peacock opal mine

Miocene 

Spruce tree limb -Conifer 

Found in Virgin Valley, NV 

Humbolt County Museum 


This Spruce branch was buried in conditions that prevented it from rotting out at all, instead it was fossilized where it sat for who knows how long until the hydrated ash (Si02 Nh20) worked itself down whatever it could get through (or some say the silica gel was forced up from all the geothermal activities) finding cavities along the way to call home for the next X amount of years.

 

this piece was donated for the reason that there was barely anything on display. Been wanting to do it for a long time anyways so thought better late than never.

 

 

2816706C-7F74-4486-85D2-4C865FCA5B87.png  DCFBE3CE-BBE4-4108-A706-3DB990362FC3.png

 

BE6B149C-15E2-4CF2-89A0-89B2E748E6F8.png  05E1D1B6-C778-4B88-B00E-30FAD1E50B80.png

 

F6E3207C-7216-47B1-A147-2B9666AA4B63.png  8906B3F7-DF1A-400B-B8E6-A3E97BBF702F.png

 

C76DCEC2-4211-483F-9D1D-A437EF960B67.png  2B3674EC-48DD-477D-AEC2-9C10BF019C50.png

 

6818F190-6156-442A-9900-80DF7151FBED.png  2874DFF9-64EE-4A74-AA4F-7F1F79040733.png

 

F6E713DB-2E96-487F-9818-9EAC9502FD85.png  AF05CA30-14F4-45FF-A1C2-411EB3354524.png

  • Enjoyed 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Bison bison.

Wisconsin glaciation.
Southern Minnesota, Brown County.

Science Museum of Minnesota.


Found in a riverbed in September of 2020 on a joint citizen scientist and Science Museum outing. I found this femur by noticing the femoral head sticking out of the river bottom.

 

Original Post: 


External Post: 

 

 

 

 

 

397200696_IMG_20200901_145551-Copy.jpg

1117315535_IMG_20200901_145336-Copy.jpg

1865095000_IMG_20200901_145313-Copy.jpg

1054000986_IMG_20200901_145043-Copy.jpg

2052539685_IMG_20200901_150123-Copy.jpg

  • Enjoyed 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Bison bison.

Wisconsin glaciation.
Southern Minnesota, Brown County.

Science Museum of Minnesota.


Found in a riverbed in July of 2020 on a joint citizen scientist and Science Museum outing. I found this partial mandible stuck between some large stones in the river bottom. Collected under permit in Flandreau State Park.

 

Original Post: 

 

External Post: 

 

IMG_20200721_143242 - Copy-1024x768.jpg

IMG_20200721_143250 - Copy-1024x768.jpg

IMG_20200721_143612 - Copy-1024x768.jpg

IMG_20200721_143130 (2) - Copy-1024x768.jpg

Edited by dbrake40
  • Enjoyed 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
minnbuckeye

Legume Seed Pod

Green River Formation

NE Utah

Tate Museum, Casper, Wy 

 

This was one of many fossils found on that trip (Round 3 of Western Trip). After some correspondence with JP, I was happy to see this specimen land in his museum. 

 

DSC_0208-001.thumb.JPG.45a0c63bfd01e5ce470158da9f88aa24.JPG

 

DSC_0209-002.thumb.JPG.b051b5ae52fd9dc4a4a1b5f4ecbab771.JPG

 

 

 

Edited by minnbuckeye
  • Enjoyed 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...