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On this my 79th Birthday, I have a desire to reconnect with some fossils that I found while in high school near my home at the time in Ellwood City Pa. Those fossils are long gone donated to schools. I recall finding a number of brachiopods and what I believed to be a shark tooth (never had it formally ided) If anyone has a collection from the Vanport, I would be delighted to see pictures posted and maybe when life resumes trade for some fossils. The Vanport was used in making Portland cement and there were a number of companies. Later in life I tried to collect again but the quarries I knew were filled in. I tried looking on line to see fossils from the Vanport but I did not have any success. Any information anyone could provide would be greatly appreciated. Stay safe out there.

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Happy birthday! (It is mine today as well!). 

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@Kane:raindance:This is my exercise for the day! Happy Birthday to you and many more. My wife made me a pineapple upside down cake. Seemed appropriate for these chaotic times. I never had the opportunity to hunt in the Devonian. Went to school in Cincinnatti Ohio and got hooked on Ordovician fossils. Then found out about fossils in my home area from the Vanport-Pennsylvanian. Be safe and healthy. Tom

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yes, happy birthday to you both! Can't help with the fossils, but I can help with the B-day wishes! 

 

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Tidgy's Dad

A very, very happy birthday to Tom @fossilnut and @Kane

Wishing you both a wonderful day and many more birthdays and fossils to come.

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And good luck with your quest, Tom. 

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@Tidgy's DadThanks for all the above. Enjoy what you can make Tidgy do. It is beyond my ken. Finally, I noted your quote at the bottom. There must be an interesting story behind that. You are the real deal. Always provide great information. Thanks for your help. Back in my day we actually had to study Latin. Have not seen anyone using it in years! :default_faint:Tom

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Nice story and happy birthday @fossilnut and @Kane . I hope you both had a great day.

 

All the best Bobby 

 

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Tidgy's Dad
2 hours ago, fossilnut said:

@Tidgy's DadThanks for all the above. Enjoy what you can make Tidgy do. It is beyond my ken. Finally, I noted your quote at the bottom. There must be an interesting story behind that. You are the real deal. Always provide great information. Thanks for your help. Back in my day we actually had to study Latin. Have not seen anyone using it in years! :default_faint:Tom

I can't claim any ability in creating gifs either. Marvelous Mike @Pagurusmakes them for me. 

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It's one of my mottoes, the other being "Vita est bona", of course. 

Regarding bread and circuses, well, that really is a long story but basically relates to keeping people quiet when they should be speaking out. 

I also was taught Latin at school, I chose it as my compulsory language for 'O' level as i felt it would be of more use with my fossils than French or German etc. We used to call our teacher "senex" rather unoriginally, I'm sure, but he was a very, very old man who we reckoned spoke Latin as his native tongue back in the day! He was lovely, actually. I did continue studying it privately later on, as well as ancient Greek, but I've forgotten  a great deal of it now.

And thank you very much for the kind words. 

Take care,

Adam.

 

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            @fossilnut and @Kane, a very happy Birthday to you both.  :yay-smiley-1:

BTW, in my youth I too studied Latin, Kione Greek, and Hebrew.  (Don't ask.)

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Happy Birthday @fossilnut and @Kane. 

 

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@CocoThanks. Wanted to let you know that the shark skin and the ray egg cases have been put to use for people to see, touch and feel at the past two shark week programs that the fossil club at the Natural History Society of Maryland has done. Thanks. I hope you are doing better. Tom

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@PagurusI noted your name and picture(can't think of the proper word) for awhile now. I have hesitated to contact you since we have never been in touch. A couple of years ago at North Myrtle Beach SC I hit two days where at low tide I picked up 330 fossilized bryozoan covered snail shells that had been occupied by a hermit crab. You are probably familiar with bryoliths. I had in previous years found a half dozen or so but thus was the jackpot! After that I was back to finding only a few. I also had found a coral covered bryolith in the Pinecrest beds in Florida. I have never found one in Maryland's Calvert Cliffs but friends have given me two examples. One shows evidence of a hermit crabs occupation because the area near the aperture is worn smooth from the crabs dragging it along the sandy bottom. Neat. I do a general audience talk called a Trilogy: Predation, Protection (pearls) and cooperation (dead snail, hermit crab and bryozoan). I will see if I can find my pics to attach. I scraped away the bryozoan to expose the very small original snail shell. The bryozoa is 60 to 90% of the fossil. It allowed the crab to live out its life within that one shell. The bryozoan growth expanded the aperture and living area.  Thanks for the birthday greetings. Tom

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11 hours ago, fossilnut said:

@Tidgy's DadThanks for all the above. Enjoy what you can make Tidgy do. It is beyond my ken. Finally, I noted your quote at the bottom. There must be an interesting story behind that. You are the real deal. Always provide great information. Thanks for your help. Back in my day we actually had to study Latin. Have not seen anyone using it in years! :default_faint:Tom

 

Hi Fossilnut,

 

I think Latin was still a language to study in high school as of the late 70's.  I think it was dropped pretty much across the country sometime in the 80's - not sure.  I took French in high school and some linguistics classes in college.  I can tell you Latin still exists in the corners of the English language, that meaning people still pepper their language with it even if they aren't aware of it (a lot of it in science and religion of course).

