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phymosoma spp Beachy head


will stevenson

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will stevenson

Hi guys do you think you could get this to a species level, might be being a bit picky but I thought it was worth a try:) it’s 3cmlong and 1.3 cm tall sorry if the photos were bad I tried my bestD6B3CA78-6CFC-4DBD-8E79-08F3FE0DF1C1.thumb.jpeg.dc06e230556c94f9477db53baf3cc8d0.jpeg4EB58690-6978-4364-8EAA-C97F1B868E52.thumb.jpeg.4d8326b2fd881cd5fc7e006f23c4d62b.jpeg1447C3FB-10AD-4E8B-848A-3EB92E9355D9.thumb.jpeg.d4349e229a49903a6d95d7be71513670.jpeg06E02D95-0A82-46C8-B930-70804668E27F.thumb.jpeg.d0890d1c51cde9c38bb0a8801f57b54f.jpeg4AA2F5A3-FD37-471F-AC37-D701018090A0.thumb.jpeg.a802a6b7520a730f741f5b068500d343.jpeg

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Are the tubercles perforate?

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will stevenson
14 hours ago, JohnJ said:

Are the tubercles perforate?

Hi john, does that mean do they have holes in?:)

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caterpillar

Yes. If not perforate it's a Phymosomatidae

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will stevenson
20 hours ago, caterpillar said:

Yes. If not perforate it's a Phymosomatidae

I will have a look:)

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will stevenson
On 10/04/2020 at 9:48 PM, JohnJ said:

Are the tubercles perforate?

 

On 11/04/2020 at 5:31 PM, caterpillar said:

Yes. If not perforate it's a Phymosomatidae

Yes they aren’t perforated they are like small pinnules on the end:)

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caterpillar

As I can see it could be a Polydiadema

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caterpillar

Sorry. I just see that Polydiadema has perfored tubercules.

So It could be Trochalosoma

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15 minutes ago, caterpillar said:

So It could be Trochalosoma

 

Quite possible.

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will stevenson
On 13/04/2020 at 5:06 PM, caterpillar said:

Sorry. I just see that Polydiadema has perfored tubercules.

So It could be Trochalosoma

So we can get it to trochalosoma spp

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4 minutes ago, will stevenson said:

So we can get it to trochalosoma spp

 

Do some comparative research.  Echinoid identification from you photos would be difficult.  Even with the specimen in hand, it is often not easy.  ;)

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will stevenson
3 minutes ago, JohnJ said:

 

Do some comparative research.  Echinoid identification from you photos would be difficult.  Even with the specimen in hand, it is often not easy.  ;)

Doesn’t it seem a bit wide:) 

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Will, you are drawing conclusions from sketches of one species.  Research the different known species and the diagnostic features to make a better diagnosis.  ;)

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will stevenson
18 minutes ago, JohnJ said:

Will, you are drawing conclusions from sketches of one species.  Research the different known species and the diagnostic features to make a better diagnosis.  ;)

Oops didn’t realise it wasn’t a specific species, sorry I am better at identifying shark teeth, never tried it with an echinoid so not familiar with names

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caterpillar

If you want to identify a sea urchin, you have to look at all the characteristics. In these photos, we do not distinguish much. You have the sea urchin in hand and you have to compare with everything that is marked on the Trochalosoma desciption.
Also you should know in which geological level you found this sea urchin.

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will stevenson
On 15/04/2020 at 8:35 AM, caterpillar said:

If you want to identify a sea urchin, you have to look at all the characteristics. In these photos, we do not distinguish much. You have the sea urchin in hand and you have to compare with everything that is marked on the Trochalosoma desciption.
Also you should know in which geological level you found this sea urchin.

i will put some more time into research but here is the formation  Zig Zag Chalk Formation (Cenomanian stage of c.96 Mya) white chalk sub group

i think it could be phymosoma koenigi as trochalosoma doesnt occur according to my research in englands cenomian

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