 

We still say "et cetera" and "tempus fugit."  Every once in a while, someone says "Pax vobiscum" (Peace be with you), and of course, the U.S. Marines have "Semper Fidelis (Semper Fi) as their motto.  Last year, there was movie with a Latin title, "Ad Astra."  I also recall a 1980 movie, "The Girl, the Gold Watch, and Everything" in which a magical watch has an inscription in Latin that means, "Time waits for one man."  I don't recall the Latin words.  I don't have the original novel handy to check that.  The movie might be on the web somewhere (good movie).

 

My interest in languages came from learning all the dinosaur names and what they mean as a kid.  I became a good speller that way too.  If you can spell "Pachycephalosaurus" or "Archaeopteryx," you can spell anything.

 

Jess 

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Tidgy's Dad
1 hour ago, siteseer said:

 "Time waits for one man."  I don't recall the Latin words.  

That would be, "Tempus unum hominem manet."

A play on the phrase, "Tempus neminem manet" - Time waits for nobody.

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@Tidgy's Dad, @siteseer, @grandpaFor some reason the @ did not work for Adam and siteseer. One last comment on latin. I was in a seminary while in high school. As foolish teenagers we thought it was very funny that we devised the motto for the cafeteria as he knows faith in latin-"fidem scit".  Everyone keep smiling and we will get thru this with our sanity. Be safe and stay healthy.

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On 4/5/2020 at 10:29 PM, Tidgy's Dad said:

That would be, "Tempus unum hominem manet."

A play on the phrase, "Tempus neminem manet" - Time waits for nobody.

 

Nice pick-up!

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On 4/5/2020 at 8:09 PM, fossilnut said:

@PagurusI noted your name and picture(can't think of the proper word) for awhile now. I have hesitated to contact you since we have never been in touch. A couple of years ago at North Myrtle Beach SC I hit two days where at low tide I picked up 330 fossilized bryozoan covered snail shells that had been occupied by a hermit crab. You are probably familiar with bryoliths. I had in previous years found a half dozen or so but thus was the jackpot! After that I was back to finding only a few. I also had found a coral covered bryolith in the Pinecrest beds in Florida. I have never found one in Maryland's Calvert Cliffs but friends have given me two examples. One shows evidence of a hermit crabs occupation because the area near the aperture is worn smooth from the crabs dragging it along the sandy bottom. Neat. I do a general audience talk called a Trilogy: Predation, Protection (pearls) and cooperation (dead snail, hermit crab and bryozoan). I will see if I can find my pics to attach. I scraped away the bryozoan to expose the very small original snail shell. The bryozoa is 60 to 90% of the fossil. It allowed the crab to live out its life within that one shell. The bryozoan growth expanded the aperture and living area.  Thanks for the birthday greetings. Tom

 

 

Hi, Tom. I'm sorry it's taken me this long to respond. Thanks for your interesting post!  It looks like you found the mother-lode of hermit-crab-sheltering bryoliths. I've come across a few over the years, occasionally occupied by a hermit crab, but most of mine were probably recent and not fossils. I've always been fond of hermit crabs, since my first encounter on the coast of Maine about seventy years ago. More than thirty years ago I wrote and illustrated a highly anthropomorphic picture book about a hermit crab, and my screen name is just a result of that association rather than any pagurid expertise.  Over the years I have shared living hermit crabs and lots of other sea creatures with about two hundred thousand elementary school kids, but my knowledge is still mostly rudimentary.  For more than thirty years I kept a few species in my household aquaria, but all my tanks are now empty, and I'm no longer doing any school presentations. I miss them.

 

I can't find, in my collections, any bryoliths that may have housed a hermit crab, but I do have these examples. I think two of them would be called bryoliths, anyway. One is nucleated on a stone and the other is encrusting a slipper shell, Credpidula.  The encrustations include tube worms along with the bryozoans. The snail, a periwinkle (Littorina), appears to be encrusted by an alga, and might be better referred to as a rhodolith, although I'm not sure if there are enough layers?. I think this probably did shelter a hermit crab at one time.  Thanks again for your post! 

 

Stay safe, be well,

Mike

 

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@PagurusNice to hear from you. Loved the pictures especially the bryozoan on the phone. Wow you talked to a lot of students and I am sure they loved seeing all the marine critters. I done a little of that myself and it is great fun. I am sure that you miss it. Impressed that you wrote a book on hermit crab and see that you got a "wordsmithing award" from TFF. Congratulations! Hope we both can soon get back to beaches. Be safe Tom

 

I am sending you unsolicited the written presentation (sorry I don't know how to send the  power point that goes with it) that includes the bryozoan covered snails home of the hermit crab. Any comments you might care to make it better would be appreciated. Happy Easter Tom

PREDATION BY MARINE GASTROPODS(1).pdf  @Pagurus

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